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The Playlist

Soundtrack For 'Arbitrage' Includes Score By Cliff Martinez, Songs By Bjork, Billie Holiday & More

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • September 2, 2012 11:41 AM
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  • 3 Comments
If it's one thing we love, it's a great Richard Gere performance. After mistakenly labeling 2002 "The Year of Gere" (due to three fine performances in "The Mothman Prophecies," "Unfaithful," and "Chicago"), it looks like this year might actually live up to our really stupid title. Gere stars in "Arbitrage," where he plays a troubled hedge fund magnate, in a performance many are calling a career-best. And soundtrack details have just emerged for the soundtrack companion album, which features the original score by "Drive"/"Contagion" composer Cliff Martinez and a handful of previously released songs from the likes of Bjork, You Say Party!, Stan Getz, Billie Holiday and Robi Botos.

New Images Debut From 'Flight,' 'Not Fade Away,' 'Trouble With The Curve' & More

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • September 2, 2012 10:46 AM
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  • 0 Comments
As the fall movie season approaches, with the big film festivals bleeding into the Oscar crush and blockbuster Christmas season, we'll be seeing the marketing machine at various studios start to churn into overdrive, most likely coughing sooty smoke and belching flames. And just recently a host of new photos have been unleashed for a number of this fall's more prestigious pics, including Robert Zemeckis' "Flight," David Chase's "Not Fade Away," Brit dramedy "Song For Marion," and the Clint Eastwood vehicle "Trouble with the Curve."

Gerard Butler Revenge Thriller 'Motor City' Suffers Engine Failure

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • September 2, 2012 10:00 AM
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  • 3 Comments
According to Deadline, "Motor City," the revenge thriller from solo Hughes brother Albert Hughes that was originally set to star Dominic Cooper… Then Jake Gyllenhaal… Then Gerard Butler… Has been shut down for good, with the cast being sent home over the weekend. We're pretty sure that this movie accidentally ran over a young gypsy while on vacation in Europe because this shit seems cursed.

Venice Review: Terrence Malick's 'To The Wonder' Is A Raw & Heartfelt Film Of Loss And Longing

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 2, 2012 7:18 AM
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  • 37 Comments
For a man not known for being prolific, an eighteen-month gap between Terrence Malick’s “The Tree of Life” (the filmmaker’s first film in five years) and his latest, “To the Wonder” (only his sixth in forty years) isn’t just unprecedented, it’s positively mind-boggling, especially given that the director is currently shooting a pair of films, “Knight of Cups” and another untitled film starring Ryan Gosling, back to back.

Telluride Review: Endearing & Buoyant ‘Frances Ha’ Marks A Terrific Gear Shift For Director Noah Baumbach

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • September 1, 2012 8:47 PM
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  • 5 Comments
Loose, limber and driven by a fierce energy and staccato/pause rhythm we haven't seen previously from this filmmaker, Noah Baumbach's sublime "Frances Ha" is a fresh and vivacious near-reinvention of the director/writer's comedic milieu. An enchanting riff on friendship and the late-20-something right of passage into true adulthood, while the buoyant comedy does focus on those who still don't have their shit together, it is however, leagues more rich and emotionally layered than the average arrested development dilemma that seems to pervade 20/30-something comedies of late.

Telluride Review: Intimate & Devastating ‘Ginger & Rosa’ Features A Transformative Elle Fanning Performance

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • September 1, 2012 12:22 PM
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  • 8 Comments
Lovely and devastating, challenging yet worthwhile, Sally Potter's "Ginger & Rosa" may be the English filmmaker's best since "Orlando," and perhaps her most accessible to date. The intimate and sensual picture also features yet another terrific performance by 14-year-old Elle Fanning, who is quickly becoming the most compelling teenage actor working in movies today. But this time, as the lead, Fanning is transformative, heartbreakingly conveying the inner-life of an adolescent with an almost eerie and nuanced command of her craft.

Recap: The Women Come To The Fore As War Looms In Episode 2 Of 'Parade's End'

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • September 1, 2012 11:52 AM
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  • 3 Comments
“Parade’s End” has already proven divisive. It’s been widely praised by the punditry, but many viewers have expressed frustration with its wilfully muddled structure (apparently a hangover from the even more chronologically confusing books), in which events separated by years and sometimes countries crash together as though occupying contiguous spaces. It doesn’t help, say these critics, that these events then unfold with a minimum of helpful backstory, and little contextualisation, so we drop in mid-conversation or catch mere glimpses of relevant newspaper headlines or have to tell simply by the fact that this minor character is talking to this other minor character, that Something Is Up. It’s challenging for the viewer, and within the genre of the costume drama, which is frequently reduced to who-is-shagging-whom-oh-look-at-that-pretty-hat throughlines, that can be offputting.

Part 2 Of 'The Hobbit' Entitled 'The Desolation of Smaug,' Part 3 Dated For July 18th, 2014

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 1, 2012 10:14 AM
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  • 7 Comments
One problem with turning your two-part fantasy epic into a three-part fantasy epic is that you need to find a new title from somewhere. It's alright when a "Twilight" or a "Hunger Games" decide to split their final installment into two, because they can always go for a "Breaking Dawn Pt. 1 and 2" or "Mockingjay Pt. 1 and 2" type deal, but for "The Hobbit," Peter Jackson had already added two new subtitles to his one-book source material, admittedly ones already associated with the books -- "An Unexpected Journey" and "There And Back Again."

Venice Review: 'The Master' Is Paul Thomas Anderson's Most Complex And Distinctive Film To Date

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 1, 2012 7:37 AM
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  • 25 Comments
No movie has been more keenly anticipated by cinephiles in 2012 than Paul Thomas Anderson’s “The Master.” The filmmaker has been one of cinema’s most exciting new voices for a decade and a half now, but reached a new level of adulation with his last picture, ”There Will Be Blood,” which won awards and topped critical lists the world over five years ago. As such, the genesis and production of “The Master” was avidly followed, not least because the film was long ago said to revolve around a fictionalized surrogate of L. Ron Hubbard and his ever-controversial Scientology, and because Anderson had shot the film on 70mm film, the first major production to do so since Kenneth Branagh’s “Hamlet” in 1996.

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