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Review: 'Miele' Is A Fascinating And Artful Look At Life's Sweet Details

  • By Nikola Grozdanovic
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  • March 15, 2014 9:43 AM
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“You have a really shitty job,” a woman tells Irene (Jasmine Trinca) as she sees her out of her apartment. Irene, who works under the alias “Honey” to try and sweeten the reality, at least on the surface, can't say much in response because she knows it's true. However you personally dice the sensitive issue of euthanasia, you can't deny that assisting someone who has given up on life is a shitty job. Terminal illness is one of the scariest things in this world, and people like Irene understand that more than anyone because they have the kind of courage needed to actually do something about it. Whether she's a heathen or a healer, director Valeria Golino smartly avoids the precarious question altogether. Instead she creates a subdued character study of a young woman's awakening to the brighter side of life.

Review: Valeria Golino Takes A Nuanced Look At Death In Directorial Debut 'Miele'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 4, 2014 7:08 PM
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Miele
If Michael Haneke's "Amour" presented death as a sobering inevitability, one that will test the bounds of our ability to love, actress Valeria Golino has a slightly more nuanced perspective in her directorial debut "Miele." While the subject of euthanasia is the entryway into the story, Golino wisely strays from turning her film into an Issues Movie, and instead opts to explore death both as a vessel for closure and a window into appreciating the life we have.

Cannes Review: Death Lingers & Lifts In Thoughtful 'Miele'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 17, 2013 5:39 PM
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If Michael Haneke's "Amour" presented death as a sobering inevitability, one that will test the bounds of our ability to love, actress Valeria Golino has a slightly more nuanced perspective in her directorial debut "Miele." While the subject of euthanasia is the entryway into the story, Golino wisely strays from turning her film into an Issues Movie, and instead opts to explore the death both as a vessel for closure, and a window into appreciating the life we have.

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