Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

The Playlist

Review: 'The Wicker Tree' Is Almost Weird Enough To Be Enjoyable...Almost...

  • By Drew Taylor
  • |
  • January 26, 2012 4:00 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
In the pantheon of horror films, 1973's "The Wicker Man" occupies a unique place. While well-reviewed at the time, it wasn't a commercial success, perhaps because, despite the appearance of Hammer horror alum Christopher Lee, it was a much folksier, more naturalistic approach to horror. Years later, defunct genre publication Cinefantastique described the film as "the 'Citizen Kane' of horror films," and ever since the movie has reached the rarified air of being a horror film that even movie snobs take very seriously. (There was, of course, the ill-fated 2006 remake that replaced the original's healthy suspicion of paganism with flat-out misogyny. Oh, and Nicolas Cage covered in bees.) So it makes a certain amount of sense why original writer/director Robin Hardy would return to "The Wicker Man" well with "The Wicker Tree," even though it's only tenuously connected to the original film, sharing more of a thematic link more than anything else, and none of the first film's visual sophistication or uneasy sense of dread.
More: Review

'Mirror Mirror' Moves 2 Weeks Back To March 30th; New Look At Kristen Stewart In 'Snow White And The Huntsman'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • January 26, 2012 3:24 PM
  • |
  • 4 Comments
Universal and Relativity spent a good part of last year in a pissing match over release dates for their respective Snow White films, but at the end of the day, it all comes down to the movies, and we'll soon see who emerges victorious. Well, sort of soon.

Sundance: Director Antonio Campos & Stars Of 'Simon Killer' Talk Sociopaths, Sex & Soundtrack To The Film

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • January 26, 2012 2:56 PM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
This time last year, "Martha Marcy May Marlene" was the toast of Sundance, an impossibly tense drama that, even by the end of 2011, still stood tall as one of the year's best films. Last January, "Afterschool" helmer Antonio Campos was in Park City in his capacity as a producer (he's one third of Borderline Films along with 'Martha Marcy' director Sean Durkin and Josh Mond), but twelve months later, he's back as director, with another intense character study, "Simon Killer."

Neal McDonough Says 'Captain America 2' Will Shoot At The End Of The Year & Hopes 'Nick Fury' Will Follow

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • January 26, 2012 2:43 PM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
That "Captain America: The First Avenger" was getting a sequel was inevitable. The film successfully brought the comic hero to the big screen in a rousing and better than expected tentpole, and with Steve Rogers landing in contemporary Manhattan at the end of the film and heading into "The Avengers," there is still more to come.

Sundance Review: 'Shut Up And Play The Hits' Is LCD Soundsystem’s 'The Last Waltz'

  • By William Goss
  • |
  • January 26, 2012 2:16 PM
  • |
  • 4 Comments
Less of a documentary and more of a document, "Shut Up And Play The Hits" captures the week before, the day after and the very occasion of LCD Soundsystem’s Madison Square Garden farewell concert on April 2, 2011.

Review: 'Declaration Of War' Is The Swooning Of A First Love, The Shared Taste Of Tragedy, And How We Survive

  • By Gabe Toro
  • |
  • January 26, 2012 2:05 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
This Friday, multiplexes will sport the battered, wearied visage of Liam Neeson in "The Grey." As the poster has reminded moviegoers for weeks, this is a man about to embark on the challenge of his life, a struggle that will define every day he's ever lived, and the ones he might still grow to experience. "Live or die on this day" the tagline reads. But while the lanky action superstar will fight for his life versus a sea of computer-generated wolves in the Joe Carnahan film, the French picture "Declaration Of War" presents a much more significant, much more dire situation. And, like the protagonist of "The Grey," the characters in this film are prepared to lift their fists and face whatever challenges approach head-on.
More: Review

Darren Aronofsky's 'Noah' Reportedly Has A Big Villain; Summer Shoot & Fall 2013 Release Being Eyed

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • January 26, 2012 2:01 PM
  • |
  • 11 Comments
It's been a while since we last heard anything about Darren Aronofsky's "Noah" which has been on a circuitous path to the big screen. A long-standing dream project for the director, it already has a graphic novel incarnation, but over the past year Fox and New Regency came aboard to finance the big budget spectacle that reportedly has a $130 million budget. The film got another boost when Christian Bale circled the lead role, but his commitments to Terrence Malick's back-to-back films shooting this year took him out, with Michael Fassbender now tipped to take over (though he's remained mum on his potential involvement as it seems too tenuous this early on). We haven't gotten wind of much else in a while but it appears that behind the scenes, the wheels are in motion.

Brad Pitt Says He'll Only Cameo In 'Twelve Years A Slave,' Hopes 'World War Z' Will Have Socio-Political Themes

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • January 26, 2012 1:22 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Whoever ends up winning at the Academy Awards in a few weeks (spoiler: "The Artist"), Brad Pitt will still pretty much be the belle of the ball. He's nominated for Best Actor for "Moneyball," a film that, without Pitt's perseverance, likely wouldn't have gotten made after Sony pulled the plug on Steven Soderbergh's version, while the star also has a nomination in his producer capacity for Best Picture for the project. His other baby of 2011, "The Tree of Life," also surprised many with nominations for Best Picture and Best Director, and Pitt may find himself with a third nomination if the Academy names him as one of the eligible producers on that film.

Liam Neeson Talks Preparing For The Cold In 'The Grey' & His Plans To Do Some 'Die Hard' Style Movies Soon

  • By Jeff Otto
  • |
  • January 26, 2012 1:02 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
The career of Liam Neeson has taken an unmistakable shift in recent years. After a long stretch highlighted by acclaimed performances in epic-tinged material like “Schindler’s List,” “Rob Roy” and “Michael Collins,” Neeson took an unlikely turn in Pierre Morel’s 2008 actioner “Taken,” where he portrayed tough guy retired CIA agent Bryan Mills, kicking ass and taking names rather than delivering eloquent monologues.

Kate Winslet & Catherine Keener Join Charlie Kaufman's Satiric Musical 'Frank Or Francis'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • January 26, 2012 12:53 PM
  • |
  • 9 Comments
Just when we were wondering if production on Charlie Kaufman's ambitious, zany, satiric musical "Frank Or Francis" might have hit the skids, the project has received some new life, adding two of our favorite actresses to the cast.  Vulture reports that Kate Winslet (coming off Emmy and Golden Globes wins for her excellent turn in "Mildred Pierce") and Kaufman regular Catherine Keener ("Synechdoche, New York," "Adaptation," "Being John Malkovich") are coming aboard the film.

Email Updates

Recent Comments