The Playlist

Watch: Trailer For Rachid Bouchareb's 'Two Men In Town' Starring Forest Whitaker, Harvey Keitel & Luis Guzman

  • By Cain Rodriguez
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  • April 8, 2014 10:36 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Two Men In Town
Forest Whitaker seems to be drifting back into the spotlight. Last year, he led the hit "Lee Daniels' The Butler" and appeared in support in "Out Of The Furnace," and now he has a bonafide arthouse world film with the Berlin International Film Festival-approved “Two Men In Town.” Helmed by “Outside The Law” director Rachid Bouchareb, the film’s French trailer has arrived online ahead of its release in that country and you won’t need to know French to watch it.

Review: Wes Anderson's Beautiful & Melancholy 'The Grand Budapest Hotel'

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • March 7, 2014 11:21 AM
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  • 1 Comment
The Grand Budapest Hotel
Love. There are points during “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” at which it simply floods off the screen. It sounds too lofty perhaps, but how else can you describe the level of minute care that seems to have gone into every single frame, every costume, every tear in every strip of wallpaper? If nothing else (and there is quite a lot else) the film is at times perhaps the apotheosis of Wes Anderson’s aesthetic: a glorious, mischievous sequence of pictorialist plays taking place in a world so perfectly contained it might as well be in a snowglobe. This trademark fetishistic detail makes it feel like it was somehow loved into being, and, for whole passages, we loved it right back, giddily grinning in the dark, already mentally marking out those moments when we’re going to have to hit pause to examine the background, the edge of the frame, the action that happens in the corner of your eye.

Berlin Reviews: ‘Two Men In Town,’ Blind Massage,’ ‘If You Don’t, I Will’ & ‘In Between Worlds’

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • February 18, 2014 5:34 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Two Men In Town
A remake of a 1973 French film starring Alain Delon and Jean Gabin, “Two Men In Town” is a sadly missed opportunity. It's a beautifully shot film (kudos to DP Yves Cape, who also served on “Holy Motors” and “White Material”), but one that, aside from some unusual casting decisions, brings nothing new to the ex-con-trying-to-go-straight genre. In fact it falls into its overfamiliar rhythm so quickly that you have to keep reminding yourself you haven’t seen it before.

Watch: New Clip From 'Grand Budapest Hotel' Plus Criterion's 3 Reasons To Pick Up 'Fantastic Mr. Fox'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • February 18, 2014 5:17 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Grand Budapest Hotel
What else can be said at this point about Wes Anderson's "The Grand Budapest Hotel"? Simply put, everything from the ensemble cast, to the carefully realized setting, to the screwball story has come together to create yet another delightful concoction from the filmmaker (our review). And with so many characters and moments to choose from, Fox Searchlight has bounty of material with which to cull sneak peeks from.

Jack Black Takes 'The D-Train,' Chloe Sevigny Feels '#Horror' And John Turturro & Vanessa Paradis Say 'Rio, I Love You'

  • By Ben Brock
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  • February 11, 2014 9:19 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Nachrichten aus Berlin! That's “news from Berlin” to you English. But although it's from Berlin, it's about Rio de Janeiro, which is confusing. But yes, news has arrived that John Turturro and Vanessa Paradis (who paired up in his upcoming directorial effort "Fading Gigolo") have signed on for a segment in the forthcoming “Rio, Eu Te Amo” — and if you don't speak Portuguese, you can work it out from the previous films in the series of city-focused anthologies, “Paris, je t'aime” and “New York, I Love You,” the first of which was a surprise success back in 2006.

Berlin Review: Wes Anderson's 'The Grand Budapest Hotel' Starring Ralph Fiennes, Bill Murray, Jude Law & More

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • February 6, 2014 3:00 PM
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  • 8 Comments
The Grand Budapest Hotel
Love. There are points during “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” which celebrates its World Premiere as the opening film of 64th Berlinale tonight, at which it simply floods off the screen. It sounds too lofty perhaps, but how else can you describe the level of minute care that seems to have gone into every single frame, every costume, every tear in every strip of wallpaper? If nothing else (and there is quite a lot else) the film is at times perhaps the apotheosis of Wes Anderson’s aesthetic: a glorious, mischievous sequence of pictorialist plays taking place in a world so perfectly contained it might as well be in a snowglobe.

12 Movie Stars Who Experienced Career Resurrections

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • October 31, 2013 4:27 PM
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  • 10 Comments
Movie Stars /Career Resurrections
This week “The Dallas Buyers Club” opens (you can read our review here), and it features a riveting, committed, physically gruelling and very likely-to-be-Oscar-nominated performance by Matthew McConaughey. If he is nominated, however, McConaughey will be at least a little in debt to the buzz that’s surrounded him of late as the newest member of what we could call the Comeback Club—that rarefied group of people who have, sometimes on a dime, turned their movie careers around and breathed new life into what was once moribund. It takes a great deal of luck to pull off this trickiest of acts, and for every actor who’s managed to hang onto their newly regained spot on top of the pile for a few years, there are ten who’ve briefly clambered all the way up only to topple off again a moment later.

Watch: First Trailer For Wes Anderson's Quirky Ensemble Comedy 'The Grand Budapest Hotel'

  • By Edward Davis
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  • October 17, 2013 10:00 AM
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  • 44 Comments
Grand Budapest Hotel, Ralph Fiennes
Teased earlier this week with the poster, the trailer for Wes Anderson's eighth feature length effort, "The Grand Budapest Hotel" has finally arrived. The auteur has said several times in recent years that he has no plans to change up his famously idiosyncratic style. "My natural handwriting is neat and it is like my personality. Somewhere along the way I made this choice: I can force myself to not be what I feel I naturally am or I can just go with it and develop it," he said last year in Cannes. "[Repeating myself] is not something I think about. I really think about just the world of this movie, and what this one is going to be." And yes, this 'Grand Budapest Hotel' trailer is very Wes Anderson-y, showing off his second period piece following the '60s setting of "Moonrise Kingdom."

Listen To Robin Wright Sing & Watch Two Featurettes From Ari Folman's 'The Congress'

  • By Jason Guimaron
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  • July 31, 2013 9:38 AM
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  • 0 Comments
After receiving rave reviews for his animated feature “Waltz with Bachir” in 2008, Israeli director Ari Folman divided critics with his new movie “The Congress” at the Directors' Fortnight in Cannes this year. Our reviewer on the field described the piece as ambitious, unique and bold but "overloaded with too many ideas". The film is "regularly diverting from any sort of central narrative to follow tenuous and ill-explained threads that end up in a foggy limbo" and "it poses the old question of whether the immense ambition of the project should be admired over the fact that it falls down on so many of those ambitions."

Cannes Review: Ari Folman's Part-Animated 'The Congress' Is Overstuffed And Overwritten, But Sort Of Fascinating

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • May 16, 2013 7:21 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Ari Folman's "The Congress" aka "Robin Wright at The Congress" aka "Reviewer's Nightmare" (last title mine) opens the director's fortnight at Cannes this evening and screened for a group of alternately beguiled and baffled press this morning. Evoking Miyazaki and perhaps on-form Gilliam in its best moments, and lurching oddly into "Southland Tales" territory in its worst, it is a film we'd be happy to call a fascinating muddle, were it not a little overstretched to really support even that summation. At the very least, however, should your copy of "Pink Floyd's The Wall" have worn out through overuse, we can see "The Congress" having a similar kind of life as a late-night stoner mindfuck.

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