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5 Things You May Not Know About The 'The Godfather Part II'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 9, 2012 1:00 PM
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  • 5 Comments
A sprawling three hour and twenty minute American epic crime film, what can you say about Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Godfather Part II” that hasn’t already been said? Nominated for 11 Academy Awards and winning six, including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Actor in a Supporting Role for Robert De Niro “The Godfather Part II” was met with tremendous critical acclaim with many critics claiming it had outdone its predecessor. Award- wise, it had. The original had also bagged 11 nominations, but only had won three.

The Films Of Sidney Lumet: A Retrospective

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 9, 2012 11:00 AM
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  • 13 Comments
Lumet was never fancy. He never needed to be, as a master of blocking, economic camera movements and framing that empowered the emotion and or exact punctuation of a particular scene. First and foremost, as you’ve likely heard ad nauseum -- but hell, it’s true -- Lumet was a storyteller, and one that preferred his beloved New York to soundstages (though let's not romanticize it too much, he did his fair share of work on studio film sets too as most TV journeyman and early studio filmmakers did).

5 Things You Might Not Know About 'The Conversation'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 9, 2012 10:09 AM
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  • 7 Comments
Two milestones hit for Francis Ford Coppola this weekend. The legendary filmmaker celebrated his 73rd birthday on Saturday, April 7th (happy belated, Francis) and, on the same day, observed the 38th anniversary of the opening of one of his most artistic efforts, 1974’s “The Conversation.”

The Films Of Whit Stillman: A Retrospective

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • April 6, 2012 12:04 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Famously dubbed the “the WASP Woody Allen” and the “Dickens of people with too much inner life” by reviewers and critics when his comedy-of-manners indie pictures arrived in the early 1990s, Whit Stillman’s ironic, clever and urbane examinations of upward and downward social mobility and the shallow concerns and preoccupations of the young, privileged and affluent won him a legion of adoring fans as soon as his first film premiered at Cannes. Evincing a polished sensibility through a send-up and celebration of the often ridiculous customs and etiquettes of upper-class social orders, Stillman is also a champion of the overlooked merits of conservative status quo conventions.

The Essentials: 6 Great Warren Oates Films

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • April 6, 2012 10:01 AM
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  • 15 Comments
Tuesday marked thirty years since the untimely passing of Warren Oates. The great, grizzled actor's work has fallen somewhat out of fashion these days -- few, bar perhaps Quentin Tarantino, name Sam Peckinpah or Monte Hellman, Oates' closest and most frequent collaborators, as influences. If you're familiar with him at all, it's likely from his parts as outlaw Lyle Gorch in "The Wild Bunch" or as Sgt. Hulka in Bill Murray comedy "Stripes." But for a time in the 1970s, Oates was Hollywood's go-to-badass, a man who everyone from Norman Jewison and William Friedkin to Steven Spielberg and Terrence Malick wanted to work with.

5 April DVD Titles You Should Know About, Including 'Chinatown,' 'A Trip To The Moon' & 'Girl On A Motorcycle'

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • April 4, 2012 2:05 PM
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  • 8 Comments
While the future of home entertainment may be rapidly moving towards a digital streaming-led future, we can't be the only movie nerds who still love owning a physical copy of something. Sure, Blu-Ray and DVD might be scratchable, easily lost and adorned by terrible box art, but there's something about the feeling of finding an undiscovered gem in the depths of a store, or getting a rarity in the post, that doesn't quite compare to clicking and watching something on Netflix.

King Of The World: The Films Of James Cameron

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 4, 2012 11:35 AM
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  • 19 Comments
James Cameron is, in case it has escaped your attention, the most successful filmmaker in history. The Canadian director hadn't exactly been starved for box-office smashes early in his career, but his last two films, "Titanic" and "Avatar," have taken nearly five billion dollars between them, the number one and two hits of all time. He's also the man behind the "Terminator" franchise, helmed one of the best-liked of the "Alien" series, has become a deep-sea explorer, and, uh, gave the world flying piranhas.

The 5 Best Heath Ledger Performances

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 4, 2012 10:15 AM
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  • 17 Comments
In an ideal world, Australian actor Heath Ledger would have been celebrating his thirty-third birthday today. Heartbreakingly, he isn't here for it: the actor passed away from an accidental prescription drugs overdose just over four years ago, on January 22, 2008. At the time, the actor was shooting Terry Gilliam's "The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus," and the director managed to finish the film with Johnny Depp, Colin Farrell and Jude Law paying tribute to the late actor by joining the production.

5 Things You Might Not Know About Woody Allen's Classic 'Annie Hall'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 3, 2012 10:00 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Despite fierce competition from sci-fi blockbuster "Star Wars" and fellow romantic comedy "The Goodbye Girl," Woody Allen's masterpiece "Annie Hall" walked away with Best Picture at the 50th Academy Awards, which were held on this day thirty-four years ago. Indeed, Allen's film nearly swept the board, despite only taking five nominations: Allen won Best Director and, alongside co-writer Marshall Brickman, Original Screenplay (although he lost Best Actor to Richard Dreyfuss), while Diane Keaton picked up Best Actress for the title role.

5 Summer Box-Office Head-To-Head Showdowns That Could Leave Blood On The Floor

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 2, 2012 12:19 PM
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  • 10 Comments
This past weekend, two pricey fantasy epics hit movie screens in the form of Warner Bros.' swords-and-sandal sequel "Wrath Of The Titans" and Relativity's comic fairy tale "Mirror Mirror." And while their audiences were, in theory, different (with Tarsem's Snow White picture skewing much younger), neither fared as well as hoped, "Wrath of the Titans" ending up with barely half of the original film's opening weekend, around $35 million, while "Mirror Mirror" failed to clear the $20 million mark, despite the presence of Julia Roberts.

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