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The Playlist

Spinning 'Cloud Atlas': 5 Unfilmable Novels That Became Movies & 5 More On The Way

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 26, 2012 12:31 PM
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  • 12 Comments
While it was a worldwide success, and displays some bold and ambitious storytelling that could look amazing on screen, it always seemed that there was little chance of David Mitchell's best-seller "Cloud Atlas" ever making it to screens. Indeed, Mitchell himself told the New Yorker recently, "As I was writing 'Cloud Atlas,' I thought, 'It's a shame this is unfilmable.' "

Everything Is Connected: 5 Movies That Paved The Way For 'Cloud Atlas'

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • October 25, 2012 2:02 PM
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  • 13 Comments
The big release of this week (albeit on rather fewer screens than you might expect) is also one of the most ambitious of the year -- The Wachowskis and Tom Tykwer's "Cloud Atlas." An adaptation of a novel by David Mitchell that some had deemed unfilmable, it's a near-three-hour tale that interlinks multiple narratives from the 1800s to the end of time, with its starry cast taking on multiple roles, often buried behind make-up that lets them change gender and even race.

Fire Your Agent: 10 Actors Who Need A Change Of Career Direction

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 24, 2012 2:23 PM
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  • 83 Comments
Last week brought the borderline-absurd news that Nicolas Cage was in talks to star in a new take on the god-bothering "Left Behind" franchise (this is a WTF even for Cage). This week brings the first major movie starring another Oscar-winner, Halle Berry, in five years, in the shape of "Cloud Atlas," as well as the barely-noticeable release of Gerard Butler vehicle "Chasing Mavericks." These things mean many things, but perhaps first and foremost among them, it's that certain actors aren't having the best of times.

Oscars: Why 'Skyfall' Isn't Going To Be A Best Picture Nominee

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 24, 2012 12:05 PM
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  • 6 Comments
This week sees the 23rd James Bond film, "Skyfall," hit theaters in the U.K. and elsewhere in Europe, ahead of the film's U.S. release on November 9th. About ten days ago, it screened to critics, this writer included, to probably the most wildly positive reaction ever seen to a film in the franchise. It's been hard to find a naysayer, with a three star review from Little White Lies deemed the only "rotten" review so far (and as usual, bringing out the mouth-breathers who can't deal with the slightest criticism of a movie they haven't seen).

Will 'The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey' Take Us Back To Middle-Earth In Triumph Or Ring Of Disappointment?

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • October 23, 2012 2:57 PM
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  • 8 Comments
With the days getting shorter and the clocks set to go back shortly, we've spent the last few weeks taking a look at the ten big fall releases that were, at least at the time, still unknown quantities. Three of them have since been screened: "Lincoln," "Flight" and "Skyfall," The rest -- "Wreck-It Ralph," "Django Unchained," "Les Miserables," "This Is 40," "Jack Reacher" and "Zero Dark Thirty" still remain under wraps for now.

5 Things You Might Not Know About 'Reservoir Dogs'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 23, 2012 1:47 PM
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  • 6 Comments
Prepare to feel very, very old indeed -- twenty years ago today, on October 23rd 1992, "Reservoir Dogs" was released in theaters, introducing the world to a 29-year-old video store clerk turned filmmaker with an encyclopaedic knowledge of film named Quentin Tarantino. But even in the months beforehand, his feature directorial debut, "Reservoir Dogs" had already started to upend the American independent film movement but with tremendously well received screenings at Sundance, Cannes and Toronto.

Who On Earth Could Warner Bros. Cast In Their 'Justice League' Movie?

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 23, 2012 12:21 PM
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  • 63 Comments
The great success story of 2012, in the blockbuster world, has been "The Avengers," the superhero team-up movie that was the culmination of Marvel's multi-year plan since they started producing their own movies. As you might expect, the film's success means that Marvel's arch-rivals Warner Bros./DC Comics are pressing ahead with a movie of "Justice League," their own superhero team-up property. DC are owned outright by Time Warner, and as such, they have the advantage of having all of the characters -- Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman et al. -- under the same roof. But outside of the success of Christopher Nolan's standalone Batman movies (they won't be crossing over into any future efforts), Warner Bros. hasn't had much success with their own comic book movies.

Oscars: Can 'The Sessions' Star John Hawkes Beat Out Better Known Competition To Win Best Actor?

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 22, 2012 1:59 PM
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  • 15 Comments
Only a few years ago, John Hawkes was one of Hollywood's best kept secrets. He'd been acting for decades, and cropped up in dozens of big film and TV projects, but at best was simply one of those "Hey, it's that guy!" character actors. But the mid '00s saw him eke towards center stage with a lead role in Miranda July's "Me and You and Everyone We Know," and as a regular on "Deadwood," and 2010 saw him finally make an indelible mark, as the terrier-like Teardrop in "Winter's Bone," which saw him pick up a surprise Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor.

Biting The Hand That Feeds? 10 Actors Who Dissed The Oscars Before Joaquin Phoenix

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 19, 2012 3:28 PM
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  • 4 Comments
Yesterday, "The Master" star Joaquin Phoenix raised some eyebrows when a choice quote from his conversation with Elvis Mitchell in Interview Magazine, in which he slammed the awards process, made the rounds: "I'm just saying that I think it's bullshit. I think it's total, utter bullshit, and I don't want to be a part of it. I don't believe in it. It's a carrot, but it's the worst-tasting carrot I've ever tasted in my whole life. I don't want this carrot. It's totally subjective. Pitting people against each other...It's the stupidest thing in the whole world... It was one of the most uncomfortable periods of my life when 'Walk the Line' was going through all the awards stuff and all that. I never want to have that experience again. I don't know how to explain it—and it's not like I'm in this place where I think I'm just above it—but I just don't ever want to get comfortable with that part of things."

Will Kathryn Bigelow's Osama Bin Laden Movie 'Zero Dark Thirty' Find Its Target Or Miss The Mark?

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 19, 2012 12:00 PM
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  • 17 Comments
This winter has something for most tastes -- animation ("Wreck-It Ralph"), historical drama ("Lincoln"), adult drama ("Flight"), musical ("Les Miserables"), comedy ("This Is 40"), action ("Skyfall" and "Jack Reacher") and western ("Django Unchained"), But almost nothing promises, in theory at least, to match up thrills and substance, as much as "Zero Dark Thirty." The long-gestating follow-up to Kathryn Bigelow and Mark Boal's Oscar-winning "The Hurt Locker," which revolves around the search for Osama Bin Laden, got a surprise new ending as it geared up for production when Bin Laden was killed in Pakistan last year.

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