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The Playlist

Watch: Take A 3-Minute Journey With Martin Scorsese Through The Masterpieces Of Polish Cinema

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 31, 2014 1:48 PM
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  • 6 Comments
Man Of Iron
While the movie world is filled with great ranconteurs, and filmmakers with a rich knowledge of cinema history (even the unlikely John Landis, as you can find out right here), there are few who come with the breadth, depth and passion for film as Martin Scorsese. And even if you had no interest in Polish cinema, or weren't even aware there was Polish cinema, let Scorsese change your mind.

Check Out Mind-Expanding New Poster & Pics For Ben Wheatley's 'A Field In England'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 31, 2014 1:26 PM
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  • 0 Comments
A Field In England
Movies about drugs, people tripping out on drugs, or that promise a druggy experience as a viewer, are not in short supply, but there are few that actually live up to those promises. However, when Ben Wheatley decides to make a movie set in the Civil War in 17th-Century England, that centers on three deserters who eat some mushrooms and proceed to go on psychedelic trip into magic and madness — well, you're going to get just that.

Jesse Eisenberg & Jeremy Irons Are Lex Luthor & Alfred In Zack Snyder’s 'Batman Vs. Superman'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 31, 2014 12:52 PM
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  • 29 Comments
While the rumor mill churned with Bryan Cranston, and other older, balder actors, it looks like Zack Snyder and co. have thrown a huge curveball to fans when it comes to Lex Luthor, the long expected villain of "Batman Vs. Superman": he's going to be much younger than you thought.

Exclusive: Jennifer Connelly Has A Visitor In Clip From Claudia Llosa's 'Aloft' Premiering At The Berlin Film Festival

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 31, 2014 12:25 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Aloft, Jennifer Connelly
For those who have been keeping an ear to the ground, Claudia Llosa is a filmmaker that has been making some serious noise. Her debut "Madinusa" first made a splash at the Sundance Film Festival in 2006, going on to play around the world, picking up the FIPRESCI Prize of International Critics at the Rotterdam Festival among other prizes. Three years later she returned with the acclaimed "The Milk Of Sorrow," which received the Golden Bear for Best Film at the Berlin Film Festival. She's headed back to the festival shortly, once again in competition, with her latest, "Aloft." And it will be one to keep an eye on.

Sundance Review: Grand Jury Prize-Winning Doc 'Rich Hill' Is A Finely Observed Portrait Of Millenial American Boyhood

  • By Katie Walsh
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  • January 31, 2014 12:02 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Rich Hill, Sundance
In looking at two of the lauded Sundance 2014 documentaries, “The Overnighters” (a Special Jury prize winner; read our review) and “Rich Hill” (which won the Grand Jury Prize), a common theme makes itself apparent, with these two films running parallel to each other in their milieus, but in very different ways. The particular concern is a wrenching, deeply intimate look at a specific kind of American masculinity—a masculinity that is very much in a state of instability. While “The Overnighters” takes up the grown men of the unstable Midwestern lower-middle class seeking riches in the North Dakota oil fields, “Rich Hill” focuses its lens on the boys and young men who might grow up into these oilmen.

Watch: Extensive 2 Hour Talk With Steve McQueen About '12 Years A Slave,' His Filmography, Art & More

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 31, 2014 11:26 AM
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  • 0 Comments
12 Years A Slave
So, we're in that quiet period of the awards season where the nominations are in, and the campaigns start making more measured moves as the Academy gets ready to vote on the Oscars. But with multiplexes mostly filled with the stuff studios would like to forget they financed, now is a good time to dive really deeply into the films and careers of some of this year's nominees. And if you wanted a comprehensive overview of the work of Steve McQueen, we've got a treat for you today.

Exclusive: The Audience Is In Control In Clip From Thriller 'Grand Piano' Starring Elijah Wood

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 31, 2014 11:03 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Grand Piano
On paper, the premise of "Grand Piano" might seem a little silly, following a famed a concert pianist, stricken with stage fright, who attempts to make a comeback after five years only to have an unseen assailant threaten his life if plays a single note wrong. But the result may be far more gripping than you might expect.

Watch: Epic 3-Hour Chat With Director John Landis On J.J. Abrams' 'Super 8,' Lunch With Alfred Hitchcock & More

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
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  • January 31, 2014 10:33 AM
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  • 1 Comment
John Landis
The films of director John Landis are particularly suited to repetition—in both rewatchability for comedies like “Trading Places” or “The Blues Brothers” or horror like “An American Werewolf in London," but also in double-dip DVDs and Blu-rays from Universal every few years as well. Luckily, Landis is one of those filmmakers who reveals a new, fascinating behind-the-scenes tale with each new release, and that is certainly the case surrounding the Blu-ray of “Animal House” a few years back.

Exclusive: Clip From Horror 'Haunt' Takes You To The Edge Of Dark Water

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 31, 2014 10:08 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Haunt
It undoubtedly takes a bit of stones to name your debut horror film "Haunt," but director Mac Carter has done just that. But where that title might suggest a standard concoction of genre tics, the filmmaker instead goes for something atmospheric and unsettling, and it's a tone that comes across in this exclusive clip from the film.

Watch: Sam Peckinpah Discusses Movie Violence In 20-Minute Interview

  • By Cain Rodriguez
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  • January 31, 2014 9:41 AM
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  • 2 Comments
With gun violence still as prevalent as ever and on the heels of Harvey Weinstein’s change of heart regarding violence in movies, it’s still as hard as ever to have a discussion on the role cinema has in dealing with the issue. It’s a debate that was taking place even during the seventies when Sam Peckinpah sat down for a combative nearly half-hour interview with the BBC.

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