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Review: Roland Emmerich's 'Anonymous' Still Manages To Destroy Something -- Its Own Authenticity

  • By Todd Gilchrist
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  • October 24, 2011 2:00 AM
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  • 11 Comments
Combining the life-meets-art origin stories of “Ray” with the history-as-high melodrama of “Braveheart,” “Anonymous” marks a departure from director Roland Emmerich’s previous work as a purveyor of blockbuster destruction, but he still manages to destroy any credible sense of history with his speculative portrait of the man who might have been responsible for the works of William Shakespeare. Emmerich, casting his vote for the “Oxfordian” view of the playwright’s actual identity, turns what could have been an intelligent and provocative examination of fact and fiction into an overwrought and cretinous historical thriller that’s too busy disappearing into flashbacks and other frivolous digressions to bother discovering any actual truth.

Hans Zimmer Decides To Sit Out The Oscar Race This Year

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • October 24, 2011 1:40 AM
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  • 1 Comment
With eight Academy award nominations leading to one win for "The Lion King," composer Hans Zimmer certainly doesn't have anything to prove. Prolific and inventive, he's one of the best in the business, and even with nearly three decades of work tuning up movies, his works remain continually fresh and creative. This year alone has the fifty-four year-old composer taking some fascinating strides, teaming with the Mexican guitar duo Rodrigo Y Gabriela for both "Rango" and “Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides.” Of course, we don't have to tell you that the man behind the excellent scores for (the Oscar nominated) "Inception" and "The Dark Knight" is preparing "The Dark Knight Rises," and he's already given a peek behind the curtain, saying that influences as disparate as Verdi and Alison Goldfrapp are playing a role in the composition. But this year, he won't be making his way to the Kodak Theater.

Eric Bana To Play The King In Cary Elwes' Directorial Debut 'Elvis & Nixon'

  • By Simon Dang
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  • October 24, 2011 1:21 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Danny Huston In Talks To Star As President NixonAs if the art of acting wasn't difficult enough, how about taking on a character that would lay claim to being the most regularly portrayed and impersonated in real life and a role that warrants it's own lengthy section on Wikipedia dedicated to listing all the people who played the exact same part on screen in the past? That's the challenge fronting Eric Bana who will soon play Elvis Presley in Cary Elwes' directorial debut, "Elvis & Nixon."

Nathan Fillion Reveals New, Mysterious Joss Whedon Project 'Much Ado About Nothing'

  • By Simon Dang
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  • October 24, 2011 1:02 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Update: Joss Whedon has sent out a press release about the project saying, “The text is to me a deconstruction of the idea of love, which is ironic, since the entire production is a love letter, to the text, to the cast, even to the house it’s shot in.” Shot in 12 days in Santa Monica, the low-budget film will hit the festival circuit next year “because it is fancy.” The casting is as follows: Amy Acker and Alexis Denisof are Beatrice and Benedick; Nathan Fillion is Dogberry, Clark Gregg is Leonato, Fran Kranz is Claudio and Reed Diamong is Don Pedro.

Producer Brian Grazer Says $40-50 Million Cut From 'Dark Tower' Budget Means "It's Gonna Get Made"

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • October 23, 2011 11:45 AM
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  • 14 Comments
Says Revamped Approach Gives The Movie A "Satisfying Ending"EXCLUSIVE: Universal may have turned off the lights on "The Dark Tower," but producer Brian Grazer, screenwriter Akiva Goldsman and director Ron Howard are still hard at work on developing the property. Universal's worry about the Stephen King adaptation stemmed not only from the mammoth cost, but also the unprecedented vision, with a planned three-film cycle coupled with a television series to bridge the events of each picture. Last we heard the search was for outside financing, and then team with a studio to distribute the film. But, if the project is massively downgraded in scope, will studios be more eager to jump aboard?

FNC ’11: Alexander Sokurov’s 'Faust' An Odd, Dense Adaptation Of Goethe's Classic

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • October 23, 2011 6:38 AM
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  • 0 Comments
By Nikola Grozdanovic reporting from the Festival du Nouveau Cinema in Montreal.

NYFF Review: 'Goodbye First Love' Looks At Young Romance Without Affection

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • October 23, 2011 6:25 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Television and movies love to indulge us in pre-adulthood nostalgia. Whether the bait is loose (young hooligans causing a ruckus) or more specific and event-oriented (prom, which we've seen less of lately because, well, prom sucks), the powers that be tug at our heartstrings and force us to look back at a time free of major responsibilities and full of fresh experiences. The glazed schmaltz can be off-putting for some, but occasionally sincerity shines through and we get something that captures the emotions extraordinarily well (for this writer's money, "The Virgin Suicides" and "The Girl" are uneven but nail certain feelings on the head). But if we look back without this fondness, what are these stories? Are they merely just happenings that somehow affected the person we become, or are they just the product of naive children that didn't know better? Mia Hansen-Løve's "Goodbye First Love" attempts a critical look at a teenager's first relationship without wooing us first with their blithe beginnings, but has very little to say about the topic.

LFF '11 Review: 'Wild Bill' Is An Immensely Likable Directorial Debut From Dexter Fletcher

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 23, 2011 5:30 AM
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  • 0 Comments
For whatever reason, directorial debuts by British character actors tend to lean towards the gritty kitchen-sink drama; Tim Roth, Gary Oldman and, more recently, Paddy Considine have all broken their filmmaking cherry with uncompromisingly tough, bleak subject matter. Considering that it involves abandonment, council estates and the risk of being taken into care, one might be forgiven for expecting the same from Dexter Fletcher's first film, "Wild Bill." But then, Fletcher's best known for being one of the central quartet, alongside Jason Statham, Jason Flemyng and Nick Moran, in Guy Ritchie's debut "Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels," and for appearing frequently in Matthew Vaughn's pictures, so could Fletcher have turned out some kind of guns and geezers movie instead?

Weekend Box Office: 'Paranormal Activity 3' Collects All-Time Biggest Horror Opening

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • October 23, 2011 4:34 AM
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  • 5 Comments
Clearly, there are some bonafide ad wizards over at Paramount after this weekend’s $54 million performance by “Paranormal Activity 3.” While the franchise appears to have its share of detractors, with some growing tired of the “found footage” subgenre, this picture carried surprisingly-generous critic notices to the all-time biggest horror film opening of all time (besting, natch, “Paranormal Activity 2”). Despite what looks like a down market, count this debut as one of the most genuinely strong this year.

Wim Wenders Discusses Painful 'Hammett' Collaboration With Coppola, Friendship With Nicholas Ray

  • By Edward Davis
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  • October 22, 2011 11:16 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Filmmaker Talks 5-Hour Version Of 'End Of The World,' Sam Shepard, Unfinished Version Of 'Hammet' & More At NYFF Q&AWim Wenders' route to filmmaking was a circuitous one. At the age of 21, he landed in Paris determined to become a painter, but cinema had been in his DNA from an early age. He made super 8 movies as a child and became a local neighborhood projectionist at the age of 6 when he inherited his father’s antique film equipment; so cinema seemed like a natural path. But for years, he turned his back on movies, and it wasn't until he saw an Anthony Mann retrospective -- sidetracked from his painting aspirations in a Paris cinematheque -- that he began to fully understand that cinema had its own authors and "had a language of its own.” He then began a 40-year affair with the medium that continues to this day.

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