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The Playlist

Videodrome: The Best Recent Music Videos Including Frank Ocean, Grizzly Bear, Bloc Party & Taylor Swift

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 5, 2012 4:02 PM
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  • 2 Comments
After a bit of a break for the summer months, it's time for the return of Videodrome, our semi-regular showcase for the best music videos around. Since the form has given the world game-changing helmers in both the blockbuster and arthouse realms, it's always important to keep an eye on promos, and indeed, one could argue that there's more invention to be found in the short form than there is in features. So, without further ado, the five best music videos we've seen in the last few weeks. As ever, any tips and suggestions are more than welcome.

Before Bond: The Long Road To Bring 007 To The Big Screen

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 5, 2012 12:00 PM
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  • 1 Comment
50 years ago today on October 5th, 1963, "Dr. No," a fairly low-budget, modest spy thriller starring a Scottish actor known for the Disney film "Darby O'Gill and the Little People," was released in the U.K. The film was an immediate success, taking £840,000 in its first two weeks, and ending up the fifth most successful film of the year in Britain. It continued to be a hit across the world, not least in the U.S., where it received the approval of John F. Kennedy and had seen the source novels by Ian Fleming become bestsellers. Ultimately, the film made nearly $60 million worldwide.

Licence To Sing: The Lost James Bond Themes By Johnny Cash, Blondie, Pulp & More

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 4, 2012 2:20 PM
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  • 11 Comments
Among the many things that make the James Bond franchise unique -- the sheer longevity, the way it's only become more prestigious and successful as it goes on, its ability to survive actor changeovers -- is the music. Not just the unforgettable theme by Monty Norman and the great scores by John Barry, but the way that every film since the second installment, "From Russia With Love," has featured a theme song over the abstracted, dancing-naked-lady-filled opening credits.

Exclusive: Zal Batmanglij Reveals The 4 Films That Influenced 'Sound Of My Voice'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • October 4, 2012 12:04 PM
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  • 3 Comments
It might seem like a distant memory, but it was at the Sundance Film Festival in 2011 where Brit Marling emerged as the next actress on the rise, and swept up along with her were filmmakers Mike Cahill and Zal Batmanglij, as she was the star and co-writer of both their films. And while the former's "Another Earth" was quickly ushered into theaters, Batmanglij had to wait a bit longer, but this spring "Sound Of My Voice" finally hit the big screen.

10 Highlights Of The BFI London Film Festival Line-Up

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 4, 2012 11:00 AM
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  • 1 Comment
The early months of fall are pretty much stacked with film festivals. From the end of August, when Venice and Telluride kick off the season, to the prestigious and star-studded selections at Toronto and New York in September and October, to the increasingly important AFI and Rome film festivals, globe-trotting cinephiles could happily go back to back from the late summer pretty much up to Christmas hopping from one festival to another.

Podcast: The Playlist Talks Highlights From TIFF, Telluride And NYFF; Plus Armond White: Genuine Contrarian Or Provocateur?

  • By Erik McClanahan
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  • October 3, 2012 6:14 PM
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  • 12 Comments
We've decided to double down this week on podcasts to make up for lost chats. Our slate for this week’s show is as follows: a round-up of festival reports from Toronto, Telluride and the beginning of New York Film Festival. Later in the episode, we discuss contrarian film critic Armond White regarding two pieces he recently wrote: one, called "The Battle of The Andersons," in which he claims Paul W.S Anderson is a better filmmaker than Paul Thomas Anderson. And the other, "The Whip and the Fedora," in which he posits "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skulls" is better than "Raiders of the Lost Ark."

Sound The Death Knell (Again): A Brief History Of The Death Of Cinema

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 2, 2012 12:00 PM
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  • 23 Comments
In case you hadn't heard, movies are a dead, or at least dying, artform. In the last few weeks, three high-profile critics -- David Denby and David Thomson in the New Republic, and Andrew O'Hehir at Salon -- have all taken the pulse of cinema, and called a time of death. All acknowledge that good films are still being made. But all agree, for the most part, that mainstream cinema has never been in worse health, blaming everything from special effects-packed blockbusters, to television, to things just being better in the old days, for its problems. Some are more hopeful than others, but all are deeply pessimistic about the form.
More: Features

The 10 Best Films To See In October

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 1, 2012 3:00 PM
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  • 4 Comments
After an unusually rewarding September, that featured critical and audience favorites like "The Master," "Looper," "End Of Watch," "Dredd," "The Perks Of Being a Wallflower" and "Arbitrage," October has arrived, but things aren't letting up. Sure, the box office is likely to be dominated by Liam Neeson cracking heads in "Taken 2," but there's plenty more to see when you look a little further afield. Below, you'll find ten of the best options over the coming month. Let us know what you're looking forward to most in the comments section.

Podcast: The Playlist Talks 'The Master' & 'Looper'

  • By Erik McClanahan
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  • October 1, 2012 10:59 AM
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  • 8 Comments
The podcast returns this week after a long absence. We apologize for the lack of shows, but obviously we've been hella busy. This week, host Erik McClanahan is joined by regular guests Kevin Jagernauth and Rodrigo Perez for reviews of two films from American writer/directors garnering a ton of attention at the moment: "The Master" from Paul Thomas Anderson, and the latest from Rian Johnson, "Looper." 

The 16 Best Movies About Time Travel

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • September 28, 2012 1:58 PM
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  • 20 Comments
Who hasn't wanted to go back and fix past mistakes? Or travel forward and see what's in store for you and for the world? It's for these reasons that time travel has remained such a popular plot device, from H.G. Wells' "The Time Machine" to the long-running TV show "Doctor Who" to this week's "Looper," the wildly acclaimed sci-fi action-thriller from "Brick" director Rian Johnson, starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Bruce Willis and Emily Blunt.

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