Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

The Playlist

NYFF Review: 'Goodbye First Love' Looks At Young Romance Without Affection

  • By Christopher Bell
  • |
  • October 23, 2011 6:25 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Television and movies love to indulge us in pre-adulthood nostalgia. Whether the bait is loose (young hooligans causing a ruckus) or more specific and event-oriented (prom, which we've seen less of lately because, well, prom sucks), the powers that be tug at our heartstrings and force us to look back at a time free of major responsibilities and full of fresh experiences. The glazed schmaltz can be off-putting for some, but occasionally sincerity shines through and we get something that captures the emotions extraordinarily well (for this writer's money, "The Virgin Suicides" and "The Girl" are uneven but nail certain feelings on the head). But if we look back without this fondness, what are these stories? Are they merely just happenings that somehow affected the person we become, or are they just the product of naive children that didn't know better? Mia Hansen-Løve's "Goodbye First Love" attempts a critical look at a teenager's first relationship without wooing us first with their blithe beginnings, but has very little to say about the topic.

LFF '11 Review: 'Wild Bill' Is An Immensely Likable Directorial Debut From Dexter Fletcher

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • October 23, 2011 5:30 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
For whatever reason, directorial debuts by British character actors tend to lean towards the gritty kitchen-sink drama; Tim Roth, Gary Oldman and, more recently, Paddy Considine have all broken their filmmaking cherry with uncompromisingly tough, bleak subject matter. Considering that it involves abandonment, council estates and the risk of being taken into care, one might be forgiven for expecting the same from Dexter Fletcher's first film, "Wild Bill." But then, Fletcher's best known for being one of the central quartet, alongside Jason Statham, Jason Flemyng and Nick Moran, in Guy Ritchie's debut "Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels," and for appearing frequently in Matthew Vaughn's pictures, so could Fletcher have turned out some kind of guns and geezers movie instead?

Weekend Box Office: 'Paranormal Activity 3' Collects All-Time Biggest Horror Opening

  • By Gabe Toro
  • |
  • October 23, 2011 4:34 AM
  • |
  • 5 Comments
Clearly, there are some bonafide ad wizards over at Paramount after this weekend’s $54 million performance by “Paranormal Activity 3.” While the franchise appears to have its share of detractors, with some growing tired of the “found footage” subgenre, this picture carried surprisingly-generous critic notices to the all-time biggest horror film opening of all time (besting, natch, “Paranormal Activity 2”). Despite what looks like a down market, count this debut as one of the most genuinely strong this year.

Wim Wenders Discusses Painful 'Hammett' Collaboration With Coppola, Friendship With Nicholas Ray

  • By Edward Davis
  • |
  • October 22, 2011 11:16 AM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
Filmmaker Talks 5-Hour Version Of 'End Of The World,' Sam Shepard, Unfinished Version Of 'Hammet' & More At NYFF Q&AWim Wenders' route to filmmaking was a circuitous one. At the age of 21, he landed in Paris determined to become a painter, but cinema had been in his DNA from an early age. He made super 8 movies as a child and became a local neighborhood projectionist at the age of 6 when he inherited his father’s antique film equipment; so cinema seemed like a natural path. But for years, he turned his back on movies, and it wasn't until he saw an Anthony Mann retrospective -- sidetracked from his painting aspirations in a Paris cinematheque -- that he began to fully understand that cinema had its own authors and "had a language of its own.” He then began a 40-year affair with the medium that continues to this day.

LFF '11 Review: Michael Winterbottom's 'Trishna' Is Picturesque, But Entirely Lacking In Passion

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • October 22, 2011 7:28 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Over his career, Michael Winterbottom has hopped frequently from genre to genre, from subject matter to subject matter, rarely covering the same territory twice. But one of the few things he has returned to is the work of Thomas Hardy. The late 19th century British author has so far inspired two of the director's films: 1995's "Jude," an adaptation of "Jude the Obscure" with Kate Winslet, and "The Claim," a version of "The Mayor of Casterbridge" moved to a Californian mountain Western setting.

Austin Film Festival ‘11 Review: 'The Rum Diary' Starts Out Charming, Until The Buzz Wears Off

  • By The Playlist
  • |
  • October 22, 2011 4:36 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
-- by William Goss

Watch: Trailer For Angelina Jolie's Directorial Debut 'In The Land Of Blood And Honey'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • October 21, 2011 12:33 PM
  • |
  • 19 Comments
Well, it looks like the Oscar race just got a major shakeup. Though it was slated for a release date in December way back in the spring, Angelina Jolie's upcoming directorial debut "In The Land Of Blood And Honey" has been a completely unknown element. With no festival appearances, and a lack of stills and promotional material, it was left up to speculation if the film was a misguided vanity project, a true awards season contender or something else entirely. Well, a very meaty trailer has now landed online and Jolie looks to have delivered something that could change up the game this fall.

With David Yates Out, Warner Eyes Ben Affleck For Stephen King's 'The Stand'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • October 21, 2011 11:22 AM
  • |
  • 7 Comments
There is no doubt that Warner Bros. loves Ben Affleck. The actor/director has brought the studio critical acclaim with "The Town," and he's already behind the camera on his next effort for the studio "Argo." But before that film got underway, WB had already passed movies like "Man Of Steel" and "Gangster Squad" his way as potential projects, and while he turned those down, it looks like they've nabbed him for what will be his first bonafide tentpole picture.

'Game of Thrones' & 'Killing' Stars Kit Harington & Joel Kinnaman Lead Race For 'Arthur & Lancelot'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • October 21, 2011 10:51 AM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
For the moment, David Dobkin's "Arthur & Lancelot" is mostly known as being the fantasy pic that killed both Bryan Singer and Guy Ritchie's competing "Excalibur" remakes at Warner Bros. With a project that was further along, WB threw their weight behind "Wedding Crashers" director David Dobkin's pic and with shooting scheduled to begin next year, they are beginning to start casting it up and as usual, a plethora of names have come out of the woodwork.

‘Fast and the Furious 6 & 7' May Deliver One Big Linked Story

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • October 21, 2011 10:01 AM
  • |
  • 7 Comments
Release Date Might Be Pushed Back To Accommodate Filming & EditingThis shit just went from mission:impossible to mission: in freaking sanity!

Email Updates

Recent Comments