Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

The Playlist

Berlin Review: 'Night Train To Lisbon' Chugs And Clanks Along In Old-Fashioned, Uninspired Style

  • By Jessica Kiang
  • |
  • February 17, 2013 10:43 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
In the very finest tradition of europudding, director Bille August's "Night Train To Lisbon" adapts an international bestselling book, takes place against the picturesque backdrop of a European capital, is half-told in flashback through a turbulent and dramatic period of history, and stacks the cast with notable European thesps. These include, Jeremy Irons, Jack Huston, Charlotte Rampling, Christopher Lee, Tom Courtenay representing the U.K.; from Germany, Martina Gedeck and August Diehl; Bruno Ganz of Switzerland; Lena Olin of Sweden; and representing France is Mélanie Laurent. However, bar Irons, this Babel tower of actors all play Portuguese nationals, and so while the films is told through English, they all speak with Portuguese accents.

Interview: Oscar-Nominated ‘Redemption’ Directors Talk The Surprises & Complications Of Following NYC Canners

  • By Drew Taylor
  • |
  • February 17, 2013 10:13 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
If you live in New York City, or have even visited the city, you’ve noticed them: people who dig through trash cans and garbage bags looking for cans that they can use to recycle for cash. They are a marginalized group, sometimes hauling hundreds of pounds of recyclables around. They're also the subject of a fascinating new HBO documentary short called “Redemption,” directed by Jon Alpert and Matthew O’Neill, that is nominated for the Best Documentary Short Oscar next weekend.

The H Is Silent: Watch Christoph Waltz In SNL's Quentin Tarantino Parody 'Djesus Uncrossed'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • February 17, 2013 9:45 AM
  • |
  • 4 Comments
"Saturday Night Live" is in something of a transitional period, one of many in its 30-odd-year history. Last season saw the show's two biggest stars, Kristen Wiig and Andy Samberg depart, with Jason Sudeikis likely to follow at the end of the current season (and Bill Hader and Fred Armisen surely not far behind). At the same time, there's been a hugely promising new intake; Taran Killam is coming into his own, and this season's newcomers Cecily Strong, Kate McKinnon and Aidy Bryant have proven to be goddamn rock stars straight out of the gate.

'Argo' & 'Silver Linings Playbook' Take Top Editing Prizes At ACE Eddie Awards

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • February 17, 2013 9:20 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Seven days left until the Oscars, and the final precursor awards roll out this weekend. Tonight sees the WGA Awards, and last night was the ACE Eddie Awards, run by the organization for film editors, and rewarding the best editing in cinema in 2012.

'Child's Pose' Wins Golden Bear, David Gordon Green & Richard Linklater Take Awards At Berlin Film Festival

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • February 17, 2013 9:20 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Ten days went by like a flash....and just like that, another year has closed on the Berlin International Film Festival. But before jury president Wong Kar-Wai packed his bags, there were some awards to hand out, so get out a pen and paper because these are some films you're going to want to keep on your radar over the coming year.

Berlin Review: The Trials Of 'Camille Claudel 1915' Make For Trying Watching, Even With Juliette Binoche In Peerless Form

  • By Jessica Kiang
  • |
  • February 16, 2013 12:02 PM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Director Bruno Dumont ("The Life of Jesus," "Outside Satan") has made a name for himself with challenging, sometimes controversial films that often feature non-professional actors and considered, not to say glacial, pacing interrupted with scenes of violence. But with "Camille Claudel 1915" he abandons some aspects of that approach while ever more fully indulging others. So for the first time he has a name star in Juliette Binoche, who turns in a reliably committed and remarkably naked performance as the titular Claudel, but here Dumont slows the pace of the action to almost nil, and punctuates it only with long talky tracts until the film becomes either a masterpiece of the "slow and boring" school of cinema, or an occasionally excruciating form of Chinese water torture, depending on your point of view.

First Look At Josh Brolin As Dwight In 'Sin City: A Dame To Kill For'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • February 16, 2013 11:43 AM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
Amid the starry cast, the sexy women and even sexier violence, it's easy to forget that "Sin City," and it's forthcoming sequel "Sin City: A Dame To Kill For," are some impressive feats of technology as well. Robert Rodriguez has devised a rather fascinating approach that both keeps the budget down, but also allows him plenty of creative flexibility and the ability to eliminate any kind of scheduling problems. Shooting mostly on green screen, the "Sin City" films use lots of CGI to give a stylish look at the fraction of the cost of trying to replicate it realistically, and thanks to digital and editing wizardry, cast members don't even have to be standing opposite each other in order to interact. And as he gets 'Dame' ready for release later this year, Rodriguez has given a little sneak preview.

Berlin Review: River Phoenix's Last Film 'Dark Blood' A Serviceable Movie, But A Fascinating Project

  • By Jessica Kiang
  • |
  • February 16, 2013 11:17 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
River Phoenix died at in 1993 at just 23 years of age, and to a certain generation of then-teenage movie fans, of whom this writer was one, it was maybe the first of that kind of celebrity death, the kind you remember where you were when you heard about it. I was in a car with my mom, and I recall the radio report ended with a mention of Federico Fellini's death the same day (at 73 the Italian director, despite his greatness, was always going to be the Farrah Fawcett to Phoenix's Michael Jackson in the coincidental celebrity death stakes). Now 20 years on, the Berlin Film Festival is showing Phoenix's last film, "Dark Blood," by Dutch director George Sluizer (the original "The Vanishing" and his vastly inferior American remake) in unfinished form, and it makes for surprisingly thought-provoking viewing.

What Are You Seeing This Weekend? 'Escape From Planet Earth' With 'A Good Day To Die Hard' & 'Beautiful Creatures'

  • By Emma Bernstein
  • |
  • February 15, 2013 7:11 PM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
Dear faithful readers, we hope you enjoyed your day of stuffed animals, roses, and antacids in the shape of little hearts. Or maybe you just got drunk and ate cheesecake (after which you probably needed a couple of those Rolaids disguised as candy). Holiday traditions are the best, aren't they? Well, in case you didn't get enough of the love, there's plenty going around in theaters this weekend. A(nother) fantastical being falls hard for a(nother) human, John McClane bonds with his son, a call girl finds herself torn between a client and her fiancé, paramours turn pathological in an Indian remake, and one more Nicholas Sparks lovefest sobathon -- er, novel -- gets a silver screen adaptation. Be sure to pack some insulin for the sugar rush, and tell us what you'll be seeing in the comments below!

Watch: Powerful Trailer For Cristian Mungiu's Cannes Prize-Winning 'Beyond The Hills'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • February 15, 2013 5:43 PM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
In just over a week, the Oscars will be over and we'll put 2012 to bed and start focusing on 2013. And while they probably won't get nominated for Oscars, we're willing to bet that Cristina Flutur and Cosmina Stratan will deliver some of the best performances you'll see all year in "Beyond The Hills" (and indeed, they both shared an acting prize at the Cannes Film Festival last year). The latest trailer for Cristian Mungiu's film has arrived, and it's a powerful piece of work.

Email Updates

Recent Comments