The Playlist

NYFF ‘11 Review: Scorsese's George Harrison 'Material World' Doc Is A Moving & Striking Portrait

  • By The Playlist
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  • October 1, 2011 8:11 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Rock 'n' roll and Academy-Award-winning Italian American filmmaker Martin Scorsese are inextricably linked. After decades of creating striking pictures soundtracked to the likes of the Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton, and the Phil Spector-produced Girl Group strut and constructing documentaries about some of the biggest giants in contemporary music -- Bob Dylan ("No Direction Home:Bob Dylan"), The Band ("The Last Waltz") and the Stones ("Shine a Light") -- Scorsese finally turned his gaze to one titan in rock he had yet to cross paths with, The Beatles. Or more specifically in this case, the enigmatic "quiet" Beatle, George Harrison (though trainspotters will note that "What Is Life" is briefly featured in "Goodfellas").

Marvel's Kevin Feige Confirms 'The Inhumans' As A Possible Future Marvel Franchise

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • October 1, 2011 4:39 AM
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  • 7 Comments
With Marvel already having brought their A-list comic characters to the big screen, culminating in next springs mega-team-up "The Avengers," the big question is where they will go next. Of course, "Thor," "Captain America" and "Iron Man" still have standalone sequels coming, but the company has been looking at their B-list titles for a while now, trying to figure out where to go next. So far this year we've learned that "Guardians of the Galaxy" is a possibility," Doctor Strange" and "Ant-Man" had scripts handed in, a tease that "Black Widow" and "Hawkeye" could get their own spinoffs, and that "Black Panther" had a writer assigned to it. So, certainly, no shortage of options. But alas, there appears to be more on the table.

NYFF '11 Review: 'Dreileben' Is An Accomplished, Dense Trilogy Spanning Murder, Love & More

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • October 1, 2011 3:20 AM
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  • 4 Comments
With the recent upsurge in quality TV programming and the ensuing embracement by cinema-goers, it was only a matter of time before film festivals actually started programming pieces originally made for the tube. Both "Carlos" and "The Red Riding Trilogy" were of this ilk; flicks broadcast on the small-screen that retained their cinematic quality but took advantage of the long-form storytelling television provided. "Dreileben," the latest of these undertakings, centers on a murder across three feature films each with their own perspective. Things open innocently with a youthful romance, the loose murderer and subsequent manhunt only lurking in the background. Out of sight, out of mind -- but it only lasts for so long. The second feature involves an out-of-towner psychologist helping with the investigation and the third follows the "villain" himself. Much like 'Red Riding,' this triptych is helmed by different directors: Christian Petzold ("Jerichow"), Dominik Graf ("A Map of the Heart"), and critic Christoph Hochhäusler ("The City Below"), each of them part of the "Berlin School" clique in contemporary German cinema.

Review: 'My Joy' Is A Searing Blast On Russian Society Past And Present

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • October 1, 2011 2:53 AM
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  • 2 Comments
After admiring the mixing process of cement, two men heartlessly drop a dead body into the vat. The sun shines, a bulldozer covers the hole, and people get on with their workday. Wait a second, Sergei Loznitsa, you don't really mean that title sincerely, do you?

Review: 'Dream House' Is An Awful Nightmare

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • October 1, 2011 1:07 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Universal has gone out of its way to market the unfortunately dour "Dream House" as a gooseflesh-raising thriller, emphasizing a pair of ghostly girls and positioning them on a decaying staircase in an image eerily evocative of Stanley Kubrick's "The Shining." The fact that this image is so fleeting that its presence in the movie could easily be counted in the milliseconds didn't matter to them. After being delayed due to reshoots and nearly every creative principle publicly distancing themselves from the film (including director Jim Sheridan and stars Daniel Craig and Rachel Weisz), they needed to drum up all the sizzle they could for this supernaturally dull misfire. And hey, little ghost kids is as good a way as any.

Watch: John C. Reilly Is Thrilled To Find Out His Kid Is In A Gang In Amusing Clip From 'Carnage'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • September 30, 2011 12:59 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Oscar contender or merely an amusing trifle? The jury is still out on Roman Polanski's "Carnage" which premiered in August in Venice to mostly good reviews (our own man in Italy said he felt it was more of the latter in his review). The film is making its first North American appearance this weekend at the New York Film Festival where its award season narrative could change if it comes out of screenings with more positive notices.
More: Films, Carnage

Melissa Leo & James Badge Dale Take 'Flight' Together

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • September 30, 2011 12:26 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Update: Shadow & Act reveal that "Franklin & Bash" star Garcelle Beauvais has also joined the cast.

Kurt Russell Is Quentin Tarantino's Plan B Again, Replaces Kevin Costner In 'Django Unchained'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 30, 2011 11:55 AM
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  • 6 Comments
And 'Kill Bill' Vet Laura Cayouette Comes On Board As WellWe hope Quentin Tarantino appreciates how reliable Kurt Russell is. The director originally cast Mickey Rourke as the psychotic Stuntman Mike in his indulgent nadir "Death Proof," but Rourke and Tarantino seemed to fall out before filming began. Russell, the iconic lead of '80s pictures like "The Thing" and "Big Trouble In Little China," stepped in, to great effect, and was easily the best thing in the film. Now, five years on, Russell seems to have repeated the favor.

Kevin Kline To Play Two Characters In Charlie Kaufman's 'Frank Or Francis'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • September 30, 2011 11:24 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Charlie Kaufman -- the writer behind "Being John Malkovich," "Adaptation" and "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" -- is no stranger to high concepts. But believe us, nothing you've seen from him before will prepare you for the absurd and musical-heavy Hollywood send up "Frank or Francis."

'Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters' Writer Dante Harper To Lay 'Foundation' Down For Roland Emmerich

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • September 30, 2011 10:58 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Believe it or not, advance word on Roland Emmerich's Shakespeare conspiracy movie "Anonymous" is actually good. We shit you not. And while the movie is a bit of a departure for the usually disaster-happy director, lately he's surrounding himself with projects that are more in line with his established oeuvre. Up next he's got the epic and somewhat secretive "Singularity," which already has a May 17, 2013 release date. And oh yeah, he was also offered "Asteroids" this summer (though it doesn't seem like he's taken it). But alas, on the backburner for a couple of years now has been an adaptation of Isaac Asimov's classic "Foundation" series.

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