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The Playlist

In Memory Of William Finley (1942-2012), 5 Things You Might Not Know About 'Phantom Of The Paradise'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 16, 2012 11:05 AM
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  • 11 Comments
Sad news came in over the weekend, as it was announced yesterday that actor William Finley, best known for his work with Brian De Palma, had passed away on Saturdayat the age of 69. The actor was a long-time friend of De Palma, having appeared in his early films "Woton's Wake," "Murder a la Mod" and "The Wedding Party," before turning heads as Emil Breton, the husband of Margot Kidder's character, in the director's breakout picture "Sisters."

The Playlist's 15 Most Anticipated Films Of The 2012 Tribeca Film Festival

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 16, 2012 10:02 AM
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  • 5 Comments
This year's Tribeca Film Festival carries one of its strongest line-ups in years. In addition to films from Cannes, Venice, Toronto, Sundance and Berlin circuit, there's also a wealth of U.S. premieres or lesser-known festival movies in the line-up that look just as promising this time around; after a relatively weak SXSW, it looks like the East Coast is getting some of the good stuff.

5 Things You Might Not Know About 'Say Anything'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 13, 2012 10:03 AM
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  • 5 Comments
Say Anything
"Say Anything" was not particularly successful on its release. John Cusack was an established star of films like "The Sure Thing," but co-star Ione Skye was basically unknown, and director Cameron Crowe was, despite his writing credit on "Fast Times At Ridgemont High" eight years earlier, not a known quantity. As such, despite rave reviews, it only took $20 million at the domestic box office, and a meagre $733,000 internationally -- indeed, in many territories, like the U.K, it went straight to video.

Videodrome: The Best In Recent Music Videos Including Jack White, Drake, Benga & More

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 12, 2012 12:59 PM
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  • 1 Comment
In case you missed it, we resurrected our old Videodrome column a few weeks back: our semi-regular showcase for the best music videos around. Given that the form has given the world game-changing helmers in both the blockbuster and arthouse worlds, it's always important to keep an eye on promos, and indeed, one could argue that there's more invention to be found in the short-form than there is in features. So, with no further ado, the five best music videos we've seen in the last few weeks. As ever, any tips and suggestions are more than welcome.

5 Things You Might Not Know About 'Mad Max'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 12, 2012 10:59 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Any day now, director George Miller will finally get rolling in Namibia on "Fury Road," the long-awaited continuation of the "Mad Max" series. Starring Tom Hardy in the role that launched Mel Gibson's career, with a cast that also includes Charlize Theron and Nicholas Hoult, the film's been in the works for years, but to be getting underway in the next month or two.

The Essentials: The Films Of John Milius

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 12, 2012 10:04 AM
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  • 17 Comments
All those who complain about the liberal domination of Hollywood have never come across John Milius. A film school pal of George Lucas and Steven Spielberg, Milius had tried to join the Marine Corp, but was turned away due to his asthma. Instead, he channeled his frustrations into both a life-long obsession with firearms (he was paid for "Jeremiah Johnson" in antique weaponry, and has served on the NRA Board of Directors,) and making some of the most masculine, testosterone-filled movies of all time, both as an acclaimed writer and as a director. The basis for both Paul Le Mat's character in "American Graffiti" and Walter in "The Big Lebowski" -- the Coens are friends of Milius, and offered him the part of Jack Lipnick in "Barton Fink" -- he's one of film history's most singular, colorful characters.

5 Things You Might Not Know About Steven Spielberg's Game-Changing 'Jaws'

  • By The Playlist
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  • April 11, 2012 11:23 AM
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  • 15 Comments
You know what’s a fun task? Trying to convince anyone that Steven Spielberg’s 1975 “Jaws” is not an American classic and a nearly flawless film. It’s kind of impossible, and if you were to somehow take this position, you would either be painfully foolhardy, Armond White, or both.

The Lost, Forgotten & Undersung Projects Of Joss Whedon

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • April 11, 2012 11:04 AM
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  • 8 Comments
Joss Whedon is about to have a very good week. The writer/director/producer has until recently, been best known for his work on television: he turned his poorly-received screenwriting debut "Buffy The Vampire Slayer" into one of the most beloved cult series of all times (which itself got a long-running spin-off, "Angel"), and followed them up with the short-lived but passionately followed sci-fi Western "Firefly," a show that lasted as single season, but managed to get its own cinematic sequel, "Serenity," which marked Whedon's big-screen directorial debut.

Who Should Direct 'Catching Fire'? 5 Directors We Think Could Do The Job

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 11, 2012 9:59 AM
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  • 20 Comments
So, writer-director Gary Ross, having helped make "The Hunger Games" into a gigantic hit, has decided to move on to new pastures. As we reported last week, Ross will be focusing on a new project, and after a few days, Lionsgate officially confirmed he will not be helming "Catching Fire," with both the studio and the director issuing formal statements.

On The Rise 2012: 5 Screenwriters To Keep An Eye On In The Next Few Years

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 10, 2012 11:59 AM
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  • 13 Comments
Unlike in theater or television, writers generally get the short end of the stick in the movie business. When a film doesn't work, the script is blamed, when it does work, the director gets credit. Writers get fired, rehired, fired again, rewritten and screwed out of credit. But that's not to say that once they get the momentum behind them, a screenwriter can't become just as talked about as actors, actresses and directors around Hollywood watering holes and meeting rooms.

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