The Playlist

Who Should Direct 'Catching Fire'? 5 Directors We Think Could Do The Job

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 11, 2012 9:59 AM
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  • 20 Comments
So, writer-director Gary Ross, having helped make "The Hunger Games" into a gigantic hit, has decided to move on to new pastures. As we reported last week, Ross will be focusing on a new project, and after a few days, Lionsgate officially confirmed he will not be helming "Catching Fire," with both the studio and the director issuing formal statements.

On The Rise 2012: 5 Screenwriters To Keep An Eye On In The Next Few Years

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 10, 2012 11:59 AM
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  • 13 Comments
Unlike in theater or television, writers generally get the short end of the stick in the movie business. When a film doesn't work, the script is blamed, when it does work, the director gets credit. Writers get fired, rehired, fired again, rewritten and screwed out of credit. But that's not to say that once they get the momentum behind them, a screenwriter can't become just as talked about as actors, actresses and directors around Hollywood watering holes and meeting rooms.

The Essentials: 5 Of Michael Curtiz's Greatest Films

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 10, 2012 11:05 AM
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  • 6 Comments
The coming of the auteur theory has meant that filmmakers like Michael Curtiz no longer get much sway among current generations of directors. Curtiz (born Kertész Kaminer Manó in Hungary in 1886), was a workman, a man who flourished in the studio system after being picked out by Jack Warner for his Austrian Biblical epic "Moon of Israel" in 1924). He stayed at the studio for nearly 20 years, taking on whateer he was assigned at a terrifyingly prolific worklate - he made over 100 Hollywood movies up to "The Comancheros" in 1961. And some of them are terrible, as you might expect.

To Get Ready for 'Cabin in the Woods,' Here Are The Top 5 Cabin Movies

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • April 10, 2012 10:05 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Everything from “The Truman Show” to John Carpenter’s “Halloween” is chopped up and blended in the pop culture Cuisinart that is Drew Goddard and Joss Whedon’s irrepressible “Cabin in the Woods.” But it quite clearly owes a certain debt to a very specific type of horror sub-genre set primarily in a rickety homestead in the forest, one just desolate or decrepit enough to be rife with the possibility of evil spirits, demented madmen, psychic trauma… or all of the above. When Whedon originally came to Goddard with the concept, he gleefully suggested making a “cabin movie.” While “Cabin in the Woods” ended up being much more than that (it's an acidic takedown and euphoric celebration of all things horror), we wanted to briefly cite five of the films that contributed, either directly or through the pop culture ether, to “Cabin in the Woods.”

5 Things You May Not Know About The 'The Godfather Part II'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 9, 2012 1:00 PM
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  • 5 Comments
A sprawling three hour and twenty minute American epic crime film, what can you say about Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Godfather Part II” that hasn’t already been said? Nominated for 11 Academy Awards and winning six, including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Actor in a Supporting Role for Robert De Niro “The Godfather Part II” was met with tremendous critical acclaim with many critics claiming it had outdone its predecessor. Award- wise, it had. The original had also bagged 11 nominations, but only had won three.

The Films Of Sidney Lumet: A Retrospective

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 9, 2012 11:00 AM
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  • 13 Comments
Lumet was never fancy. He never needed to be, as a master of blocking, economic camera movements and framing that empowered the emotion and or exact punctuation of a particular scene. First and foremost, as you’ve likely heard ad nauseum -- but hell, it’s true -- Lumet was a storyteller, and one that preferred his beloved New York to soundstages (though let's not romanticize it too much, he did his fair share of work on studio film sets too as most TV journeyman and early studio filmmakers did).

5 Things You Might Not Know About 'The Conversation'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 9, 2012 10:09 AM
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  • 7 Comments
Two milestones hit for Francis Ford Coppola this weekend. The legendary filmmaker celebrated his 73rd birthday on Saturday, April 7th (happy belated, Francis) and, on the same day, observed the 38th anniversary of the opening of one of his most artistic efforts, 1974’s “The Conversation.”

The Films Of Whit Stillman: A Retrospective

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • April 6, 2012 12:04 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Famously dubbed the “the WASP Woody Allen” and the “Dickens of people with too much inner life” by reviewers and critics when his comedy-of-manners indie pictures arrived in the early 1990s, Whit Stillman’s ironic, clever and urbane examinations of upward and downward social mobility and the shallow concerns and preoccupations of the young, privileged and affluent won him a legion of adoring fans as soon as his first film premiered at Cannes. Evincing a polished sensibility through a send-up and celebration of the often ridiculous customs and etiquettes of upper-class social orders, Stillman is also a champion of the overlooked merits of conservative status quo conventions.

The Essentials: 6 Great Warren Oates Films On The 30th Anniversary Of His Death

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • April 6, 2012 10:01 AM
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  • 15 Comments
Tuesday marked thirty years since the untimely passing of Warren Oates. The great, grizzled actor's work has fallen somewhat out of fashion these days -- few, bar perhaps Quentin Tarantino, name Sam Peckinpah or Monte Hellman, Oates' closest and most frequent collaborators, as influences. If you're familiar with him at all, it's likely from his parts as outlaw Lyle Gorch in "The Wild Bunch" or as Sgt. Hulka in Bill Murray comedy "Stripes." But for a time in the 1970s, Oates was Hollywood's go-to-badass, a man who everyone from Norman Jewison and William Friedkin to Steven Spielberg and Terrence Malick wanted to work with.

5 April DVD Titles You Should Know About, Including 'Chinatown,' 'A Trip To The Moon' & 'Girl On A Motorcycle'

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • April 4, 2012 2:05 PM
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  • 8 Comments
While the future of home entertainment may be rapidly moving towards a digital streaming-led future, we can't be the only movie nerds who still love owning a physical copy of something. Sure, Blu-Ray and DVD might be scratchable, easily lost and adorned by terrible box art, but there's something about the feeling of finding an undiscovered gem in the depths of a store, or getting a rarity in the post, that doesn't quite compare to clicking and watching something on Netflix.

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