The Playlist

Tribeca Review: 'Puncture' With Chris Evans A True Story Weighed Down By Oscar Reel Antics

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 27, 2011 3:52 AM
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  • 0 Comments
“Puncture”In 1998, Jeffrey Dancourt created the one-stick syringe, which helped saved the lives of several medical professionals while keeping costs down for supplies in the medical industry. The problem was that the industry, already the beneficiary of multimillion dollar agreements with supplies companies, refused the device. “Puncture” deals with the man’s engagements with two working class lawyers, the only ones willing to take on an un-winnable case against millionaire lawyers and their enormously powerful representatives.
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Lizzy Caplan Says A 'Party Down' Movie Is More Likely Than An 'Arrested Development' Movie

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 27, 2011 3:30 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Exclusive: Oh, "Party Down." Yet another brilliant comedy that shone for a brief moment before getting canceled; ever since going off the air the witty, hilarious sitcom has slowly gained a new audience who are now just catching up with it on DVD. Created and written by John Enbom, Rob Thomas, Dan Etheridge and Paul Rudd, "Party Down" featured an amazing ensemble cast of Adam Scott, Ken Marino, Jane Lynch, Jennifer Coolidge, Megan Mullally, Ryan Hansen, Martin Starr and Lizzy Caplan, and chronicled the travails of an L.A. based catering company made up of actors and writers hoping to make it big, including one who already had a brief taste of the spotlight. The clever concept found the characters catering a different party each episode while the scripts slowly developed the arcs over the course of a season. It was definitely one of the best written shows on television at the time but alas, the ratings were poor and eventually the folks over at Starz gave it the axe.

'NEDS' Director Peter Mullan Almost Helmed 'The Time Traveler's Wife' (Until He Botched The Pitch)

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • April 27, 2011 2:50 AM
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  • 5 Comments
Says 'NEDS' Is 40% Autobiographical & Talks About His Issues With Arthouse CinemaFrom bit parts in "Braveheart" and "Shallow Grave" to winning Best Actor at Cannes for Ken Loach's "My Name Is Joe," not to mention working with Steven Spielberg on the upcoming "War Horse" and securing the role of Death Eater Yaxley for the final two "Harry Potter" films, Scottish actor Peter Mullan has come a long way in a short time. Though he's well-known for his work as an actor, he's had a passion for filmmaking ever since he was 19. His first feature, "Orphans," made rounds at the Venice Film Festival and Paris Film Festival, but it was his sophomore project "The Magdalene Sisters" that really made a splash on the circuit, playing at the Toronto International Film Festival and garnering a nomination for a BAFTA Award. The drama, following three women in an asylum, was a large step forward for the filmmaker in terms of directorial style and substance; the festival-goers that caught it were impressed and eagerly awaited his follow-up.

Watch: Full Length Official Trailer Arrives For 'Immortals'...Yep, Still Looks Like '300'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 27, 2011 2:28 AM
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  • 9 Comments
Update: You can watch the trailer in HD at Apple.

Q&A: Steve Coogan & Rob Brydon Talk 'The Trip,' Differing Improv Styles And Their Onscreen Personas

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • April 27, 2011 2:24 AM
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  • 1 Comment
This world loves bickering buddies. From Laurel and Hardy to Jay and Silent Bob, there's plenty of fondness for comedies built around caustic and amusing back-and-forths between two people that, at the drop of a hat, either want to kill each other or cuddle. Michael Winterbottom, the man responsible for "Welcome to Sarajevo" and the harshly-and-unjustly-criticized "The Killer Inside Me," saw gold in the relationship between his star Steve Coogan ("24 Hour Party People") and friend/comedian Rob Brydon and amplified their personalities for "Tristam Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story." The result was a riot, and things went so well that the three reunited for "The Trip," a BBC2 series and movie.

Review: 'Fast Five' Keeps Enough Fuel In This Aging Franchise To Still Be Fun

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • April 27, 2011 2:06 AM
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  • 11 Comments
It's sort of amazing how dexterous the "Fast and the Furious" franchise has been. Originally conceived as a kind of hot rod version of "Point Break," directed by the perpetually midlife crisis-gripped Rob Cohen, complete with a trashy title lifted from an ancient American International Pictures cheapie, it has evolved over the years, with each successive sequel equipping the original concept of a sturdy undercover cop (Paul Walker) who flirts with the dark side of underground car racing (led by Vin Diesel) with new flourishes. John Singleton helmed the sequel, "2 Fast 2 Furious" and turned it into a live action anime (for better or worse it was a stylistic precursor to the Wachowskis' "Speed Racer"), while current franchise shepherd Justin Lin crafted a nifty "American Graffiti"-style one-off in "Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift," before returning all the principles to the series for the back-to-basics revenge mode of "Fast & Furious."

Milos Forman To Tackle First Financial World Scam Artist In 'Ponzi's Scheme'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 27, 2011 1:45 AM
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  • 3 Comments
It's been quite a while since we last heard from legendary director Milos Forman. His last effort was the not-so-well received "Goya's Ghosts" way back in 2006 but it looks like the man behind "One Flew Over's The Cuckoo's Next," "Loves Of A Blonde," and "Amadeus" isn't done yet and pushing eighty years old, he's still looking to make another run behind the camera, with an interesting take on the financial crisis dramas that seems to be pouring out of Hollywood.

Great Job, Movie Critics: 'Atlas Shrugged' Producer Scrapping Plans For Pt. 2 & 3, Blames Reviews

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 27, 2011 1:32 AM
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  • 34 Comments
God damn, we love writing about "Atlas Shrugged." Even more than "Twilight"-related stories, or the persistent commenter who insists that Scarlett Johansson is the product of stolen DNA, nothing brings out the frothing-at-the-mouth zealots like stories about the long-awaited, independently-produced adaptation of Ayn Rand's magnum opus. Self-financed and distributed by millionaire businessman John Aglialoro, the film was rushed into production to prevent the rights from lapsing, with a decidedly D-list cast and crew, but it did have relevance on its side: with the Tea Party movement, who are perhaps more in step with Rand's beliefs than any major political movement in decades sweeping the nation, could the film find itself becoming a runaway hit? Would we spend the next few years writing about the second and third installments of Aglialoro's dream project?

An Intervention For Jeremy Renner, As He Signs On To 'Ice Age 4,' His 327th Franchise

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 27, 2011 1:16 AM
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  • 16 Comments
Jennifer Lopez, Wanda Sykes, Drake, Aziz Ansari and Keke Palmer Also In CastThe following is the transcription of a speech made by Barry Langford, Jeremy Renner's oldest friend, in a private room at the Sona, on North La Cienega Blvd last night.

Fox Planning Post-Apocalyptic 'Zorro' Reboot, Because Fuck It, They Might As Well

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 27, 2011 1:00 AM
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  • 3 Comments
1998's "The Mask Of Zorro" is, all things considered, a pretty solid action-adventure movie. Not a classic, by any means, but as far as old-fashioned swashbucklers go, it was zippy fun, with about the right blend of action, laughs and romance. Sony clearly hoped that the film would turn the classic folk hero created by Johnston McCulley into a new franchise, but it took them seven years to get a sequel together, and when it arrived, 2005's "The Legend of Zorro" was a mere shadow of the original.

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