Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

The Playlist

Béla Tarr Confirms At NYFF That He's Retired From Filmmaking

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • October 10, 2011 6:47 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
We can't claim to be massive fans of everything that Béla Tarr's made; his work can be fascinating, but somewhat trying. But when he's firing on all cylinders, as in "Werckmeister Harmonies," the Hungarian director is an incredibly vital voice in cinema, and even when he's not, his films find a way of indelibly printing themselves on your mind. As such, we were disappointed to learn back in 2008, on the announcement of Tarr's latest project, that it was intended to be his last.

Review: 'Trespass' Is a Hopelessly Uninspired Home Invasion Thriller

  • By Drew Taylor
  • |
  • October 10, 2011 5:47 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
With a speaking voice that often (and unexpectedly) devolves into histrionic yelps and an assortment of goofy, ever-changing hair pieces, Nicolas Cage has become such a creative loose cannon you often want to check in on his latest effort in the off chance that he’s delivered some creative crazy good (“Bad Lieutenant: Port of New Orleans”) instead of the crazy mediocre that seems to be the norm (almost everything else he does).

Mickey Rourke And Kellan Lutz To Co-Star In Indonesian Actioner 'Java Heat'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • October 10, 2011 5:01 AM
  • |
  • 4 Comments
There's a long history of Hollywood plundering Asian action stars for their own, from Bruce Lee to Jay Chou, but aside from the occasional exception (who could forget Paul Rudd in "Gen-Y Cops?" Answer: everyone), the exchange rarely works the other way. But with investment from China and elsewhere becoming more and more important, the balance is starting to tip a little. Kevin Spacey is starring in Chinese picture "Inseparable" and Christian Bale took the lead in Zhang Yimou's "The Flowers Of War," while Nicolas Winding Refn and Ryan Gosling are heading East for the Bangkok-set "Only God Forgives."

Review: ‘Texas Killing Fields’ Is Often Intense & Bruising, But Ultimately Frustrating & Uneven

  • By The Playlist
  • |
  • October 10, 2011 4:15 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Exhibiting immense technique, incredibly moody, tense atmospheres and meticulously crafted aesthetics, the dark crime thriller, “Texas Killing Fields,” demonstrates that director Ami Canaan Mann has inherited some serious skills from her famous filmmaking father Michael Mann.

Netflix Change Their Minds Again, Scrap Qwikster, No Longer Splitting Into Two Companies

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • October 10, 2011 3:30 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Things have been pretty rosy for Netflix these last few years. Starting as a humble VHS-rental company in 1998, they swiftly became the market leader in DVD rentals, helping to pretty much bury Blockbuster, delivering one billion discs by 2007, and reaching 23.6 million subscribers as of April this year. They've also been ahead of the game in delivering a streaming system, which is, after all, where the home video market is heading, and have become the first stop for film fans looking for online content. And 2011 was going pretty well for them; they announced plans to roll out in Europe in 2012, and are going to be producing their own high content with big names involved, starting with the David Fincher/Kevin Spacey collaboration "House of Cards" next year.

NYFF: Joe Berlinger & Bruce Sinofsky Talk Ethics, Media & Witch-Hunts In The West Memphis Three Docs

  • By The Playlist
  • |
  • October 10, 2011 2:59 AM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
Documentary Filmmakers Of The 'Paradise Lost' Movies Talk The Challenges Of Making Films About Wrongly Convicted MenIt’s not easy to distill the story of the West Memphis Three and the three “Paradise Lost” documentaries (though reading our review of “Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory” might provide some pretty good context).

Ray Manzarek's Book About Jim Morrison Faking His Death Is Being Turned Into A Movie

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • October 10, 2011 2:30 AM
  • |
  • 8 Comments
This writer would certainly rather watch something or read about the history of The Doors than actually listen to them, the band's history, and particularly that of charismatic front-man Jim Morrison providing enough material for Oliver Stone to make his 1991 biopic, "The Doors" (even if it's a rather lesser entry in the director's ouevre). Two decades on, it seems that another Morrison-centered project may be heading to the big screen, one that actually comes from one of his bandmates, no less, and one taking a more fantastical look at the musician.

Director Sean Durkin Talks Food, Violence And Open Endings In 'Martha Marcy May Marlene'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • October 10, 2011 2:00 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
All The Lowdown From The NYFF Screening Of One Of The Year's Best FilmsIt may feel like you've been hearing about "Martha Marcy May Marlene" all year; the film, the debut of director Sean Durkin (who was the producer of Antonio Campos' underseen "Afterschool"), bowed at Sundance, and has spent the last nine months picking up new fans at every subsequent festival, from Cannes to Toronto, and launching its young star, Elizabeth Olsen, into stardom. And take it from someone who finally saw the film last week; the praise is much deserved.

Director Jim Sheridan Didn't Like 'Dream House' Either, Tried To Take Name Off Film

  • By Catherine Scott
  • |
  • October 10, 2011 1:30 AM
  • |
  • 5 Comments
Could Direct 'Sheriff Street Stories' About Childhood In Ireland NextIt's always disappointing when strong directors come out with a film that is absolutely terrible. Jim Sheridan's "Dream House," with an 8% critics' rating on Rotten Tomatoes and only $14.5 million dollars in box office so far, initially had a boatload of promise with charismatic stars Daniel Craig, Rachel Weisz and Naomi Watts, but what we saw was terrifyingly bad (and not because trailers promised a horror story à la Stanley Kubrick's "The Shining"). And just as everyone was beginning to wonder what had happened, besides the extensive reshoots, the LA Times reported late last week that Sheridan wanted his name taken off the final film.

Tim Roth Joins Cillian Murphy In 'Broken,' Film Debut Of Theater Director Rufus Norris

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • October 10, 2011 1:03 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
Actor Also Joins Peter Mullan In Hitman Flick 'The Liability'Tim Roth's got to be looking over at old pal and compatriot Gary Oldman with a little envy right now. Roth might have found moderate success on U.S. TV with "Lie To Me" (and he's been signed to a deal with Fox TV for another series), but his co-star in "Meantime" and "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead" is appearing in billion-dollar "Harry Potter" and "Batman" movies and looking like a serious potential to be a Best Actor nominee at the Oscars for his amazing performance in "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy."

Email Updates

Recent Comments