The Playlist

TIFF '11 Review: Fernando Meirelles' International Love Story '360' May Leave His Fans Heartbroken

  • By Cory Everett
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  • September 13, 2011 3:00 AM
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  • 15 Comments
In a photo studio in Vienna, a sleazy photographer (Johannes Krisch) is coaxing a young Slovakian woman Mirkha (Lucia Siposová) into posing for her first nude pictures. We soon find out this man is also a pimp and the pictures are for luring clients on the internet. Her younger sister Anna (Gabriela Marcinkova) tries to persuade her to reconsider but she has her mind made up. She needs the money and wants to change her life. Her sister intones through darkly humorous voiceover “If there’s a fork in the road, take it.” It’s a highly provocative opening for what ends up being just a so-so anthology of interweaving tales, even though director Fernando Meirelles ("City Of God," “The Constant Gardener”) assembles an international cast with interwoven stories spanning Vienna, Paris, London, Bratislava, Rio, Denver and Phoenix.

Jay Baruchel to Write 'Baseballissimo' As 'Goon' Sells For Seven Figures

  • By Sam Price
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  • September 13, 2011 2:30 AM
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  • 5 Comments
The awkward kid from "Undeclared" is doing something right. Both as actor and co-writer, Jay Baruchel's name is all over the hockey picture "Goon," a vaguely "Slap Shot"-ish comedy that, until it debuted at Toronto this past week, only had going for it some fairly uninspiring posters, a less than gut-splitting red-band trailer and the weird casting combination of Seann William Scott and Liev Schrieber to its name. But the picture's apparently uproarious, a bloody laugh-fest for the ages, and has exploded the hitherto staid conventions of the hockey picture (whatever they may be), at least until Kevin Smith aims to get his way and begins work on his apparently epic two-part swansong "Hit Somebody."

William Friedkin's 'Killer Joe' Picked Up, Lionsgate Close To Buying 'Friends With Kids'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 13, 2011 2:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Plus Supernatural Thriller 'Enter Nowhere' Finds A Home With Lionsgate TooIt's been a fairly quiet Toronto International Film Festival in terms of acquisitions, with Steve McQueen's "Shame" being the highest-profile buy so far, but even that sold for somewhere below a million dollars, a relatively meager sum. But slowly, things are starting to gear up, with a few films selling in the last 24 hours, and more looking close to being picked up.

Trey Parker & Matt Stone Confirm A 'Book Of Mormon' Movie Is On The Way, But Not Just Yet

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 13, 2011 1:30 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Of all the creative types working today, one would imagine that possibly the least likely to threaten to pick up an EGOT (managing to win an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony, a feat managed by only ten people in history) are the gleefully puerile "South Park" and "Team America" creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone. But somehow, they're heading in that direction. Already the holder of several Emmys for "South Park," their widely acclaimed smash-hit Broadway musical "The Book of Mormon" picked up a record haul of Tonys earlier in the summer, and the cast recording already looks a virtual lock to win in its category at the Grammys next year.

TIFF '11 Review: 'Ten Year' Brings Together A Strong Cast For A Mixed Bag Of Comedy & Drama

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • September 13, 2011 1:00 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Births, funerals, marriage, anniversaries and even annual vacations have all served as plot devices in the reunion film, a genre that usually finds middle-aged or older characters dealing with a crisis that is exacerbated by seeing old family and friends. And while "Ten Year" certainly isn't breaking new territory, producer and star Channing Tatum, along with writer/director Jamie Linden ("Dear John"), do take an interesting approach. Wisely not going far beyond their own age bracket, this film brings together a pretty solid ensemble cast of some of the best up-and-coming actors working right now for a tale that catches up with a gaggle of friends for a reunion -- you guessed it -- ten years after their graduation from high school. Taking on a bunch of characters as they leave their twenties is definitely a smart concept but instead of offering what could have been an honest look at contemporary soon-to-be thirtysomethings and the challenges, fears and triumphs they have endured, "Ten Year" delivers a mixed bag of CW plots that at worst are cliché and predictable, with a very few that do stand out.

TIFF '11 Review: 'Pariah' Is So Much More Than Just This Year's 'Precious'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • September 12, 2011 12:59 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Listen, we understand that sometimes in order to get some attention, indie films need glib comparisons and word out of Sundance this year was that Dee Rees' "Pariah" was this year's "Precious." However, not only is "Pariah" nothing like "Precious", it is so much better and so much more rewarding than anything Lee Daniels' "achieved" with his hysterical, exploitative, ghetto soap opera porno. Real in ways few movies ever are, "Pariah" mixes the coming out and coming-of-age story and pitches it against the backdrop of an African-American family adapting to the shifting cultural sexual tides. The result is a film that is warm and raw, sometimes both at the same time, and is easily one our favorites of the year.

Well, Of Course Alcon Entertainment Is Remaking 'Point Break'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 12, 2011 12:43 PM
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  • 8 Comments
Let's be honest: we knew this day was coming. Let's not try and mount some kind of moral outrage about it. When superhero franchises can be totally rebooted five years after the last entry, anything is up for grabs, and any popular film that still isn't a viable franchise (see: "Die Hard," where Bruce Willis is still mobile enough for a fifth installment) will have the remake vultures circling. But yes. "Point Break" is heading for a remake.

Nicolas Winding Refn May Make A Horror Film With Carey Mulligan

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 12, 2011 11:55 AM
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  • 6 Comments
'Drive' Director Also Talks Action Flick 'Only God Forgives,' An Abandoned Heist Pic & An Albert Brooks-Penned ComedyIf you've read any kind of movie blog in the last six months you're likely to see that almost everyone is enamored with Nicolas Winding Refn's beautiful, thrilling crime picture "Drive," which will undoubtedly nestle near the top of many year-end lists (including ours), when the time comes. It might feel like you've been hearing about the film for years now, seeing as the reviews have been piling in since it bowed at Cannes way back in May, but the film finally hits theaters on Friday, and you'll be able to check out all the fuss for yourself.

The Return Of Whit Stillman, 'Twixt,' Brad Pitt's 'Moneyball' & More: Midway Check-In With TIFF 2011

  • By The Playlist
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  • September 12, 2011 10:50 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Running from September 8-18, we're essentially at the midway check-in point of the Toronto International Film Festival. Keeping up with all of the reviews is nuts, hell keeping up with our own reviews is taxing.

TIFF '11 Review: Haphazard 'Your Sister's Sister' Ambles Towards Drama With Little Consequence

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • September 12, 2011 10:11 AM
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  • 10 Comments
Independent filmmaking has become somewhat hyper-obsessed in the last few years with "realism." Lighting rigs have been put away, available light filling in where it will and scripts tossed out for sketches, shaped by improvisation in an attempt to capture as close to an approximation of real human interaction as possible. It's an admirable approach and not just limited to "mumblecore" movies -- Terrence Malick has followed this path pretty closely throughout this career. However, the risk in this style is that if it's too loose, it can structurally crumble the emotional and narrative focus. And for "Humpday" director Lynn Shelton's "Your Sister's Sister," that's the unfortunate result of the ten day shoot on the film that gathered together a game cast -- Emily Blunt, Rosemarie DeWitt and Mark Duplass -- and sets them loose on a good dramatic premise ill-served by a far too casual approach.

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