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5 Actresses That Are Overdue For An Oscar Nomination

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • February 21, 2012 4:41 PM
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  • 19 Comments
Well, we've taken a look at the leading men, now it's time to look at the actresses who have also fallen outside of the Academy Award radar. While there is no Gary Oldman-esque story of recognition this year at the Oscars for the ladies, these five names will hopefully be a reminder that there are more women out there other than Meryl Streep who deserve to put that funny gold statue on their mantle.

5 Actors That Are Overdue For An Oscar Nomination

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • February 21, 2012 4:31 PM
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  • 30 Comments
Among the five Best Actor nominees at this Sunday's Academy Awards, there's one person who should have been sitting in the Kodak Theater long ago: at long last, Gary Oldman, one of the actors whose lack of awards recognition has long been lamented by the chattering film classes, gets to book a tuxedo and a limo, and call himself an Oscar nominee, thanks to his superb, understated performance as George Smiley in "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy."

(PDATED!) Watch Sean Durkin's 'Mary Last Seen' Short

  • By The Playlist
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  • February 20, 2012 6:30 PM
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  • 4 Comments
Updated 7:00PM EST: You can now view the film! Grab your redemption code and go here to watch it.

The 5 Worst Best Picture Oscar Line-Ups Of All Time

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • February 20, 2012 2:57 PM
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  • 48 Comments
Alright, you've already seen our picks for the five best BEST Picture years, the Oscar years that you can actually look back on and not wince if you're a fan of movies and just-deserved prizes. So let's keep it simple: here are the five worst years below, the ones that make fans of cinema rather crazy and that have had people bitching about it ever since.

The 5 Best Best Picture Oscar Line-Ups Of All Time

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • February 20, 2012 2:39 PM
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  • 43 Comments
Given that 2011 was one of the better years for English-language cinema in recent memory, it's disappointing that this year's Best Picture line up feels more anaemic. Sure, you'll find few who'll quibble with the inclusion of " Moneyball" -- it's the kind of fearsomely smart, grown-up entertainment than in an ideal world, would make up the majority of nominees. And even those who weren't totally won over by "The Tree of Life" surely can't find much to complain about when it comes to its inclusion.

James Franco Says 'My Own Private River' Probably Won't Be Released On DVD, But He Did Seek Joaquin Phoenix's Approval

  • By Simon Abrams
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  • February 20, 2012 1:00 PM
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  • 6 Comments
Last night, actor-cum-director James Franco nervously introduced "My Own Private River" to a full house at the Film Society at Lincoln Center's Walter Reade Theater. The 9pm screening of Franco's film, a companion piece composed of never-before-seen outtakes from Gus Van Sant's milestone drama "My Own Private Idaho" starring River Phoenix and Keanu Reeves as young, gay street hustlers, was part of the Film Society's annual "Film Comment Selects" program. "Film Comment Selects" highlights films curated by the writers of Film Comment Magazine, a periodical produced by Lincoln Center and edited by Gavin Smith.

Cannes 2012: Will 'The Master,' Terrence Malick's New Film, James Gray's Latest & More Actually Premiere?

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • February 20, 2012 12:02 PM
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  • 21 Comments
By this time last year, we already knew that Woody Allen’s “Midnight In Paris” would be opening the Cannes Film Festival, but as March looms closer, there still has been no word yet from organizers which film will kick off the festivities. Yet, that hasn’t stopped conjecture and suppostion as Cineuropa recently penned a speculatory long list of films they they guessing could be heading to Cannes (which includes iffy bets like Terrence Malick's next movie, Paul Thomas Anderson's "The Master" and more). These lists are fun and all, they get the cinephiles' anticipation juices going (see one example here), but the reality of the matter is there is a element of wish fulfillment to all of them and less than half the films generally posted in these pieces actually end up appearing at the Croisette. Still, using that piece as a jumping off point, we decided to dig a bit deeper to sort out which movies are near certain locks, which are possibilities and those that aren’t going to make it all.

'Submarine' Star Craig Roberts Talks Berlin Pic 'Comes A Bright Day' & New Projects With Derick Martini & Cillian Murphy

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • February 20, 2012 9:56 AM
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  • 2 Comments
One of the more impressive screen debuts of last year came from 21-year-old Welsh actor Craig Roberts. A British children's TV veteran (he was the star of "The Story Of Tracy Beaker" and "Young Dracula" among others), Roberts broke out as the pretentious, deluded hero of Richard Ayoade's charming "Submarine," coming across as equal parts Dustin Hoffman, Bud Cort and John Gordon Sinclair (from "Gregory's Girl"), and it seemed to mark the birth of a star.

The Amazing Race: Does Box Office Still Matter To The Oscars, And Do The Oscars Still Matter To Box Office?

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • February 17, 2012 3:31 PM
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  • 5 Comments
Let's be honest, the are about money. Not entirely about money: there's also the potential for executives and directors to win bragging rights over the colleagues. And there's a degree of back-patting celebration of the industry in there as well. But if the studios didn't think they could wring a few extra dimes from their product by giving them awards, there's no way that the Oscars would have the massive place in film culture that they maintain.

Brillante Mendoza Discusses Working With Isabelle Huppert On 'Captive' & His Smaller-Scale, Manila-Set Next Project

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • February 17, 2012 1:34 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Brillante Mendoza has a killer work ethic: the Filipino director made nine films between 2005's "Masahista" and 2009's "Lola," the latter of which, along with Cannes in-competition entry "Kinatay" the same year, really launched him into the major leagues of international helmers. He's taken an uncharacteristic two-and-a-half year break, but returned this week at the Berlin Film Festival with "Captive," a gripping, Herzogian drama that should see him reach his widest audience yet, thanks to the presence of international star Isabelle Huppert.

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