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The Playlist

Kristen Bell Talks ‘Big Miracle,’ Playing Supergirl In ‘Movie 43' & The Hope For A ‘Veronica Mars’ Movie

  • By Jeff Otto
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  • January 30, 2012 10:20 AM
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  • 1 Comment
From TV star to movie star and back again, Kristen Bell is keeping busy. After breaking out as the beloved TV heroine Veronica Mars, Bell has tackled film roles like “Forgetting Sarah Marshall” and “When In Rome” while continuing to dabble on the small screen now and again. In the past, most actors shifted from TV to features and never looked back, but the landscape is changing and Bell is happy to take advantage. Her new Showtime series opposite Don Cheadle, “House Of Lies,” debuted earlier this month to very positive reviews and her latest film role, as reporter Jill Gerard in Ken Kwapis’ political comedy, “Big Miracle,” hitting theaters this Friday. She also just finished up Dax Shepherd’s second directorial effort “Outrun,” which she describes as “in the vein of the Burt Reynolds movies of the ‘70s” and plays Supergirl opposite Justin Long’s Robin in one of the comedy shorts from the upcoming “Movie 43.”

Woody Harrelson Says He'll Re-Team With Oren Moverman Again For A "Manhattan Murder Mystery"

  • By Simon Dang
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  • January 30, 2012 10:00 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Nicolas Winding Refn and Ryan Gosling have pretty staked claim to the biggest director-leading man bromance at the moment, currently lensing their Thai-set actioner "Only God Forgives," but there's another duo who are right behind the Danish-Canadian duo in that regard.

Rooney Mara Replaces Blake Lively As Lead In Steven Soderbergh's 'Side Effects'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • January 30, 2012 9:44 AM
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  • 23 Comments
In just over a year, Rooney Mara has gone from the virtually unknown star of the disastrous remake of "Nightmare On Elm Street" to an Oscar nominee. The missing link: her brief, head-turning appearance in David Fincher's "The Social Network," a performance that helped win her the lead role of Lisbeth Salander in the director's English-language take on "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo." But with a hectic schedule, and busy promotional commitments for that film, the actress has taken her time choosing her follow-up.

James Marsh Working On An Adaptation Of 'The Silent Land' For Focus Features & Talks About Projects 'Valiero' & 'El Aura'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • January 30, 2012 9:21 AM
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  • 2 Comments
James Marsh might have missed out on another Oscar nomination for his excellent film "Project Nim" last week, but he's not too upset.

Joe Carnahan To Write & Direct Remake Of 'Death Wish'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • January 30, 2012 9:04 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Joe Carnahan must be feeling vindicated this morning. The writer/director broke out with 2002's terrific, muscular cop thriller "Narc," but hasn't had a lot of joy since: his 2006 sub-Guy Ritchie action-comedy "Smokin' Aces" wasn't beloved by many, while a director-for-hire gig on the would-be-tentpole "The A-Team" was tepidly received by audiences and critics alike. But from that, he reteamed with star Liam Neeson for a far more personal project, the existential killer-wolf survival tale "The Grey," and was validated in a big way when the positively-received film topped the box office this weekend with a strong $20 million haul. Presumably, this has given him the cache to make something bigger and better next time around, something even dearer to his heart, like dream projects "White Jazz" or "Killing Pablo."

Sundance Review: 'Under African Skies' A Straightforward, But Feel Good Triumph For Fans Of Paul Simon's 'Graceland'

  • By Todd Gilchrist
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  • January 30, 2012 8:31 AM
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  • 0 Comments
A simultaneous portrait of a great moment in music and terrible one in human history, “Under African Skies” tells the story of the making of Paul Simon’s Graceland, and the backdrop of oppression out of which it triumphantly emerged. Director Joe Berlinger takes a closer look at the creation of the landmark album via Simon’s collaborations with a cross-section of South African musicians, in the process highlighting a volatile time in that country’s history, and arguing that the record eventually contributed to the downfall of apartheid, if indirectly. Clean and accurate to its premise without necessarily transcending expectations, “Under African Skies” is a documentary version of “The Help” in that it completely satisfies audiences’ demand for social justice without doing anything surprising in the process.

Sundance Review: 'V/H/S' A Solidly Delivered Horror Anthology That Brings The Thrills

  • By William Goss
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  • January 30, 2012 7:59 AM
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  • 0 Comments
When compared to the pristine picture quality of Blu-ray, the VHS format is a decrepit, grungy thing, so how better to make an anthology of grimy spook stories than to embrace that aesthetic all-around as "V/H/S" does? Made up of six found-footage style segments – few of which actually attempt to replicate the look of old tape, but all of which have their distinct variations in interference and texture – it’s a film consumed with bad deeds recorded and recovered, helmed by a who’s-who of current genre mavens and delivered with a good sense of playfulness around concepts and conceits generally exploited to lure in the gullible masses for the sake of a single opening weekend.

Is The Oscar Next? 'The Help' Tops The 18th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards With Three Prizes Including Best Ensemble

  • By The Playlist
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  • January 29, 2012 8:06 PM
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  • 4 Comments
Well, that’s a wrap. It was pretty much between “The Artist” and “The Help,” but the populist civil rights era film edged out the crowd-pleasing silent film. While “The Artist” is still probably the Best Picture favorite at the Oscars, it was “The Help” that won the Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture award at the 18th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards.

Sundance Review: Weird & Sometimes Confusing 'John Dies At The End' Is Still An Odd & Engaging Genre Treat

  • By John Lichman
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  • January 29, 2012 2:52 PM
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  • 0 Comments
The problem addressing fans of “Midnight” films and wacky horror can succinctly be found in the opening of Don Coscarelli's “John Dies At The End.” It involves axe handles, zombies, mutant leeches, axe heads, hardware store trips and answering a dead man as to whether or not the axe in question is the same that killed him. Confused? If you are, then you don't want to stick around. If you're too overjoyed that the spiritual successor to Sam Raimi has appeared, you're in luck.

Sundance: James Marsh Talks 'Shadow Dancer,' Circling 'Tinker Tailor' & The Oscar Snub For 'The Interrupters' & 'Senna'

  • By John Lichman
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  • January 29, 2012 2:07 PM
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  • 0 Comments
The culmination of James Marsh's slow-burn thriller “Shadow Dancer” is a change of color and a rather sudden spoiler engulfed in a fireball. But it's also another change in direction for the Oscar-winning director of “Man On Wire” and last year’s “Project Nim” that again displays the helmer’s versatility, as he moves between feature films and documentaries. And with his latest starring Clive Owen and Andrea Riseborough, Marsh once again gives viewers a rich world worth exploring, this time in Ireland during The Troubles.

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