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The Playlist

Which Directors Picked 'Step Brothers,' 'Rocky III' & 'Babe' Among Their All-Time Favorites On The Sight & Sound Poll?

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • August 23, 2012 10:00 AM
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  • 12 Comments
Undoubtedly our favorite part of the once-a-decade Sight & Sound poll is poring over the Directors' Top 10 lists. We've already seen a small selection from the likes of Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese and Michael Mann, but the BFI have just put every director's ballot online to essentially stop you from getting any work done for the rest of the week.

Summer 2012 Wrap-Up: Which Actors, Directors & Studios Came Out On Top?

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • August 22, 2012 1:00 PM
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  • 8 Comments
With "The Bourne Legacy" and "The Expendables 2" landing over the last couple of weekends, we're pretty much at the tail end of the tentpole-laden summer movie season. The rest of the month finds classic late-August programmers like "Premium Rush," "The Apparition" and "The Possession" hitting theaters before attention will be turned to the fall festival season with Venice, Telluride, TIFF, and NYFF all on the way.

The Essentials: The 5 Best Tony Scott Films

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • August 20, 2012 11:59 AM
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  • 11 Comments
Something we've come to appreciate since the terrible news of the passing of director Tony Scott came in this morning, is that there's an argument to be made that almost any one of his films saw him at the top of his game. From debut feature "The Hunger," one of the first movies of the MTV generation, and the era-defining "Top Gun," all the way to the bold formal experimentation of his last four films (some of which, especially the highly divisive "Domino," were derided by many, but have their fervent auteurist supporters as well), his films were always technically impeccable, thrilling and instantly recognizable as a Tony Scott picture. He was the action director as auteur.

Sight And Sound Top 250 By The Numbers: And The Auteur With The Most Films Is...

  • By The Playlist
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  • August 17, 2012 12:56 PM
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  • 27 Comments
Who’s the greatest auteur in cinema? Is it Alfred Hitchock who stands tall with “Vertigo” as #1 in the Sight And Sound’s 2012 Greatest Films Of All Time List and has five films on the entire list (which is now 250 films long)? It is Orson Welles who has been the reigning champion with “Citizen Kane” at the number #1 slot for five decades now? Or is it Ozu Yasujirō, who was listed as the top auteur by all the directors polled in this list?

5 "Unfilmable" Novels That Became Movies & 5 More That Are On The Way

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • August 17, 2012 11:59 AM
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  • 23 Comments
Like a red rag to a bull, the term "unfilmable novel" elicits about the same reaction for filmmakers as it does for Chief Wiggum in "The Simpsons" when he tells Ralph not to go into "the forbidden closet of mystery." Some of the greatest works of literature have been deemed, correctly or not, as unfilmable, and yet writers, directors, producers and stars keep trying, either developing such projects for years with no success, or very occasionally getting the films financed, usually with mixed success.

30 Essential Films Missing From The Sight & Sound Top 100

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • August 16, 2012 12:20 PM
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  • 26 Comments
The trouble with a list is that not everyone is going to agree. What's often offered as a personal selection of favorites can often be taken by a reader as a personal affront, a sign of snobbery or boorishness, even if a list is a compilation from multiple contributors. And as the fuss over the Sight & Sound Greatest Films Of All Time poll reminds us, that'll likely always be the case. After all, we know that it's all just a fun exercise, and yet looking over the full list (published today on the magazine's website along with the 800-odd submissions from critics all of the world), we still feel the pang of the absence of some of our own favorites.

Sight & Sound Unveil Full 'Greatest Films Of All Time' List; Robert Altman, Ridley Scott & More Crack Top 100

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • August 16, 2012 10:31 AM
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  • 26 Comments
Following the reveal at the beginning of the month of the top 50 on the Sight & Sound Greatest Films Of All Time, which caused plenty of debate on its own with "Veritgo" taking over the top spot from "Citizen Kane," the BFI have pulled up the curtain on the entire results of their once-a-decade poll of over 800 critics, academics and festival programmers all over the world.

Discuss: With 'Raiders Of The Lost Ark' Going IMAX, Is The Format Becoming The New 3D?

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • August 15, 2012 2:08 PM
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  • 8 Comments
There has been something of a trend recently for re-releasing older fare in 3D, with Disney and Pixar movies, "Titanic," "Star Wars" and, next summer, "Jurassic Park" and "Independence Day" all getting the treatment. It's the new-money-for-old-rope-approach to the movies, and while these aren't guaranteed phenomenons (although "Titanic" did extraordinarily well internationally, especially in China, and "The Lion King" topped the box office in the U.S. last fall), they've been something of a no-brainer so far, allowing studios to get many millions of dollars through fairly minimal effort.

5 Things You Might Not Know About 'Bonnie & Clyde'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • August 14, 2012 3:05 PM
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  • 1 Comment
It's almost impossible to overstate the influence of Arthur Penn's "Bonnie & Clyde." It wasn't alone as one of the film breaking down the walls of a "new cinema" -- Michaelangelo Antonioni's "Blow Up" had turned heads the previous year, and Mike Nichols' "The Graduate" helped with the impression of the changing of the guard when it followed a few months later. But it was Penn's film (written by journalists Robert Benton and David Newman, with a polish from Robert Towne and produced by Warren Beatty), which told the story of Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker, the Depression-era bank robbing duo, that really felt like the lightning strike, bringing the techniques, sexuality, violence and cool-factor of European cinema to a mainstream audience for the first time.

5 Things You Might Not Know About 'Fast Times At Ridgemont High'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • August 13, 2012 1:02 PM
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  • 0 Comments
One of the trickier genres to get right is the teen comedy. Walking the line between not condescending to a high-school-age audience and yet also not alienating them is a difficult balance, let alone making a film that doesn't age, feels truthful, and can be smart and funny as well. And one of the finest examples of the genre remains to this day, "Fast Times at Ridgemont High."

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