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The Playlist

The Snubs & Surprises Of The 2012 Emmy Nominations

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 20, 2012 11:14 AM
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  • 5 Comments
You can't please everyone. And award ceremonies, in particular, never please everybody. Voted for by a small group, who are more often than not much older than those in the media, or who watch the shows, awards nominations and the eventual winners are generally frustrating, whether it's in the music, movie or television world. And this year's batch of Emmy nods are no exception.

The Films Of Christopher Nolan: A Retrospective

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 19, 2012 2:04 PM
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  • 25 Comments
We can all agree at this point that a certain sub-set of Christopher Nolan's fans are out of hand, what with the death threats to critics and all. But even if we were one of those who didn't like "The Dark Knight Rises," or indeed the rest of Nolan's output, we suspect that we'd still be glad he existed. While some might find his movies humorless (though we'd disagree), or chilly (though we'd disagree), or overly rigid (we'd... mostly disagree), but no one else is making films like Christopher Nolan, taking nine figures of Warner Bros.' money, pairing it with big ideas and concepts, and making resoundingly entertaining and thought-provoking blockbusters.

5 Things You Might Not Know About 'The Dark Knight'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 19, 2012 10:03 AM
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  • 3 Comments
"Batman Begins" had been a modest hit, taking nearly $400 million worldwide, but given that "Superman Returns" made slightly more in 2006, and failed to launch a franchise, Christopher Nolan had to really push the boat out for his second film. And he certainly did. "The Dark Knight" was longer, bigger and better than its predecessor, pioneering the use of IMAX cameras in feature films and introducing one of the most unforgettable performances in genre movies, in the shape of Heath Ledger's Joker, who became an instant icon the moment the first trailer appeared.

The Playlist Predicts The 2012 Emmy Nominations

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 18, 2012 1:16 PM
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  • 5 Comments
Yeah, yeah, yeah, "The Dark Knight Rises", blah blah blah. Friday might be the day that many movie-watchers have been waiting for for four years, but tomorrow sees one of the biggest points of the year for watchers of the small screen; namely, the announcement of the Emmy nominations.

10 Songs From 'Batman' Soundtracks You Probably Forgot About

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • July 18, 2012 12:01 PM
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  • 22 Comments
One of the more notable aspects, as far as tie-ins go, with the three Christopher Nolan Batman movies, is that there isn't a single pop song in the entire cluster of them. They are entirely pop-song-free, which is really something considering how soundtrack-driven the last batch of Batman movies were (beginning with the Prince-fuelled Tim Burton original and continuing through the two Joel Schumacher tragedies). In honor of "The Dark Knight Rises" (which really is as good as everyone is saying), we look back to the ten jams that defined the Dark Knight (that you might have forgotten about). All of these tunes are perfect for your next night out in Gotham City.

5 Things You Might Not Know About 'Batman Begins'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 18, 2012 9:56 AM
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  • 9 Comments
While we appreciate that you're probably focused on this Friday's release of Daniel Auteil's directorial debut "The Well-Digger's Daughter," this week also sees the release of one other little film: "The Dark Knight Rises," the third and final chapter of Christopher Nolan's reinvention of the Batman character and world. The most critically acclaimed superhero franchise to date, the films have seen Nolan (who before turning to the series had only made three movies, all relatively small-budgeted thrillers) take a grounded approach, tackling the on-the-surface silly premise of a man dressing up as a bat to fight crime, and making it psychologically plausiuble in a way that's proven endlessly influential on tentpoles ever since.

Discuss: Is The Golden Age Of Pixar Over?

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • July 17, 2012 4:09 PM
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  • 23 Comments
With the news today that Disney and Pixar are moving forward with a sequel to their beloved 2003 masterpiece "Finding Nemo" (to be helmed, once again, by Andrew Stanton, apparently newly freed from director jail after this spring's notorious flop "John Carter"), it is another indication that Pixar has truly been absorbed into the Disney bloodstream. Even though it's arguably one of the least open-ended movies Pixar has ever made, Disney is intent on wringing more dollars from its name brand and all the squishy toys that can be made from various aquatic wildlife. It's enough, with Pixar's recent string of sequels and the creative fogginess of this summer's "Brave," to wonder: is the Golden Age of Pixar truly over?

Discuss: Is Marvel Afraid Of Making A 'Black Panther' Movie?

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 17, 2012 3:40 PM
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  • 25 Comments
For a major studio who do nothing but make blockbuster tentpole movies, Marvel do, to their credit, take their fare share of risks. Casting Robert Downey Jr, an actor coming out of a decade or so of drug and alcohol addiction, and whose last film as a lead, "Kiss Kiss Bang Bang" made under $5 million at the box office, as the lead in "Iron Man" was certainly a risk, but one that paid off handsomely.

5 Things You Might Not Know About Paul Verhoeven's 'Robocop,' Released 25 Years Ago Today

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 17, 2012 2:53 PM
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  • 5 Comments
We're just over a year away from seeing "Robocop" back on screens, in a remake/reboot with "Elite Squad" director Jose Padilha making his English-language debut on the film, and an impressive cast featuring Joel Kinnaman, Gary Oldman, Abbie Cornish, Samuel L. Jackson and Hugh Laurie . A viral video has already appeared, and this weekend saw banners from the film debut at Comic-Con.

The Films Of Jim Jarmusch: A Retrospective

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • July 17, 2012 11:09 AM
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  • 6 Comments
There's no one in independent film quite like Jim Jarmusch, one of American cinema's most idiosyncratic filmmakers. Born to Episcopalian parents in Ohio in 1953, the director fell in love with B-movie double bills his mother left him in as a child, and fell into counter-culture arthouse movies in his teens. The director studied Journalism at Northwestern before dropping out and studying literature at Columbia, moving to Paris for ten months and then returning and applying to the film school at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts, where he worked under legendary "Rebel Without A Cause" director Nicholas Ray, who encouraged the filmmaker's unique, particular approach.

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