The Playlist

'Community' Star Alison Brie & 'Party Down' Star Lizzy Caplan Team For Rom-Com 'Save The Date'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • June 3, 2011 1:44 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Martin Starr & Geoffrey Arend Co-StarUpdate: Mark Webber, last seen playing Stephen Stills in "Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World," has also joined the cast.

Olivia Wilde, Ben Barnes, J.K. Simmons & John Hannah Join Bradley Cooper In 'The Words'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • June 3, 2011 1:18 AM
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  • 0 Comments
If there was any doubt before that Bradley Cooper is a fully-fledged movie star, the first few months of 2011 have wiped that away: he took an underdog genre picture "Limitless," sold almost entirely on his name, to an impressive gross of nearly $150 million worldwide, while "The Hangover Part II" overcame its poisonous reviews to make nearly that much in only a week of release in the U.S. alone. And, while we're not convinced of his charms just yet (he comes across as a little smug), Cooper's certainly made some interesting choices with his stardom.

Matt Dillon, Brendan Fraser & Craig Robinson Join 'Freaky Deaky'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 2, 2011 10:56 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Slowly coming together over the last 10 months or so, it looks like the Elmore Leonard adaptation, "Freaky Dreaky," is finally moving full steam ahead. The project first started picking up steam during TIFF last year when William H. Macy signed to the film. A number of names then followed, rumored to be circling the project, but not until now has the full crew for the twisty crime tale been assembled.

Watch: Chimps Go Ape In 'Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes' Trailer

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 2, 2011 10:10 AM
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  • 11 Comments
BRAAAAAAAAAHM! BRAAAAAAAAAHM! BRAAAAAAAAAHM! BRAAAAAAAAAHM! You hear that? Nope, it's not the trailer for "Inception," it's the copycat sound design used by every tentpole film now -- yeah, we're looking at you "Battle: Los Angeles" and "Transformers: Dark of the Moon" -- and that appears right in the midst of the latest spot for "Rise of the Planet of the Apes."

Interview: Richard Ayoade Talks Influences Of 'Submarine' And His Take On 'The Double'

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • June 2, 2011 10:01 AM
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  • 5 Comments
Arguably best known as the man responsible for the Channel 4 faux-'80s sci-fi parody "Garth Marenghi's Dark Place" and as the shouting nerd Moss in "The IT Crowd," you've likely seen British comedian Richard Ayoade's work behind the camera, yet been completely unaware. The Arctic Monkeys have recruited his talent for a triple-threat of songs ("Fluorescent Adolescent," "Crying Lightning," "Cornerstone"), not to mention they commissioned him to direct their live show "At The Apollo"; indie-pop staples Super Furry Animals put him to work for "Run Away" which starred BFF Matt Berry; and hipster approved group "Vampire Weekend" hired Ayoade to helm videos for debut album singles "Oxford Comma" and "Cape Cod Kwassa Kwassa." So yeah, not exactly any obscure, Plan-It-X Records musicians on his CV.

Review: 'Rejoice And Shout' Attempts To Cover A Century Of Gospel In 2 Hours

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • June 2, 2011 8:57 AM
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  • 1 Comment
It always seemed like music was the only art where the subject didn't matter. If there's a good beat, a catchy hook, some sort of inventiveness, and/or intensified drive, most don't care what the hell the singer is spewing, even if it's about their specific belief system. Throw a bunch of hard-ass atheists on the dance floor and throw on "Jesus Walks"; see how many stomp their feet and protest (actually, don't, keep reading). There's numerous other examples (how many trendy God-hating teens like Christian-Metalcore band Underoath? Quick answer, too many), but for other mediums, it's not the case. Religious imagery feels too pushy, and while books like the Koran and Old Testament are densely written, good luck finding someone interested in reading it just 'cause.

Review: 'Beautiful Boy' Presents Tragedy As An Acting Exercise

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • June 2, 2011 8:12 AM
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  • 1 Comment
If you were, or still are, a post-millennial creative-type, there’s a chance you channeled the emotions and experiences of events like the Columbine massacre or 9/11 into some form of art. Very few of these ended up being films, books, or songs where audiences found meaning. Several of these people were wise enough to file that screenplay back in the cabinet, never to speak of our attempts at fake grief ever again.

Paramount Picks Up DC Comic 'The Mighty'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 2, 2011 7:51 AM
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  • 1 Comment
With Disney swooping in and paying $4 billion for Marvel Entertainment and buying out the remaining distribution deal the comic company had with Paramount, it was only a matter of time before the mountain logo company started getting back in the game of comic movies. After all, there's money to be had.

Review: 'Submarine’ Is A Smart & Sharp Coming-Of-Age Comedy & A Promising Debut

  • By Cory Everett
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  • June 2, 2011 7:34 AM
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  • 1 Comment
One of the best films at this year's Sundance Film Festival was one that actually had its debut at last year’s TIFF. Richard Ayoade’s “Submarine” is a remarkably assured debut filled with dry humor, inventive visual wit and great performances. Adapted by Ayoade from a 2008 coming-of-age novel by Joe Dunthorne, the film follows 15 year old Oliver Tate (a perfectly cast Craig Roberts), a somewhat delusional teenager who believes himself to be a literary genius, (he reads Nietzsche and searches the dictionary for new words), but in actuality is a social outcast who gets bullied at school and doesn’t know how to talk to girls. Oliver develops a crush on classmate Jordana (a wickedly good Yasmin Paige), an emotionally guarded pyromaniac, who initially agrees to go out with him only to make her ex-boyfriend jealous.

The Essentials: The 5 Best Ewan McGregor Performances

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • June 2, 2011 6:42 AM
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  • 22 Comments
After spending much of the last decade in some of the worst theatrically-released movies around ("Cassandra's Dream?" "Stay?" "Incendiary?" "Deception?" "Amelia?" "Angels & Demons?"), Mike Mills' "Beginners" seems to be the start of a new phase of Ewan McGregor's career. Not only is the film terrific, one of the years' best (read our review here), but McGregor's great in it, the best he's been in years.

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