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The Playlist

Daniel Craig Wants 'The Whole Truth,' Felicity Jones Falls For 'Rosaline,' Adrien Brody Hears 'Manhattan Nocture' & More

  • By Cain Rodriguez
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  • January 30, 2014 9:03 AM
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  • 0 Comments
With the future for “The Girl Who Played With Fire” still uncertain — “Seven” screenwriter Andrew Kevin Walker was reported to have taken a crack at the script last summer — and only “Bond 24” to look forward to, Daniel Craig doesn’t have a lot on his plate but Variety reports that’s about to change.

Watch: First Trailer For Wes Anderson's Quirky Ensemble Comedy 'The Grand Budapest Hotel'

  • By Edward Davis
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  • October 17, 2013 10:00 AM
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  • 44 Comments
Grand Budapest Hotel, Ralph Fiennes
Teased earlier this week with the poster, the trailer for Wes Anderson's eighth feature length effort, "The Grand Budapest Hotel" has finally arrived. The auteur has said several times in recent years that he has no plans to change up his famously idiosyncratic style. "My natural handwriting is neat and it is like my personality. Somewhere along the way I made this choice: I can force myself to not be what I feel I naturally am or I can just go with it and develop it," he said last year in Cannes. "[Repeating myself] is not something I think about. I really think about just the world of this movie, and what this one is going to be." And yes, this 'Grand Budapest Hotel' trailer is very Wes Anderson-y, showing off his second period piece following the '60s setting of "Moonrise Kingdom."

TIFF Review: Paul Haggis' 'Third Person' With Liam Neeson, James Franco & Olivia Wilde Is Ludicrously Awful

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • September 10, 2013 5:33 PM
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  • 19 Comments
We're coming on a decade since Paul Haggis' "Crash" won Best Picture at the Oscars, and it's still one of the most divisive victories in recent memory. Detractors of the film are quick to point out the flaws in the L.A.-set drama, citing what they perceive to be the film's crass manipulativeness, one-dimensional characters, clumsy hand with racial politics and eye-rolling core of sentimentality. But frankly, you haven't seen anything yet. Haggis' return to the ensemble drama in "Third Person" makes "Crash" look like a work of understated, subtle art. A disastrously and ludicrously awful effort from the writer/director, absolutely nothing works in this facile, cliche-filled and astoundingly dull film that trades in cheap drama and soap opera theatrics.

Adrien Brody Is Houdini For History Channel, Tye Sheridan Joins 'The Forger' With John Travolta & More

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
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  • August 23, 2013 12:09 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Call it the influence of Terrence Malick or just pure performance, but take any recent film dabbling in the natural world from a young boy's perspective and you can bet actor Tye Sheridan's name was hovering around the cast list. Since “The Tree of Life,” the 16-year-old has landed lead roles in “Mud,” opposite Matthew McConaughey, and David Gordon Green's upcoming “Joe” with Nicolas Cage. His next project finds him facing another major name, but thankfully with a different genre slant.

Rosemarie DeWitt Joins 'Poltergeist' Remake, Adrien Brody Is 'Banking On Mr. Toad' & More

  • By Jason McDonald
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  • July 23, 2013 4:07 PM
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  • 3 Comments
It’s a tale of new beginnings, goodbyes and do-overs in this casting roundup. If there’s one constant in Hollywood it’s that things are always changing and that’s still true of this latest casting news which features updates on horror movies, literary adaptations, musicals and more.

Watch: Steve McQueen's 'The Great St. Louis Bank Robbery' Which Is Being Remade By Adrien Brody & Hayden Christensen

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 24, 2013 3:08 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Well, if the goal was put together the most unlikely cast to ever remake a Steve McQueen film then mission accomplished. We'll grant you it's not one of his classic works, so the offence isn't quite as egregious, but still, surely a somewhat classic film deserves slightly better?

'To The Wonder': 10 Actors Cut Out Of Terrence Malick Films & How They Reacted

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • April 10, 2013 3:39 PM
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  • 28 Comments
To The Wonder, Actors Cut From Malick Films
We’ve all been there. Cast as the lead in a meaty, dialogue-heavy role in a surefire masterpiece from one of the most unassailable geniuses of modern filmmaking, only to be reduced to sifting through the finished film on freeze frame occasionally shouting "Look! That’s my shadow on that fern!" or "Hey! That’s the back of my head near that egret!" The one comfort we can take when this inevitability occurs, is that we’re in fine company on the Malick cutting room floor. The only question is, whose lead will we follow in reacting to our role’s excision or drastic reduction?

Nicolas Cage Hunts 'Tokarev,' Sam Rockwell Boxes As Billy Miske, Adrien Brody Heads To 'Cannes' & More

  • By Joe Cunningham
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  • February 14, 2013 1:46 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Here's a little casting roundup of some leading men who have come aboard new projects in the past few days...

Watch: Red Band Trailer For 'InAPPropriate Comedy' Directed By The Slap Chop Guy & Starring Adrien Brody & Lindsay Lohan

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 7, 2013 3:38 PM
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  • 5 Comments
Back in October we put together a feature entitled Fire Your Agent: 10 Actors Who Need A Change Of Career Direction. And among them was Adrien Brody, who seems to have no discerning standard for choosing projects, just as quick to do a Woody Allen movie as....well, this. Vince Offer, the guy who created the fucking Slap Chop, has made a movie. And basically, Brody, Michelle Rodriguez, Rob Schneider and Lindsay Lohan all need to fire their agents and rethink their careers for being involved in this thing.

Rome Review: '1942' Is A Long, Old-Fashioned But Absorbing Epic Of Chinese Historical Cinema

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • November 17, 2012 7:02 PM
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  • 5 Comments
If the appropriate length of a film were calculated in proportion to the scope of its subject, all 144 minutes of Feng Xiaogang's "1942" (also known as "Back to 1942"), which played In Competition at the Rome Film Festival, would be wholly justified. While the Henan Famine of the early 1940s is not a well-known tragedy outside China, the scale of the suffering, death and displacement it caused simply boggles the mind, the numbers are so colossal. And for the most part, Feng does an impressive job of memorializing the 3 million dead; "1942" is not an unqualified success, but it did retain our interest and engagement across its multiple story lines and over its expansive running time.

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