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5 Great Election Movies To Get You Through Voting Day

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • November 6, 2012 11:01 AM
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  • 4 Comments
As you've probably noticed unless you just this minute slipped out of a coma (and if that's the case, stop reading this and go call your loved ones), it's election day. Four years on from the election of the first African-American commander-in-chief, President Barack Obama is squaring off at the ballot box against the Republican challenger, Mitt Romney in what looks likely to be the tightest election since... well, 2004, probably.

No, Mr. Bond, I Expect You To Die: The 5 Best Bond Villains

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • November 5, 2012 1:02 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Even before it's released in the U.S. this Friday, "Skyfall," the 23rd official entry in the James Bond series, is already a monster hit, taking nearly quarter of a billion dollars worldwide in its first ten days in theaters. And with good reason -- Sam Mendes' take on Ian Fleming's super-spy is terrific, and certainly ranks among the upper reaches of the franchise.

Sean Howe's 'Marvel Comics: The Untold Story' & The 5 Most Tantalizing Marvel Movie What-Ifs

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • November 5, 2012 11:00 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Sean Howe's brilliant new book, "Marvel Comics: The Untold Story," is a fascinating history of the House of Ideas, from its humble beginnings to its place as a multimedia pop culture juggernaut (and everything in between). What makes Howe's book so fascinating (and such a compulsively un-put-down-able read) is how human it is. He's interested in characters, but not the kind that fly or shoot lasers out of their eyes. And as the book rolls along, it becomes clear that Howe is less interested in the Marvel that is currently nestled within the Disney conglomerate and pumping out billion dollar spectacles like this summer's "The Avengers," than in the hardscrabble, fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants operation that made it so impactful in the first place. Along the way, too, it tells the story of Stan Lee, who moved away from the characters he created and the format he originally conceived and more obsessed with Hollywood and translating those heroes to the big screen. What follows is the most fascinating, bizarre, and out-there possibilities of the one-time cinematic Marvel Universe.

Game Over! 5 Videogame-Inspired Movies You Should Watch

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • November 1, 2012 12:04 PM
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  • 2 Comments
This Friday "Wreck-It Ralph," Disney's 52nd feature-length animated film, is released nationwide. A loving, zippy homage to classic arcade games and the world of gaming, it feels more like a tried-and-true video game adaptation than actual video game adaptations (like the odious "Silent Hill: Retribution," which is also currently in theaters). In honor of "Wreck-It Ralph," we've compiled a list of five movies that play like video games even though they have nothing to do with real-life video games. Hope you have some extra quarters handy.

Drink Up: 5 Movies About Alcoholism

  • By Simon Abrams
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  • November 1, 2012 11:00 AM
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  • 8 Comments
“Flight” is as strong as it is because it never pulls punches when it comes to portraying the dark side of protagonist Whip Whitaker’s (Denzel Washington) alcoholism. Whip’s character arc is as moving as it is because he’s surrounded by people that don’t know how to help him and people that want to hide him away so he can’t further embarrass them. Addiction is presented as an individual’s choice, albeit one that is incredibly hard to stop making, and “Flight” is just the latest in a line of humane and unsentimental dramas about alcoholics. From the horrors of finding one more drink in “The Lost Weekend” to the bitterly funny skid row life depicted in both “Barfly” and “Factotum,” this list is dedicated to films that neither baby their audience nor judge their protagonists too harshly. So before you see “Flight,” check out these five superior alcoholism dramas.

7 Things You Should Know About Roman Polanski's 'Rosemary's Baby'

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • October 31, 2012 3:43 PM
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  • 8 Comments
Roman Polanski’s “Rosemary’s Baby” was a box-office hit upon its release in the summer of 1968. It grossed $33 million dollars off a $3 million dollar budget (adjusted for inflation that’s $221million from a $19 million budget) and it paved the way for horror blockbusters like “The Exorcist” and “The Omen” in the years to come. Made by Polanski at the age of 34, it was the Polish director’s American film debut, and the picture became nominated for two Academy Awards, including a win for Ruth Gordon's deliciously quirky Supporting Role performance as the neighbor from hell. It also earned Polanski his first Oscar nomination for his adaptation of Ira Levin’s novel, which is not bad for a guy that didn’t speak English as a first language.

Trick Or Treat: Halloween DVDs & Blu-Rays Worth Scaring Up Including 'Arachnophobia,' 'A Nightmare on Elm Street' & More

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • October 31, 2012 2:56 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Attention boys and girls, it’s almost that time again. The time of year when ghosts and goblins roam the streets on All Hallow’s Eve, and the rest of us adults stay inside and watch horror films (or so we say). Well fortunately, plenty of the major studios and boutique home entertainment labels have been popping out releases of some of our favorite genre fare. So without further ado, stare directly into your television screens and tune into any one of these superb flicks just in time for Halloween, all available on home video.
More: Features

5 Things You May Not Know About Alfred Hitchcock's 'Spellbound'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 31, 2012 1:57 PM
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  • 2 Comments
We're of the general opinion that you can never get enough Hitchcock, and while we've just wrapped up our massive retrospective of the director's works, to celebrate the release of a new Blu-ray boxset of his work, today has another Hitch connection. These days, Halloween means "Paranormal Activity" sequels in theaters (and before that, "Saw" movies), but in the past, when the holiday wasn't such a corporate behemoth, more interesting fare made it to theaters for that time of year. And October 31st, 1945 saw the release of Hitchcock's "Spellbound."

Retrospective: The Films Of Alfred Hitchcock Pt. 2 (1940-1976, The Hollywood Years)

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 31, 2012 12:59 PM
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  • 6 Comments
In the late 1930s, with films like "The Man Who Knew Too Much," "The 39 Steps" and "The Lady Vanishes" having proven global hits, the New York Times wrote: "Three unique and valuable institutions the British have that we in America have not. Magna Carta, the Tower Bridge and Alfred Hitchcock, the greatest director of screen melodramas in the world." And unsurprisingly, he came to the attention of Hollywood, with David O. Selznick signing the filmmaker to an exclusive contract, and bringing him over to direct "Rebecca."

Bringing Balance To The Force? 5 Directions The New 'Star Wars' Films Could Go

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 31, 2012 10:59 AM
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  • 31 Comments
Unless you've been robbed of power by Hurricane Sandy, you've probably heard that yesterday saw the biggest movie news story of the year -- if not several years -- break. Disney have purchased LucasFilm for $4 billion, and have announced that plans are moving ahead for new "Star Wars" movies, beginning with "Episode VII" in 2015 (the start of a new trilogy), with franchise creator George Lucas serving only as a creative consultant, and new talent coming in to write and direct the new films.

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