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The Playlist

Soundtrack To 'The Rum Diary' Announced, Features Musical Contributions From Johnny Depp

  • By Todd Gilchrist
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  • October 10, 2011 11:05 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Release Includes Score By Christopher Young, Plus Cuts From Dean Martin & Patti SmithHey, you know a movie that we keep forgetting is coming out soon? "The Rum Diary." The long-in-the-works adaptation of Hunter S. Thompson's book, which sees Johnny Depp return to the part of the author, which he previously played in "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas," is slightly over two weeks from release, but, having skipped the festival circuit entirely (not a particularly good sign...), the publicity machine has been fairly quiet for Bruce Robinson's film, considering it stars the planet's biggest movie star.

Mary Elizabeth Winstead Says Reshoots On 'The Thing' Were To Help Punch Up The Story & Ending

  • By Jeff Otto
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  • October 10, 2011 10:58 AM
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  • 1 Comment
While fans and followers of John Carpenter's seminal "The Thing" are quick to dismiss anything that dares to touch the hallowed material of the horror maestro, even the strictest purists have to admit to at least a morbid curiosity in Matthijs van Heijiningen Jr.’s forthcoming prequel to the 1982 film.

Watch: Trailer For Phoenix Documentary 'From A Mess To The Masses'

  • By Todd Gilchrist
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  • October 10, 2011 10:39 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Who doesn't love French indie-rockers Phoenix? Oh, we're sure they'll be dismissed as some as hipsterish, but there's a joyfulness to their records that make them transcend any hipster connotations, and they seem to get better, and more popular with time. Hell, Sofia Coppola loved them so much so she put one of their songs in "Lost in Translation," married the frontman, Thomas Mars, and got the band to score her last movie "Somewhere."

Luke Evans Says Edgar Allan Poe Thriller 'The Raven' Doesn't Shy On The Blood & Gore

  • By Todd Gilchrist
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  • October 10, 2011 9:56 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Since starting his acting career proper in 2003, Luke Evans has seemed to spend more time in period attire than in any other clothing: from “Clash of the Titans” to “Robin Hood” to “The Three Musketeers,” he’s repeatedly transformed himself into a muscular, mustachioed monolith of a man who is more comfortable in animal pelts than leather jackets. But even with several other projects in the pipeline which require him to start sentences with “ye olde…,” including “Immortals,” “The Raven,” and two “Hobbit” prequels, Evans insists that it’s just the scripts, and not the buckling swashes, that draw him to this series of anachronistic projects.

NYFF: Simon Curtis Discusses Recreating Marilyn Monroe For 'My Week With Marilyn'

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • October 10, 2011 9:27 AM
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  • 0 Comments
“My Week With Marilyn” tells the story of Colin Clark, a third assistant director on the set of “The Prince And The Showgirl” who served as mediator between star Marilyn Monroe and the frustrated cast and crew. However, if you heard it from Clark’s memoirs, published long after Monroe’s passing, there was more than just a working relationship between the two of them.

Martin Scorsese's 'Hugo' Is Secret Work-In-Progress Screening At NYFF Tonight, New Featurette Debuts

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 10, 2011 7:24 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Speculation has been rife over the last couple of days among Big Apple-based film fans as to the possible identity of the secret screening that the New York Film Festival added to their program as a last-minute surprise last week. The festival narrowed it down a little, saying that the film was a "work-in-progress" from a "master filmmaker" for a film that would be released before the end of the 2011, so it left only a few contenders. Could it be David Fincher's "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo?" Stephen Daldry's "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close?" Mike Mitchell's "Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked?"

Béla Tarr Confirms At NYFF That He's Retired From Filmmaking

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 10, 2011 6:47 AM
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  • 1 Comment
We can't claim to be massive fans of everything that Béla Tarr's made; his work can be fascinating, but somewhat trying. But when he's firing on all cylinders, as in "Werckmeister Harmonies," the Hungarian director is an incredibly vital voice in cinema, and even when he's not, his films find a way of indelibly printing themselves on your mind. As such, we were disappointed to learn back in 2008, on the announcement of Tarr's latest project, that it was intended to be his last.

Review: 'Trespass' Is a Hopelessly Uninspired Home Invasion Thriller

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • October 10, 2011 5:47 AM
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  • 1 Comment
With a speaking voice that often (and unexpectedly) devolves into histrionic yelps and an assortment of goofy, ever-changing hair pieces, Nicolas Cage has become such a creative loose cannon you often want to check in on his latest effort in the off chance that he’s delivered some creative crazy good (“Bad Lieutenant: Port of New Orleans”) instead of the crazy mediocre that seems to be the norm (almost everything else he does).

Mickey Rourke And Kellan Lutz To Co-Star In Indonesian Actioner 'Java Heat'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 10, 2011 5:01 AM
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  • 4 Comments
There's a long history of Hollywood plundering Asian action stars for their own, from Bruce Lee to Jay Chou, but aside from the occasional exception (who could forget Paul Rudd in "Gen-Y Cops?" Answer: everyone), the exchange rarely works the other way. But with investment from China and elsewhere becoming more and more important, the balance is starting to tip a little. Kevin Spacey is starring in Chinese picture "Inseparable" and Christian Bale took the lead in Zhang Yimou's "The Flowers Of War," while Nicolas Winding Refn and Ryan Gosling are heading East for the Bangkok-set "Only God Forgives."

Review: ‘Texas Killing Fields’ Is Often Intense & Bruising, But Ultimately Frustrating & Uneven

  • By The Playlist
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  • October 10, 2011 4:15 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Exhibiting immense technique, incredibly moody, tense atmospheres and meticulously crafted aesthetics, the dark crime thriller, “Texas Killing Fields,” demonstrates that director Ami Canaan Mann has inherited some serious skills from her famous filmmaking father Michael Mann.

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