The Playlist

New Pics Of Robert Pattinson, Mia Wasikowska & More In David Cronenberg's Cannes Bound 'Maps To The Stars'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 22, 2014 11:37 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Maps To The Stars
While most films headed to Cannes are keeping a tight seal until the lights go down and the projector goes on, that's not the case for David Cronenberg's "Maps To The Stars." That may be due for the fact that the film is opening in a handful of overseas territories this summer, so regardless of the festival, they need to start advertising. And it could be just because the director doesn't really care. Either way, more images from the movie are here.

Tribeca Review: Incendiary Political Documentary '1971'

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 22, 2014 11:25 AM
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  • 0 Comments
1971
On March 8th, 1971, the Citizens Committee To Investigate The FBI convened to break into FBI offices in Media, Pennsylvania. The result, as the new documentary “1971” dares to argue, is a significant, but temporary shift in an ongoing struggle between the general public and the government, one that has waged since war overseas has dared society to question their very own neighbors. The film doesn't bother to hold your hand: if you're an American willing to place blind faith in your elected officials and anyone with a badge, you're not going to cotton to what this film has to show you.

Watch: Alexander Payne's 15-Minute 1985 UCLA Film School Short 'Carmen'

  • By Cain Rodriguez
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  • April 22, 2014 11:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
It’s always fun to see the evolution of a filmmaker’s voice and thanks to the power of the internet we can peer even further back through a director’s body of work. Case in point, an odd short film from Alexander Payne has been unearthed, an effort that was completed over a decade before the “Nebraska” director would get a shot at his feature-length film.

Watch: NSFW Trailer For David Cronenberg's Upcoming Book 'Consumed'

  • By Cain Rodriguez
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  • April 22, 2014 10:38 AM
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  • 1 Comment
In between supervising the new 2K digital film transfer of “Scanners” for Criterion and nabbing a competiting slot in the Cannes Film Festival for “Maps To The Stars,” Canadian provacteur David Cronenberg has found time to write his very first novel, joining the ranks of other directors like Guillermo Del Toro. As is becoming standard in the literary world – at least for larger properties – the novel has its very own trailer, however this one has the benefit of Cronenberg himself at the helm.

Tribeca Review: Mental Illness Drama 'Gabriel' Starring Rory Culkin

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • April 22, 2014 10:20 AM
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Gabriel, Rory Culkin
When "Gabriel," the debut feature from writer/director Lou Howe, begins, it seems like any other romantic drama about two young people who are very in love. Our title character (Rory Culkin) takes a bus out to his girlfriend's dorm. He bangs on her door, a wadded up piece of a letter balled in his fist. When a different girl answers, she informs him that the girl he is looking for doesn't live there, especially when he tells her that the address on the envelope is several years old. "This is a freshman dorm," the girl says. And that's when it becomes very clear that this movie is not your typical romantic drama; it's far more unhinged than that.

Watch: Trailer, Poster And Pics For Korean 'Point Blank' Remake 'The Target' Playing Cannes

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 22, 2014 10:04 AM
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  • 0 Comments
The Target
Before you get too excited, this is not a remake of John Boorman's 1967 film, but rather a Korean do-over of the 2010 French action flick "Point Blank," which also as U.S. redo in the works too. But the singularly named director Chang got there first, and even more, his version is headed to Cannes Film Festival where it will play the midnight lineup (yes, they have a midnight lineup too). And the first trailer is here.

Watch: First Trailer For 'Insecure' Featuring 'Blue Is The Warmest Color' Star Adele Exarchapoulos

  • By Ben Brock
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  • April 22, 2014 9:37 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Que Vive Insecure
We at the Playlist love Adele Exarchapoulos, whose breakthrough role in the Palme d'Or winner “Blue Is The Warmest Colour” brought her to the world's attention last year. Attention has of course translated into more roles, and she's set to appear in Sean Penn's next piece of directing work, “The Last Face," which will start production this summer.

Watch: New Clip From 'Night Moves' With Jesse Eisenberg & Dakota Fanning Wants To Know What Its Dealing With

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 22, 2014 9:17 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Night Moves
There's a million ways for the perfect plan to go wrong, and the trio leading Kelly Reichardt's "Night Moves" are trying to avoid them all. One of our Most Anticipated Films Of The Summer, the low key thriller could be a nice change of pace from the eye-melting, ear-shattering blockbusters coming in the next few months, and another new clip has arrived to give you taste of what's coming.

New Films By John Boorman, Frederick Wiseman, Bruno Dumont & More Set For Cannes Directors' Fortnight

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 22, 2014 9:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Queen And Country
The Cannes Film Festival lineup now has been revealed, the Cannes Critics' Week unfurled their slate and today, the Cannes Directors' Fortnight has lifted the curtain on what they'll be presenting in the south of France next month. And as per usual, it's a mix of arthouse names, established veterans and rising newcomers.

Review: Indie Chiller 'Proxy' Mixes Pop Psychology With Horror Movie Clichés

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • April 21, 2014 7:33 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Proxy
There's something deeply mysterious to some about pregnancy. It's a beautiful, important, wholly miraculous event that still carries with it an element of the unknown. And that element, that nagging itch at the back of every parent or would-be parent's mind, is the kind of thing that is ripe for cinematic exploration. Countless horror movies have played up the fears, both psychological and physiological, that go into pregnancy and the best ("Rosemary's Baby," "Inside," the original "Alien") find a way to a acknowledge the process' specialness while also acknowledging the fear of the unknown. What's interesting about "Proxy" is that it plays with all of the ephemera associated with pregnancy – the way that a person's psychology can warp around it – but too often than not gets bogged down in B-movie clichés and an unnecessarily convoluted narrative that strives for profundity but comes across as crass and dull.

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