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The Playlist

The Essentials: The 5 Best Harrison Ford Performances

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 28, 2011 4:03 AM
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  • 8 Comments
For a time in the 1980s and 1990s, Harrison Ford was untouchable, and basically the biggest movie star in the world. He'd cropped up in bits and pieces in the 1970s (most notably small roles in "American Graffiti" and "The Conversation,") but Han Solo turned him into an instant matinee screen idol: he was the beating human heart in George Lucas' "Star Wars," cynical and vulnerable at once, the figure that made all the cosmic silliness fly with audiences, and appropriately became the franchise's biggest break-out star. Only a few years later, lightning struck again, when he was made the last minute replacement for Tom Selleck in Lucas and Steven Spielberg's "Raiders of the Lost Ark," a hall-of-fame action-adventure that would spawn three sequels.

First Look At Newcomer James Howson In Andrea Arnold's 'Wuthering Heights'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • July 28, 2011 3:39 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Andrea Arnold seems to enjoy working with raw, unpolished talent. She directed the completely unknown Katie Jarvis to huge critical praise in "Fish Tank" and the director is hoping to repeat that success with James Howson, another newcomer who landed the lead role in the forthcoming adaptation of "Wuthering Heights."

Interview: 'The Guard' Star Brendan Gleeson Says The McDonagh Brothers Have a Friendly Rivalry

  • By Kimber Myers
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  • July 28, 2011 3:26 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Fueled by an Ennio Morricone-style score by Calexico, "The Guard" is essentially a classic Western set in Connemara, Ireland. If "The Guard" is "High Noon," then that makes star Brendan Gleeson the (much fouler) equivalent of Gary Cooper. Gleefully provoking with comments like, "Why don't you fuck off to America with your Barack O'Fucking Bama?" Gleeson's Gerry Boyle may say--and do--villainous things, but he's the good-hearted soul of this black comedy from director John Michael McDonagh, brother of Martin McDonagh of "In Bruges" fame. Surrounded by corruption, Sergeant Boyle is forced to pair up with a visiting FBI agent (Don Cheadle) to investigate murder and drug trafficking in his small Galway Country town.

Watch: Ryan Gosling Tries To Find Integrity In Politics In Trailer For 'The Ides Of March'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • July 28, 2011 3:17 AM
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  • 7 Comments
In this weekend's "Crazy, Stupid, Love." Ryan Gosling plays a super-confident, smooth-talking, charming ladies' man and it looks like he's reprising that role again only this time, his easy smile and perfect hair will only go so far.

Review: 'Point Blank' Is An Energetic, But Utterly Pointless French Thriller

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • July 28, 2011 3:06 AM
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  • 4 Comments
"French thriller" is one of those phrases, like "German chocolate" and "Swedish pop record," that inspires enthusiastic excitement even when, perhaps, it shouldn't. Take, for example, this week's "Point Blank," directed by Fred Cavayé (whose "Pour Elle" was remade as Paul Haggis' pitiable "The Next Three Days"), which from the outset seemed to carry with it all the trademarks of a great French thriller – energetic, stylish, edgy. It's being marketed as the next "Tell No One," Guillaume Canet's massive crossover hit. But unlike that film, "Point Blank" isn't based on a best selling American novel and also, it's just not very good.
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R.I.P. Producer, Screenwriter & Art Director Polly Platt (1939-2011)

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 28, 2011 2:45 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Sad news broke late yesterday, with the announcement of the death of the film producer, writer and art director Polly Platt, who passed away of Lou Gehrig's disease at the age of 72. Platt's contribution to cinema has been greatly undervalued over the years, but she was someone with a diverse skill-set, who played a key role in a number of classic films.

Janus Films Takes U.S. Rights To Aki Kaurismaki's Cannes Crowd Pleaser 'Le Havre'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 28, 2011 2:26 AM
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  • 1 Comment
While Sundance Selects Grabs Nanni Moretti's 'Habemus Papum'One of the more puzzling outcomes of the Cannes Film Festival has been the failure of Aki Kaurismaki's "Le Havre," which was second only to "The Artist" as far as crowd-pleasing hits on the Croisette go, to land a distributor. Sure, Kaurismaki's never exactly been a cross-over director in the U.S, but his latest, a hilarious, touching look at illegal immigration, picked up outstanding reviews and audience reactions -- we called it a "pure delight."

Alia Shawkat Books Dayton/Faris' 'He Loves Me' & 'Brass Teapot' Starring Juno Temple

  • By Simon Dang
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  • July 28, 2011 2:10 AM
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  • 0 Comments
With rumors of an "Arrested Development" film refusing to die, stars of the defunct Fox show continue to ride the wave of the cult classic. Jason Bateman and Michael Cera have obviously made the most of their time on the Ron Howard-narrated show, but another star is beginning to spread her wings as well.

Review: 'El Bulli: Cooking In Progress' Uses Simplicity To Achieve Quality

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • July 28, 2011 2:07 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Television has always made a great home for food. Various cooking shows populate the airwaves, either becoming a staple of one's TV-diet or the one station you linger on during a desperate channel-surfing session. It also wouldn't be worthy of the tube if it weren't processed through the vomit of reality TV, with shows like "Hell's Kitchen" and "Ace of Cakes" morphing people into exestuated personalities and following their bouncy, sometimes-quirky-sometimes-emotional (whatever gets more ratings) adventures in the eats biz. Still, people watch them, and despite the redundant programming, nobody is exactly screaming for a more realistic study of cuisine and all that makes it happen. It's unfortunate, too, because there's something very fascinating about making what is generally supposed to be only for nourishment artful. Forget something tasting good; there are many eateries that consider food an art form, hoping to stimulate taste buds in different ways while also paying close attention to the presentation of each dish.

Terry Gilliam Working On An Adaptation Of Paul Auster's 'Mr. Vertigo'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • July 28, 2011 1:45 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Perhaps no other filmmaker in recent memory is as talked about for the films they didn't make, as opposed to the ones they did, than director Terry Gilliam. But, you have to admire the man's perseverance. We're now coming on two years since "The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus" and Gilliam has yet to mount another film, not that he hasn't been busy. He's done a couple of food and drink sponsored short films -- "The Legend of Hallowdega" and "The Wholly Family" -- knocked out a webcast for Arcade Fire, and more recently put on a terrific stage version of "The Damnation Of Faust." But it's those old projects that keep coming back to the surface.

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