The Playlist

5 Things You Might Not Know About David Lean's 'Lawrence Of Arabia'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 18, 2012 3:12 PM
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  • 12 Comments
Is there a greater film than "Lawrence of Arabia?" Perhaps. There are certainly few longer ones, or few that are more epic and sweeping in their scope (thanks to the timeless Panavision 70 photography by Freddie Young). But even if the film isn't your absolute favorite, it is the number one of many, including Steven Spielberg, who credits the picture with making him want to be a filmmaker.

The 10 Best Dennis Hopper Performances

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 17, 2012 1:45 PM
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  • 9 Comments
It's almost two years since the passing of one of cinema's true wild men, Dennis Hopper. The actor, writer and director was a maverick titan of cinema, a man who starred in some of the most pictures of American cinema, from "Rebel Without A Cause" to "Blue Velvet," while also writing and directing a film that arguably changed the movies forever, "Easy Rider," while maintaining a personal life that was decidedly colorful (for full details, read Peter Biskind's modern classic "Easy Riders, Raging Bulls."

Nicole Holofcener, Shari Springer Berman & Lisa Cholodenko Talk Future Projects & Being Female Directors In The Film Industry

  • By Jen Vineyard
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  • May 17, 2012 1:25 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Nicole Holofcener and Shari Springer Berman might make very different kinds of films, but they have at least one thing in common -- they both hate being in front of the camera. "If I wanted to be in front of the camera ..." Springer Berman started as Holofcener finished her thought for her, "you'd be Lena Dunham." "I didn't even want to take photos at my wedding," Springer Berman confessed. "I hate being photographed."

On The Rise 2012: 10 Directors Who Look To Be Bright Sparks Of The Future

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 15, 2012 2:33 PM
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  • 14 Comments
Like it or not, filmmaking is undeniably a director's medium. It wasn't always like that, of course: it was only the coming of the auteur theory in the 1950s and 1960s that popularized the idea of the director as the person responsible for all that was great and terrible about a picture. And while anyone who's worked in film knows that it's a collaborative medium, there's still no better way of seeing where the form might be going in the next few years than by looking at the directors who've been making splashes of late.

5 Things You Might Not Know About John Milius' 'Conan The Barbarian'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 14, 2012 11:20 AM
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  • 4 Comments
These days, after "Lord of the Rings" and "Game Of Thrones," fantasy isn't just big business, but it can also be an critically acclaimed awards favorite, picking up Oscars and Emmys by the handful. As such, it's easy to forget that prior to the 1980s, the genre barely existed on screen, with animated takes on Tolkein's works the only really significant pictures in the genre. But in 1977, "Star Wars," a film that owed as much to high fantasy as to science-fiction, became the biggest hit in history, and that opened the door to all kinds of new fantasy worlds.

Reacting To 'Twilight,' Potential Sequels & More From The Press Tour For Tim Burton & Johnny Depp's 'Dark Shadows'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 11, 2012 2:07 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Whether you end up loving it or hating it (as our reviewer did), one has to admit that there are few films like "Dark Shadows" in theaters this summer. Based on the popular 1960s/1970s ABC soap that included vampires, werewolves and witches, the film is a curious blend of comedy, drama and horror that's indelibly a Tim Burton creation.

10 Unmade Tim Burton Films: From 'After Hours' To 'Superman Lives' & More

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 11, 2012 1:00 PM
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  • 6 Comments
It's curious that a director as idiosyncratic and... well, just plain weird as Tim Burton has become one of Hollywood's A-listers. But from 1989's "Batman" to 2010's billion-dollar grossing "Alice in Wonderland," the helmer's managed to turn his dark, gothic imagination into something that genuinely captures the hearts and minds of the general public. Indeed, films like "The Nightmare Before Christmas" and the upcoming "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter," which are produced by Burton, show that he, like Alfred Hitchcock before him, has become one of the few directors who's become a true brand name: if they see his name involved with a project, an audience know what to expect, whether he directed it or not.

The Essentials: Tim Burton's 5 Best Films

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • May 10, 2012 3:10 PM
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  • 35 Comments
Tomorrow sees "Dark Shadows" will hit theaters, the latest gothic entertainment from director Tim Burton and his muse Johnny Depp. And, as per our review, and many others, it's sadly an another disappointment, another wonderful-looking, empty picture that seems to have been derived from the filmmaker and his star taking on the kind of picture that's expected of them, rather than something to push or challenge them.

The Playlist's 15 Most Anticipated Films Of The Cannes Film Festival

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 9, 2012 1:13 PM
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  • 15 Comments
A week from today, the 65th annual Cannes Film Festival will be getting underway on the south coast of France, opening with Wes Anderson's "Moonrise Kingdom," and as ever, it's possibly the biggest date in the cinephile calendar, with a host of hotly-anticipated films set to premiere over the ten days that follow. A jury headed up by Nanni Moretti, and also including Andrea Arnold, Ewan McGregor, Alexander Payne, Diane Kruger and Jean-Paul Gaultier will have to decide which of over twenty films to award the Palme d'Or to, but while the competition will be typically fierce in competition, there's plenty of gems to find in the Directors' Fortnight, Un Certain Regard and Critics' Week sidebars too.

5 Things You Might Not Know About Alfred Hitchcock's Masterpiece 'Vertigo'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 9, 2012 9:56 AM
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  • 7 Comments
Voting is currently underway on the Sight & Sound poll for the greatest film ever made, which takes place every ten years, and is generally seen as one of the most definitive of such polls. And one film that's near-certain to place in the top ten, given that it's been there in every poll since 1982 (and placed second in 2002) is Alfred Hitchcock's "Vertigo." The film was relatively poorly received on release, and indeed, remained unseen for twenty years, one of the five films that Hitchcock bought back the rights for to leave to his daughter (the so-called Five Lost Hitchcocks, which also include "The Man Who Knew Too Much," "Rear Window," "Rope" and "The Trouble With Harry"). But since its re-release in 1984, the film has grown into the great director's most acclaimed masterpiece, and is now one of the most examined, deconstructed and written about films in the history of the medium.

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