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The Playlist

David Cronenberg To Direct TV Pilot 'Knifeman,' Sam Raimi Executive Producing

  • By Joe Cunningham
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  • March 13, 2012 9:46 AM
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  • 0 Comments
We've come to expect the unexpected from David Cronenberg, and we certainly didn't foresee that his first feature film in four years, "A Dangerous Method," would turn out to be a talky, stagey, history lesson (even with a good deal of spanking). Neither did we expect that he'd ever be directing a cast that included Robert Pattinson and Jay Baruchel, but we'll see them both in "Cosmopolis" later this year. And we certainly didn't expect that the director, having not stepped onto a television set in over two decades (he helmed an episode of the shortlived "Friday The 13th" series), would be headed back to the small screen.

Watch: Lost 1951 Short Film 'Modern Football' Directed By Robert Altman

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 13, 2012 9:23 AM
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  • 1 Comment
We live in an age where it seems almost every movie is just a mouse click or Netflix queue away, but there are still corners and pockets of the cinema world that are hiding in boxes or have been neglected by time waiting to be rediscovered. And even someone like the legendary Robert Altman still has a few things yet to see to the light of day. However, one of them has now been discovered thanks to director Gary Huggins.

'50/50' Helmer Jonathan Levine In Talks To Direct McG-Produced, Stephen Gaghan-Penned Spy Flick 'Dead Spy Running'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • March 13, 2012 9:01 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Given that the Bourne, Bond and 'Mission: Impossible' franchises are about as reliable a way of landing a hit as you could ask for, finding a new spy series to turn into a blockbuster is sort of the Holy Grail these days. But clearly, it's trickier to make it work than studio executives would hope for: from "The Saint" and "xXx" to "Shooter," through "Salt" and "Abduction," DVD bargain bins are littered with espionage actioners that never quite got enough traction to sustain a long-running series.

Review: '21 Jump Street' Is A Hilarious, Heartfelt Action-Comedy That Just Might Be An Instant Classic

  • By Todd Gilchrist
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  • March 12, 2012 10:30 PM
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  • 5 Comments
In cinema as in life, self-awareness can be a virtue or it can be a deadly thing. Since there’s essentially no such thing as originality, conceding that you’re working within existing parameters or with familiar formulas excuses, and can sometimes enhance, the effectiveness of a lot of necessary decisions that eventually must be made in order to tell a story. Calling too much attention to those choices, however, turns storytelling into parody, characters into punch lines, and any emotional investment that may once have existed into fodder for dismissal, if not derision.

Joe Wright's 'Anna Karenina' Starring Keira Knightley Set For November 9th Release

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 12, 2012 10:16 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Could Keira Knightley be angling for her second Oscar nomination this fall? You can bet Focus Features and Joe Wright hope so (and we're predicting she will) as "Anna Karenina" now has a solid release date lined up, with "The Cold Light Of Day" getting a new date and "Lola Versus" now appearing on the calendar.

SXSW '12 Review: The Duplass Brothers' 'Do-Deca Pentathlon' Is A Minor Effort That Should Have Remained Buried

  • By Katie Walsh
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  • March 12, 2012 9:43 PM
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  • 4 Comments
It’s always important to keep in mind, while reading reviews, that interpreting art is a deeply personal experience. What might speak to someone on a visceral, emotional level will slide right over another’s head. Or anger them. Or bore them to tears. The third option was the experience of this writer with Mark and Jay Duplass’ “Do-Deca Pentathlon.”

SXSW '12 Review: HBO Series 'Girls' Solidifies Lena Dunham's Place As A Bold New Voice in American Comedy

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • March 12, 2012 9:25 PM
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  • 10 Comments
As far as young independent filmmakers go, writer/director Lena Dunham has been the subject of an excessive amount of conversation and handwringing, even by the admittedly loose standards of the ever-chatty Internet age. Her first feature, "Creative Nonfiction," was accepted to South by Southwest and the follow-up, "Tiny Furniture," won the Best Narrative Feature award at the same festival. That film also managed to attract quite a bit of attention, with comedy world luminaries like Will Ferrell and Judd Apatow singing its praises and some comparing her confessional, no-nonsense style to the early work of Woody Allen.

Warner Bros. Looking To Kick Ron Howard's 'The Dark Tower' Back To Life; Javier Bardem Still In The Mix

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 12, 2012 8:33 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Just when you think studios are gonna zig, they zag. After a weekend in which audiences rejected "John Carter" and a year in which studios were tightening their belts and dropping expensive and potentially risky projects, one of the biggest of those aborted efforts may be kicking back to life.

'Predators' Director Nimrod Antal To Direct Metallica's 3D Movie For 2013 Release

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 12, 2012 7:00 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Continuing their downward trajectory from badass metal gods, to aging hard rock clowns, Metallica are now doing something that puts them in the same category as Justin Bieber and Katy Perry: they're making a 3D movie. The project was first announced last fall before their dreadful Lulu album with Lou Reed dropped. But it seems there is no bad idea that can keep these guys down, and now their project has a director.

SXSW '12 Review: 'Beast' A Lean & Surreal Portrait Of An Extreme Relationship That Doesn't Quite Go Far Enough

  • By Alison Willmore
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  • March 12, 2012 6:29 PM
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  • 0 Comments
"Beast" is a lean, surreal portrait of a marriage in its extremes from Danish director Christoffer Boe, who's probably still best known for his 2003 feature debut "Reconstruction." The film's focus keeps almost exclusively to Bruno (Nicolas Bro) and Maxine (Marijana Jankovic), a couple whose relationship vacillates between love and hate and a meeting place between the two that approaches the feral. When we first see them, the pair are looking at a beautiful apartment they're considering buying. "Let's take this home and be a family," Bruno proposes. The hope and sweetness of the moment then goes slightly dissonant with unease when Maxine cuts her finger and Bruno sucks at the cut and talks, with all romanticism, about having a part of her inside him.

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