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The Playlist

5 Things You Might Not Know About David Fincher’s Criterion Approved 'The Game'

  • By Benjamin Wright
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  • September 20, 2012 2:02 PM
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  • 11 Comments
It seems unfair that David Fincher’s 1997 directorial outing “The Game” is often in the back of cinephile’s minds when they think of the director’s magnificent oeuvre. It is understandable in some ways, seeming as it’s sandwiched between two monumental directorial efforts into the pantheon of cult movies with Fincher’s own “Se7en” coming in 1995 and “Fight Club” hitting in 1999, but many fans of the notoriously finicky filmmakers would probably rank it close to or at the very top of their lists of the director’s best work. While it certainly isn’t as abrasive a film as “Se7en” or “Fight Club,” it’s just as memorable for showcasing the benefits of David Fincher’s acute attention to detail that would greatly benefit the many twists and turns of the film’s script.

5 Things You Might Not Know About 'L.A. Confidential'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 19, 2012 12:07 PM
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  • 8 Comments
It's safe to say that "L.A. Confidential" wasn't greeted with especially high expectations in the run up to its release. James Ellroy's 1990 book, the third of his "L.A. Quartet" (preceded by "The Black Dahlia" and "The Big Nowhere," and completed by "White Jazz") was a favorite among crime fans, but hardly a best seller. Screenwriter Brian Helgeland was known only for "Nightmare On Elm Street 4: The Dream Master" and a rewrite of actioner "Assassins." Director Curtis Hanson was well-liked, but mostly known for mid-level programmers like "Bad Influence," "The Hand That Rocks The Cradle" and "The River Wild." And the cast was led by two virtual unknowns from the Southern Hemisphere, with the most recognizable names in the cast being Kim Basinger, whose career was a little on the outs, comedy actor Danny DeVito and recently Oscar-nominated character actor Kevin Spacey.

5 Fall Festival Films That Still Need Distribution

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 18, 2012 11:00 AM
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  • 5 Comments
TIFF remains one of the biggest distribution markets in the world, and with the festival now over, some distributors are walking away with some big prizes. Focus Features took "The Place Beyond The Pines," Lionsgate and/or Roadside Attractions bought a wealth of pictures, including "Imogene," "Thanks For Sharing" and "Stories We Tell," Anchor Bay landed Rob Zombie's "The Lords Of Salem," IFC Films grabbed "Frances Ha" Magnolia won "The Brass Teapot" Dimension picked up "Aftershock," and Sony Pictures Classics took "Wadjda," and these are just a few of the deals that went down at the festival.

TIFF Wrap Up: Our 5 Favorite Films Of The Festival, Plus Our Complete Coverage

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 17, 2012 2:04 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Like most festivals, the Toronto International Film Festival is somewhat frontloaded (much to the complains of many of its attendees), with most of the big films playing on or around the first weekend of the festival. But in fact, the festival wrapped up officially yesterday, and as we speak, The Playlist are officially departing the city for another year.

Derek Cianfrance Talks The Pain Of Editing, The Influence Of 'Napoleon' & 'Psycho' & More In 'Place Beyond The Pines'

  • By Edward Davis
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  • September 14, 2012 2:57 PM
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  • 2 Comments
“I'm interested in telling stories about families,” Derek Cianfrance, the director of “The Place Beyond The Pines,” said this week during the Toronto International Film Festival, where his hotly anticipated drama finally premiered to much acclaim. Cianfrance stormed Sundance in 1998 with “Brother Tied,” a picture that was critically acclaimed at the festival, but then vanished afterwards. It wasn’t until twelve years later that he returned with his sophomore feature effort, “Blue Valentine,” a searing family drama about a marriage in irreparable decay, starring Ryan Gosling and Michelle Williams, which put him squarely back on the map.

Discuss: Is Steven Spielberg's 'Lincoln' Typical Oscar Bait, Or Is There Something More?

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 14, 2012 12:14 PM
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  • 20 Comments
With TIFF peaking earlier this week, by far the biggest story of the past few days has been last night's debut of the trailer for Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln." Probably one of the most anticipated films of the year, the match-up between America's most beloved filmmaker and its most legendary President has seemed like a potent one ever since the project was announced seven years ago. And a casting change -- swapping out Liam Neeson for two-time Oscar-winner Daniel Day-Lewis -- and a star-laden list of supporting players, only made it seem more and more like the film could turn out to be a major achievement.

September DVDs You Should Know About Including 'The Game,' A Trio of Mario Bava Horrors & More

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • September 13, 2012 12:58 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Another month, another slab of worthwhile home video titles gunning for your hard-earned American dollars. This month's slate is an eclectic bunch, featuring cult classics, revenge thrillers, forgotten French films at one point lauded for their complexity and artistry, oh, and Michael Douglas. Read on for the best best in home video for the release of September!

Superheroes, CGI Bears & Channing Tatum: The Box Office Year To Date

  • By Matthew Klekner
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  • September 12, 2012 6:15 PM
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  • 1 Comment
By now you’ve probably heard that summer movie attendance reached the lowest point in the past 20 years (and indeed, this past weekend saw the worst total gross among the top 10 in at least four years). This may come as a surprise to you, but it actually fits into the historical pattern playing out before our eyes. Declining domestic attendance is the new normal and we should all get used to it.

10 Potential Breakout Actors Of The Fall Film Season

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 11, 2012 12:05 PM
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  • 6 Comments
One of the most exciting things about the coming of the fall movie season is the chance to see some new talent emerge from some of the prestige fare that'll be hitting theaters in the next few months. Last year, for instance, saw the likes of Jean Dujardin, Bérénice Bejo, Eddie Redmayne, Rooney Mara, Shailene Woodley, Elizabeth Olsen and Felicity Jones go from virtual unknowns to, if not household names, than certainly performers whose next moves would be watched closely.

Selena Gomez Worried About Her Fans, Harmony Korine Aspired For The “Poetry Of Surfaces”: 'Spring Breakers' At TIFF

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • September 9, 2012 11:31 AM
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  • 5 Comments
“I’m tired of seeing the same thing every single day...there’s more than just Spring break,” Selena Gomez laments in Harmony Korine’s latest feature. “It’s your chance to see something different.” The rather orthodox (well at least for Korine), “Spring Breakers,” which premiered in Venice last week (read our review here), makes its North American debut at the Toronto International Film Festival this week. In our review we called the picture a "semi-conventional genre flick and a future cult favorite.”

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