Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

The Playlist

15 Directors Unceremoniously Fired Or Replaced On A Movie

  • By The Playlist Staff
  • |
  • March 22, 2013 10:59 AM
  • |
  • 23 Comments
Getting fired, quitting a job hastily, "mutually agreeing" to exit...no matter how it's phrased, being removed from any project is never fun as almost anyone who has ever worked a day in their life can attest. The recent debacle with “Jane Got A Gun” -- director Lynne Ramsay was a no show for work on the first day of filming apparently having clashed with the producers -- is an unfortunate peg with which to take a look back at filmmakers who were fired, replaced or walked off a film, but history is full of interesting tales of films gone awry thanks to the regrettable loss of a film’s director.

'Admission' Granted: 20 Great College-Set Movies

  • By The Playlist Staff
  • |
  • March 21, 2013 3:59 PM
  • |
  • 8 Comments
Ah, the college experience. Success through opportunity! Or uh, something like that. For many, it's the first real taste of unchaperoned freedom, mixed in with girls, guys, sex, parties, experimentation and if you’re lucky, a bit of higher learning, too. Like the high school film, the college movie is a tried and true genre, and ironically, generally less mature than high school pictures which are mostly centering on coming-of-age, outsider blues and the like. These themes can be similar in college movies, but with much less adult supervision, the genre tends to get wilder, crazier, more vulgar and more unhinged. Though that’s obviously relative depending on the era.

10 Robert Altman Films You May Not Know

  • By The Playlist Staff
  • |
  • March 21, 2013 1:05 PM
  • |
  • 30 Comments
It's easy to forget that Robert Altman didn't have his breakthrough until he was well into his 40s, with 1970's "M*A*S*H." The filmmaker proved to be so prolific -- and continued to be piled with acclaim and critical plaudits well into his '80s -- that it feels like his career in feature cinema lasted for much longer than the 35 years he's known for (Altman made a few features prior to "M*A*S*H," but mostly worked in TV during the 1950s and 1960s).

'Badlands' Arrives On Criterion: 10 Things We Learned About The Terrence Malick Classic

  • By Rodrigo Perez
  • |
  • March 20, 2013 4:22 PM
  • |
  • 8 Comments
When you think of lovers and killers on the lam, you think of roadtrip movies like “True Romance,” “Natural Born Killers,” “Bonnie & Clyde” or "The Getaway." But when philosopher, journalist and renaissance man turned filmmaker Terrence Malick tackled the genre for his debut picture, he created a film more interested in innocence (and its loss) and love than the crimes and acts of violence occurring within the story based on Charles Starkweather’s late ‘50s killing spree. A lyrical and impressionistic take on a troubled young killer and the girl that falls for him -- perhaps all the more chilling for its beautiful imagery and sublime/naive view of life that some of us still argue is his finest work to date -- “Badlands” would launch the career of one of cinema’s most enigmatic and inscrutable filmmakers who would soon stop talking to the press or allowing his photo to be taken.

On The Rise: 10 Screenwriters To Watch In 2013

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • March 20, 2013 2:45 PM
  • |
  • 49 Comments
Screenwriters historically get a rough ride in Hollywood. If a film works, they're normally skipped over when it's time to hand out the credit; if it doesn't they're the first to be blamed. They're rewritten, fired, replaced, rehired, fired again, underpaid, made to do free drafts, generally abused, and disrespected. And then the star takes the credit for the best lines anyway. And yet, no movie that you love would exist without a screenwriter to come up with the damn thing in the first place; they're the most consistently and perplexingly undervalued part of the process.

The Films Of Powell & Pressburger: A Retrospective

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • March 19, 2013 4:49 PM
  • |
  • 12 Comments
For much of their lifetimes, Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger never got the due they deserved. Powell was as English as you could get, who'd worked his way up through the film industry, before coming to the attention of British film magnate Alexander Korda. Pressburger, meanwhile, was Hungarian Jewish by birth, who'd come to Germany in the 1920s to work as a screenwriter, moving to Paris, and then England when the Nazis came to power, and again was working for Korda. When the two met in 1939, there was an instant kinship. They shared a similarly uncompormising and original take on filmmaking, and were soon working hand in hand, sharing credit as writers, directors and producers under the banner of their The Archers production company.

The Essentials: Luis Bunuel

  • By The Playlist Staff
  • |
  • March 19, 2013 3:51 PM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Anti-establishment to the core and arguably one of the original enfante terrible filmmakers, Luis Bunuel had three preoccupations, no, obsessions that he charted for his entire career: religion, class and sexual desire. Labeled a surrealist early on his career due to "Un Chien Andalou," his famous collaboration with Salvador Dali (responsible for one of cinema's most famous images, of a razor blade slicing an eyeball, and made when the filmmaker was just 29) it would be extremely pat to reduce Bunuel's long and eclectic career to that idiosyncratic work. A blasphemous heretic to the church, several of Bunuel's films were flagrant censures of religion and the Catholic church, which saw him fleeing Spain more than once during his career.

On The Rise: 10 Actresses To Watch In 2013

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • March 18, 2013 1:48 PM
  • |
  • 6 Comments
Last week, we picked out ten actors who are On The Rise, a group of guys who all impressed us in recent roles, and likely have put themselves on the radar of Hollywood, with names like Corey Stoll, Alex Karpovsky, Jack Reynor and Omar Sy coming to our attention.

We Read It: Casting David Fincher's Potential Next Movie 'Gone Girl'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • March 15, 2013 2:44 PM
  • |
  • 39 Comments
It's been in the works for a while now, but according to Deadline last night, geek favorite David Fincher is inching closer to signing on to an adaptation of Gillian Flynn's novel "Gone Girl." The novel, by the former EW staffer who already had some success with thrillers "Sharp Objects" and "Dark Places" (that are also both being developed for movies), was snapped up by Reese Witherspoon not long after publication, and rave reviews and word-of-mouth have seen it become a literary phenomenon over the last year or so. Even if you haven't read it yourself, you probably know plenty of people who have, or at least have seen a subway car full of people carrying it.

Michael Caine: The 10 Best Performances

  • By The Playlist Staff
  • |
  • March 14, 2013 3:54 PM
  • |
  • 23 Comments
When asked what he thought about "Jaws: The Revenge," Michael Caine (born Maurice Micklewhite in London on March 14, 1933) famously said, “I have never seen it, but by all accounts it is terrible. However, I have seen the house that it built, and it is terrific.” That would seem to give the impression that Michael Caine's career choices have often been driven by paychecks, but that would be a false one. While he's done his fair share of bill-paying, the prolific British actor has, across a fifty-year career, remained one of the best-loved and most enduring stars we have, as well as a wonderful -- and all too often underrated -- actor.

Email Updates

Recent Comments