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Sundance Review: 'Nobody Walks' Is A Sensual, Emotionally Complex Film With Humor & Humanity

  • By Cory Everett
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  • January 26, 2012 8:30 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Martine (Olivia Thirlby), a 23 year-old New York artist arrives in L.A. to complete a short film for an upcoming exhibit. We see her embracing a lover in the airport parking lot and just before things get too carried away she puts on the brakes and tells him that it was nice meeting him on the plane. This girl is going to be trouble. The opening credits roll as Martine makes her way from the airport, gazing out the window to take everything in as the city rushes by. With a synthy score by Brooklyn duo Fall On Your Sword (who also scored last year’s Sundance hit “Another Earth” as well as director Ry Russo-Young’s first film “You Won’t Miss Me”), L.A. seems really cool. Coming from the confined apartments and gray skies of NYC (in the winter anyway) the wide open spaces of the west coast start to look really attractive. Martine arrives at the beautiful Silverlake house of therapist Julie (Rosemary DeWitt) and sound designer Peter (John Krasinski) who, due to a loose family connection, have agreed to put her up while Peter can helps her complete her film. Julie has two kids from a previous marriage and Peter as portrayed by the always affable Krasinski, decked out in hoodies and sneakers, seems more like a cool older brother than a step-dad.

Steven Spielberg Zeroing In On 'Saving Private Ryan' Style Moses Tale 'Gods And Kings'; Spring 2013 Start Eyed

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 25, 2012 11:05 PM
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  • 19 Comments
Taking on a Steven Soderbergh or Woody Allen-esque workload, Steven Spielberg -- who dropped two movies in 2011 with "War Horse" and "The Adventures Of Tintin" -- shows no sign of slowing down. He's already deep into his next film, the long developing dream project "Lincoln" which he'll deliver at the end year and after that, he'll shift gears and jump right into "Robopocalypse" which already has a big summer tentpole date of July 3, 2013 penciled in. But it looks like he won't have a moment to slow down.

Sundance Review: Life, And Lust, Find A Way In Well-Performed But Standard-Issue 'The Surrogate'

  • By James Rocchi
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  • January 25, 2012 8:52 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Inspired by the life and writings of Mark O'Brien -- a polio-stricken but determined journalist and poet confined to an iron lung since age six -- "The Surrogate" offers a less comprehensive look at O'Brien's life than Jessica Yu's excellent documentary "Breathing Lessons," but instead focuses on a small sliver of O'Brien's life and living. In 1988, O'Brien, then 38, made a decision to explore his own sexuality -- despite his paralysis - in part inspired by his own research into a story on sex and disability. Unsure about his ability to forge a relationship -- and concerned, as he puts it to his Catholic Priest and confessor, that he's "approaching his use-by date," O'Brien looks into hiring a sex surrogate. The surrogate, Cheryl Cohen Greene, explains that she's not a prostitute, but a therapist -- she and Mark will have six sessions, and then terminate their relationship. It sounds complex. It gets more so.

Sundance: Clarke Peters & Nate Parker And Writer James McBride, Talk Race & Religion In Spike Lee's 'Red Hook Summer'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • January 25, 2012 6:11 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Whatever you thought of his last film, " Miracle At St. Anna" (and we'd argue that it's better than its reputation suggests), most would agree that three-and-a-half years is too long between Spike Lee feature films (though his excellent documentaries have been a good placeholder). One of our most vital filmmakers, behind classics from "Do The Right Thing" to "25th Hour," he delivers work that is always thought-provoking and fiery. And he's not mellowed in his absence; when his latest film, the self-financed "Red Hook Summer," premiered on Sunday night at Sundance, it instantly became one of the controversial, divisive films of the festival, with some calling it a real return to form, and some calling it among his weakest, scrappiest efforts.

Radiohead Clears 14 Songs For Use In Doc 'The Island President,' Get The Full List Here

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 25, 2012 5:46 PM
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  • 0 Comments
One film we're surprised didn't come out of TIFF with more buzz was "The Island President." Granted, we didn't get a chance to screen it, but we heard a lot of good word about the documentary and after picking up the Audience Award in that category, we figured there were bigger things to come. Well, that didn't really happen -- yet -- but some boys over the U.K., in a tiny band you might have heard of called Radiohead, will hopefully be giving the movie a little bit of a boost.
More: Radiohead

Watch Robert De Niro Float In Spanish Trailer For 'Red Lights'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 25, 2012 4:49 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Straight out of the Sundance Film Festival, with a freshly inked distribution deal with Millenium Entertainment, we've now been given our first, extensive look at "Red Lights" from "Buried" director Rodrigo Cortes. But, you might need a translator.
More: Red Lights

Listen: 3 Pieces From Michael Giacchino's Score For 'John Carter'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 25, 2012 4:23 PM
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  • 0 Comments
With Disney's years-in-the-making, reportedly $300 million, sci-fi specatacle "John Carter" hitting theaters in just over a month, it's likely we're going to be hearing and seeing lots more from the film soon. And while the jury is still out on whether the film will live up to the cult status of the Edgar Rice Burroughs source material or the money that has been spent on the project, at the very least, the reliable and always solid Oscar winner Michael Giacchino is scoring the film, so if that even if our eyes aren't pleased, our ears will be.

So Yong Kim Discusses Her Collaboration With Paul Dano & Battling The Freezing Winter In 'For Ellen'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • January 25, 2012 4:00 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Thanks to her previous films "In Between Days" and "Treeless Mountain," and a none-more-indie cast featuring Paul Dano and Jena Malone, So Yong Kim's latest "For Ellen" had to be one of the most anticipated films of Sundance, at least in certain circles.

Demi Moore Out, Chloë Sevigny In For 'Lovelace'; Javier Bardem Bails On 'Despicable Me 2'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 25, 2012 3:45 PM
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  • 0 Comments
With all the buzz going on up in Park City, it's easy to forget that stuff is still happening in good ol' Hollywood, and the past day or so has brought some changes to some brewing films.

Sundance Review: 'Shadow Dancer' A Crackling Conspiracy Thriller

  • By John Lichman
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  • January 25, 2012 3:09 PM
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  • 0 Comments
If “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy” represented the height of Cold War paranoia within the British intelligence community, then “Shadow Dancer” is the next chapter, replacing the ominous Russian government with a more localized threat: The Troubles in Northern Ireland.

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