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The Playlist

D.J. Caruso Herds 'The Goats' For His Next Film

  • By Benjamin Wright
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  • October 3, 2011 2:41 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Update: Variety reports Val Kilmer, Radha Mitchell and Kate Maberly have also joined the film. Kilmer and Mitchell will play parents in the movie, with Maberly taking the role of a camp counselor.

Kylie Minogue Has A Role In 'Holly Motors' The New Film By Leos Carax Starring Juliette Binoche

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • October 3, 2011 2:23 AM
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  • 4 Comments
While Kylie Minogue rose to worldwide fame thanks to the breakout album Fever, whose smash hit "Can't Get You Out Of My Head" finally brought the singer the kind of stateside notice Aussie and Europe audiences had already showered on the singer, what many don't know is that before Minogue strutted her stuff on stages around the world, she got her start as an actress. And for those down under, she is still just as well known for her role on the long running soap opera "Neighbours." Well, it seems Minogue is taking an earnest stride back into her first profession (and yes, she has taken roles here and there over the years, most notably in Baz Luhrmann's "Moulin Rouge").

Craig Brewer Says He's Looking At His Own Marriage As Inspiration For 'Tarzan'

  • By Todd Gilchrist
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  • October 3, 2011 2:03 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Craig Brewer, director of the upcoming reimagining of “Footloose,” told The Playlist over the weekend that he recently finished his latest draft on a new script about Edgar Rice Burroughs’ iconic jungle-dweller, Tarzan. But while the commercial promise of his current film heralds good things for future ones, he said he isn’t counting his chickens before they’re hatched.

Martin Scorsese's Cut Of 'Margaret' Longer Than Current Version; Producer Turned Down TIFF Premiere

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • October 3, 2011 1:44 AM
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  • 1 Comment
After six years of legal battles and editing bay drama, Fox Searchlight finally released Kenneth Lonergan's long awaited "Margaret" this weekend in a handful of theaters. Pushed by a marketing campaign that could generously be called "modest," the film opened to fairly dismal numbers and even though it will rollout to more cities next weekend, the extended imbroglio seems to earned the movie a quiet death. Except, in the court of law, the saga of "Margaret" is not over (more on that in a second) but moreover, for anyone who has seen the film, the news that a longer version of Lonergan's film never made it to screens will be an added frustration to a picture that flirts with greatness only to become unhinged in its wild second half (indeed, it split The Playlist team in half).

Last-Minute Reshoots Saved James Franco's Character From Death In 'Rise of the Planet of the Apes'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 3, 2011 1:19 AM
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  • 2 Comments
We're not sure that there was a bigger surprise this year than "Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes." A tired franchise, from a creative-interference-happy studio, with a green director and a plot straight from "Deep Blue Sea?" Even without the initially unpromising trailers, it looked like a late-summer flop. But happily, it was nothing of the kind: the film became easily the warmest-received blockbusters of the summer, launched director Rupert Wyatt onto the A-list, and has taken an impressive $400 million haul; not bad for a film that allegedly cost less than many of its tentpole competitors. A franchise was (re)born.

Weekend Box Office: 'Dolphin Tale' Flips Over Another Batch Of Weak New Releases To Score #1

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • October 2, 2011 4:38 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Break it down however you want, but its simple economics. The last month has been absolutely saturated with product, so few of it appealing to mainstream America. These movies aren’t bad. And, in most cases, the marketing isn’t all that faulty. It’s pure numbers. The market can’t withstand this over-saturation. In September, eighteen films entered wide release of 1500 or more theaters, and only six crossed $30 million domestic, two of them benefiting from inflated 3D prices. That’s a poor record of success, even as we keep the bar exactly that low.

NYFF '11 Review: 'Tahrir' Is A Must-See Account Of The Egyptian Uprising

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • October 2, 2011 3:50 AM
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  • 2 Comments
The "Arab Spring" -- a term frequently used to describe the various countries in the Middle East rising against their much-maligned leaders -- rages on in full force. Though the wave of revolution is powerful, the media tends to be very selective in its coverage, focusing on one country before quickly moving onto another. You can't blame someone if they just assumed Egypt was just dandy now given the lack of coverage, as Libya's the new paramour.

NYFF '11 Review: 'We Can't Go Home Again' Is A Maddening, Fascinating Effort From Nicholas Ray

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • October 2, 2011 3:06 AM
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  • 0 Comments
In 1971 Nicholas Ray, former Hollywood director of "Rebel Without a Cause" and "Bigger Than Life," accepted a teaching position at Harpur College of Arts and Sciences at SUNY Binghamton University in upstate New York. At the time the university was seen as the epicenter of experimental and avant-garde art (the film program at Binghamton having been started by renowned experimental filmmaker Ken Jacobs). At some point during his two-year tenure, Ray moved into a house off campus with a group of his students and began collaborating on "We Can't Go Home Again," a project that would screen at Cannes in 1973 but was tinkered with, by Ray, until his death from cancer in 1979.

Review: ‘Finding Joe’ Visually Explores Influence Of Mythologist/Teacher/Writer Joseph Campbell

  • By Jeff Otto
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  • October 1, 2011 12:04 PM
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  • 0 Comments
“I don’t believe people are looking for the meaning of life as much as they are looking for the experience of being alive.” - Joseph Campbell
More: Review

NYFF ‘11 Review: Scorsese's George Harrison 'Material World' Doc Is A Moving & Striking Portrait

  • By The Playlist
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  • October 1, 2011 8:11 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Rock 'n' roll and Academy-Award-winning Italian American filmmaker Martin Scorsese are inextricably linked. After decades of creating striking pictures soundtracked to the likes of the Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton, and the Phil Spector-produced Girl Group strut and constructing documentaries about some of the biggest giants in contemporary music -- Bob Dylan ("No Direction Home:Bob Dylan"), The Band ("The Last Waltz") and the Stones ("Shine a Light") -- Scorsese finally turned his gaze to one titan in rock he had yet to cross paths with, The Beatles. Or more specifically in this case, the enigmatic "quiet" Beatle, George Harrison (though trainspotters will note that "What Is Life" is briefly featured in "Goodfellas").

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