Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

The Playlist

The Playlist Soundtrack Series Revisited: Wes Anderson

  • By The Playlist
  • |
  • May 25, 2012 2:58 PM
  • |
  • 10 Comments
In 2006, before I started The Playlist film blog, out of boredom I began what I called the The Playlist Soundtrack Series. A sort of "If I Were _______ (insert filmmaker's name here)" type thing. The concept was naive and simple: choose a handful of music-savvy filmmakers whose work I admired and create imaginary soundtracks for movies they hadn't made, based on their taste and music they might conceivably use one day. It began as nothing more than a fun exercise for me, as I had time on my hands back then.

Make Your Own Mixtape: 17 Songs From Wes Anderson's Films That Are Not On The Official Soundtracks

  • By Rodrigo Perez
  • |
  • May 25, 2012 1:34 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Today sees the latest film from director Wes Anderson, "Moonrise Kingdom," hit theaters, and consistent with the music-obsessed filmmaker's work, it's as much a treat for the ears as it is for the eyes. 'Moonrise' boasts another soundtrack of unexpected cuts assembled with the great music supervisor Randall Poster, including Francoise Hardy, Hank Williams, and for the first time, a significant amount of classical music including Benjamin Britten and Leonard Bernstein. And if that's not enough, there's also additional pieces by Alexandre Desplat and drum percussion by old musical cohort Mark Mothersbaugh.

Cannes: Guy Pearce Talks Playing Camp & Shaving His Eyebrows In 'Lawless'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • May 25, 2012 11:01 AM
  • |
  • 4 Comments
It takes a fair amount of talent to appear in a film alongside practiced scene-stealers like Tom Hardy, Gary Oldman, Jessica Chastain, Mia Wasikowska, Jason Clarke and Shia LaBeouf. But of course, as audiences have been aware of for getting on two decades, since he came to attention in "The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen Of The Desert," Guy Pearce is possessed of an unusual amount of talent.

5 Things You Might Not Know About Ridley Scott's 'Alien'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • May 25, 2012 10:03 AM
  • |
  • 5 Comments
The success of "Star Wars" changed everything. While "2001" had been a giant hit a decade ago, most put it down to a fluke, but George Lucas' film suddenly proved that science fiction wasn't just for B-movies, but could be a licence to print money. Every studio in town were chasing the genre, but 20th Century Fox, who had distributed "Star Wars" had a head-start: they already had another space-set script in development, "Alien," by Dan O'Bannon, Ronald Shusett, Walter Hill and David Giler. They swiftly attached new helmer Ridley Scott to the project, and production got underway in the summer of 1978.

Cannes: Andrew Dominik On The Violence, Politics & Look Of 'Killing Them Softly' With Brad Pitt

  • By Aaron Hillis
  • |
  • May 24, 2012 2:19 PM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
In what turned out to be a banner year for the movies, "The Assassination of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford" ended up somewhat overshadowed. As fellow neo-Westerns "There Will Be Blood" and "No Country For Old Men" swept up plaudits and Oscars, the picture, the second by Australian director Andrew Dominik, received some raves, but plenty of negative notices too, and it ended up making a miniscule amount at the box office. But by decade's end, many had since rediscovered the picture as one of the finest of the 00s, and as such, Dominik's first film since, crime tale "Killing Them Softly," was one of the most eagerly anticipated pictures of the Cannes film festival this year.

'Lawless' Director John Hillcoat: The American Film Landscape Is “Tough”; Television Is The New Medium For “Character & Drama”

  • By Benjamin Wright
  • |
  • May 24, 2012 11:06 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Australian filmmaker John Hillcoat has steadily built upon his career as an auteur known for brooding and unnerving pieces of work ever since his neo-western “The Proposition” started making the rounds in 2005. The picture offered viewers a refreshing take on the western genre, and a haunting tale of a crooked lawman who apprehends a notorious outlaw and gives him just nine days to take the life his older sibling or see his youngest brother executed.

“Sentimentality & Brute Violence”: Nick Cave Says The Love Story & Excessive Violence Of 'Lawless' “Titillate Me”

  • By Benjamin Wright
  • |
  • May 23, 2012 5:47 PM
  • |
  • 6 Comments
While many still know Nick Cave best for his work as a musician in groups like The Birthday Party, and especially for albums such as Let Love In and Tender Prey that he produced along with his band The Bad Seeds, Cave has become increasingly more visible in the world of cinema ever since he first started collaborating with filmmaker John Hillcoat on the helmer’s 1988 feature “Ghosts…of the Civil Undead.”

Cannes: 'Killing Them Softly' Helmer Andrew Dominik Talks Music As Film: 'Jesse James' Was My Leonard Cohen Song, 'Killing Them Softly' Is A Pop Tune

  • By Benjamin Wright
  • |
  • May 23, 2012 3:01 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
A film that probably needs no introduction at this point, “The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford” filmmaker Andrew Dominik’s “Killing Them Softly” has been setting the Croisette ablaze with high praises coming from all around, including our own reviewer who called it “brilliant and angry,” and most notably “the anti-thriller for our times.”

The Playlist Interview From Cannes: Wes Anderson Discusses The Nostalgia, Music, & Making Of 'Moonrise Kingdom'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • May 23, 2012 12:31 PM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
Few filmmakers have a more distinctive take on the world than Wes Anderson. Many of his contemporaries -- David O Russell, Darren Aronofsky, Spike Jonze et al -- are extraordinary filmmakers, but it's only with Anderson that you can look at a single frame -- any frame -- and instantly know that it's his. And the same is true of his latest, "Moonrise Kingdom," which marks his return to live-action filmmaking for the first time in five years.

Cannes: Michel Gondry Talks The Inspirations Behind 'The We And The I,' & Talks Criterion Appearance On 'Malkovich'

  • By The Playlist
  • |
  • May 22, 2012 4:35 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Perhaps once regarded as a quirky, whimsical visualist known for his eye-popping music videos (Bjork, Beck, White Stripes) and his often pop-surrealist indie films ("Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind," "The Science of Sleep"), French filmmaker Michel Gondry has really challenged the boilerplate concept of who he is as an artist in recent years. He's taken on a tentpole super-hero film ("The Green Hornet" starring Seth Rogen), made a stylistically unadorned and deeply personal, yet unsentimental documentary about his aunt ("The Thorn In The Side") and another superficially quirky mainstream comedy that's actually quite the sincere and tribute to the joys of community ("Be Kind Rewind").

Email Updates

Recent Comments