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The Playlist

Videodrome: The Best Recent Music Videos, Featuring Aesop Rock, Family Band, Caveman & A Band Of Buriers

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 11, 2012 1:05 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Once again, it's time for the return of Videodrome, our semi-regular showcase for the best music videos around. Since the form has given the world game-changing helmers in both the blockbuster and arthouse realms, it's always important to keep an eye on promos, and indeed, one could argue that there's more invention to be found in the short form than there is in features. So, without further ado, the five best music videos we've seen in the last few weeks. As ever, any tips and suggestions are more than welcome.

Comic-Con '12 Preview: What To Expect From Nerd Bonnaroo This Year

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 10, 2012 1:17 PM
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  • 2 Comments
If you're expecting to hear news about tiny indie projects and foreign auteurs in the latter half of this week, you may be disappointed. Tomorrow night is the kick-off of San Diego Comic-Con, the biggest such event in the world, and one that, over the years, has become a major part of the marketing calendar for some of Hollywood's biggest blockbusters. While we still wonder about how effective if it is (see our recent piece), and several studios are skipping this year, including Paramount and Universal, there's still some big-name guests and unveilings taking place between Wednesday and Sunday, and it'll undoubtedly be the major story of the week, movie-wise.

Discuss: 4D Is Coming To U.S. Theaters, Will You Care?

  • By Edward Davis
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  • July 9, 2012 5:25 PM
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  • 25 Comments
Evidently films presented in stereoscopic 3D just aren't enough these days. Though 3D hasn't revolutioned cinema or the box-office quite like Hollywood hoped -- look at "The Amazing Spider-Man" which has had an impressive opening, but inflation and 3D prices still can't match the old series' opening weekends -- it's not going anywhere and it's still going to be an excellent financial pad for generally entertaining four quadrant films (see "The Avengers," which showed it can greatly boost a runaway hit, but was hardly the sole reason behinf the film's success). 
More: 4D

We Read It: Picking A Director & Cast For The 'Fifty Shades of Grey' Movie

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 9, 2012 3:12 PM
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  • 96 Comments
"Fifty Shades Of Grey," along with sequels "Fifty Shades Darker" and "Fifty Shades Freed" is a publishing phenomenon the likes of which haven't been seen since "Twilight." The book, by EL James (a pseudonym for British TV executive Erika Leonard), actually started as fan-fiction for characters from Stephenie Meyer's books, entitled "Master Of The Universe," later reworked, extended and republished as a stand-alone piece, and released as an e-book over three volumes between May 2011 and January 2012.

5 Things You Might Not Know About Disney's 'Tron,' Released 30 Years Ago Today

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 9, 2012 10:55 AM
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  • 1 Comment
As has been discussed ad infinitum this year, on its 30th anniversary, the summer of 1982 holds a very special place in the hearts of geeks of a certain age; between May and August, a number of films now deemed genre classics hit theaters, proving to be a life-changing experience for many. "Conan The Barbarian," "E.T," "Blade Runner," "The Thing," "Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan" -- all have only grown in reputation over time. And one of the last of that wave, Disney's "Tron," perhaps inspired one of the most fervent cults of them all.

The Essentials: The 5 Best John Frankenheimer Films

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • July 6, 2012 1:57 PM
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  • 6 Comments
Few filmmakers these days name John Frankenheimer as an influence. He was never particularly trendy, never embraced by the auteurists or overtly paid homage by those who came after. In part, it's because of some of his later projects; the commercial failure of thriller "Black Sunday" in 1977 drove him to alcoholism that lasted for several years (it was only when he was reduced to drinking on the set of martial arts actioner "The Challenge" in 1981 that he checked himself into rehab), and some of his later projects, including his final film, "Reindeer Games," and the famous disaster "The Island Of Doctor Moreau" (on which the helmer replaced Richard Stanley several weeks into production) meant his critical reputation took a hit.

'The Amazing Spider-Man': The Good, The Bad & The Ugly

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • July 6, 2012 12:26 PM
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  • 38 Comments
Marc Webb's "The Amazing Spider-Man," the second of this summer's three massive superhero movies, is now in theaters. And while so far it's performing behind "Spider-Man 3," the film's doing reasonably well (expected to haul in somewhere in the neighborhood of $130 million by Sunday) given the lack of enthusiasm from hardcore fans, and the widespread dislike of the final Sam Raimi film, which in part helped to push things toward a blank slate again. And reviews have been pretty severely divided, with some hailing it as one of best examples of the comic book genre to date, and others loathing every frame of it.

The Essentials: The Films Of Rob Reiner (Before He Forgot How To Direct Movies)

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 5, 2012 1:09 PM
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  • 8 Comments
Maybe it's just a particular hang-up of this writer, but we find one of cinema's greatest mysteries to be the question of what happened to Rob Reiner. The sitcom star, and son of the great Carl Reiner ("Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid," "The Jerk"), became a film director in the early 1980s, and had an extraordinary, almost unmatched run across the next eight years, helming seven diverse and hugely-acclaimed films that have become enshrined as some of the finest of their era. Few filmmakers, at least within the mainstream, can make a claim to a consecutive string like it.

10 TV Stars Who Deserve Emmy Nominations (But Probably Won't Get Them)

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 5, 2012 12:02 PM
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  • 26 Comments
We're still months and months away from the Oscars, but the other awards ceremony of the moving image is starting to sneak up; two weeks from today, the nominations for the Primetime Emmys, the biggest awards honoring television comedies, dramas, miniseries and movies, will be announced, ahead of the ceremony itself in September. Given the stars that the small screen attracts these days, it's just as glitzy as the Academy Awards, and given that we're living in what's generally deemed to be something of a golden age of television, there are more good shows on the air than could possibly be honored in a single ceremony. Someone's going to miss out.

The Films Of Oliver Stone: A Retrospective

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • July 5, 2012 11:05 AM
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  • 16 Comments
Oliver Stone loves his country, but he is also its loudest critic. Whether tackling history head-on in films like "Platoon" or "Born On The Fourth Of July," or profiling presidents in "JFK," "W." and "Nixon," and even in seemingly genre-centered material like "Natural Born Killers" or "Any Given Sunday," Stone views America in his own unique, if sometimes contradictory ways. His track record is certainly marked by tremendous highs, definite lows and curious middles (mostly with genre excursions like "U-Turn," "Any Given Sunday" and "The Doors") but he is never one to sit still. For evidence of Stone's constantly changing priorities one can look to his last few films — "World Trade Center," "W.," "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps" — and truly get a sense of a director driven both by passion and finance, and by a love for his country that is also pained by its failings.

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