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Interview: 'Afternoon Delight' Star Kathryn Hahn Talks Motherhood, Unhinged Silver Lake Book Clubs & Peter Bogdanovich's 'Squirrel To The Nuts'

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
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  • August 27, 2013 3:29 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Afternoon Delight
Even though her scenes in “Step Brothers,” “Anchorman,” and most recently “We're The Millers” rank among those films' finest and funniest moments, actress Kathryn Hahn had, until recently, never landed a proper starring vehicle to showcase her considerable chops. The occasion took another talented presence looking to branch out — “Six Feet Under” writer/producer Jill Soloway with her feature directorial debut, “Afternoon Delight” — to see Hahn not just in a comedic lead role, but one that presents her stunning dramatic range as well.

Interview: Terry Gilliam Talks 'The Zero Theorem,' Working With A Low Budget, Artistic Influences & More

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • August 27, 2013 12:01 PM
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The Zero Theorem Terry Gilliam
If anyone personifies taking lemons and making lemonade, it might just be director Terry Gilliam. The filmmaker is almost as known for the battles he's endured on various pictures than the movies themselves, but it speaks to his spirit and determination that he's created a singular and distinctive catalog of work. There are few moviemakers who could've not only made "Brazil," but turned out a masterpiece in an environment where the studio was actively working against the director (documented thoroughly in The Criterion Collection's excellent edition of the film). "Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas" is still the closest anyone has come to capturing Hunter S. Thompson's fever dream prose, while "Twelve Monkeys" endures to the point that SyFy is now ordering up a pilot for a TV show based on the movie (and no, Gilliam has not been contacted about it).

Interview: 'You're Next' Writer Simon Barrett & Director Adam Wingard On Sequel Ideas, Inspiration & The 'V/H/S' Franchise

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • August 26, 2013 2:56 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Way back in 2011, "You're Next" became the toast of the Toronto International Film Festival's Midnight Madness series, was the focus of a frenzied bidding war and then… the kind of eerie stillness that you might expect from one of the horror movies "You're Next" gleefully sends up. Now, almost two years after it originally debuted in Toronto, "You're Next" is now in theaters, just as audiences have regained their composure after "The Conjuring" scared them witless. We finally got to see the movie at the South by Southwest Film Festival earlier this spring (you can read our review here) and got to talk to writer Simon Barrett and director Adam Wingard, about what it was like having to wait all that time for their big horror movie to make its debut, whether or not they've planned subsequent "You're Next" sequels, their "V/H/S" franchise and what movies inspired this delightfully gory home invasion romp.

Interview: Wong Kar-Wai Talks Kung Fu, The Different 'The Grandmaster' Cuts & His Favorite Directors

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • August 22, 2013 3:22 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Wong Kar Wai, The Grandmaster
It's been six long years since a new Wong Kar-Wai movie graced cinema screens. The notoriously patient director behind "Chungking Express" and "In the Mood for Love" is back with "The Grandmaster," the biographical tale of Ip Man (also known as Yip Man), a true life historical figure (played in the film by the always brilliant Tony Leung) and martial arts wizard who would go on to train some kid called Bruce Lee. Harkening back to the director's earlier films, while adding a new level of expert technical precision, "The Grandmaster" is for any fan of kung fu or a devotee of Kar-Wai's work. It's in turns epic and gorgeous, a movie that demands to be seen, just for its visual opulence, and then discussed at length afterwards. We got a chance to do just that with Wong himself, who talked about the film's somewhat tortured production, why he decided to tell this story, what's different between this version and the international cut, what it was like working with Megan Ellison and who his favorite modern filmmakers are.

Interview: 'Sparrows Dance' Director Noah Buschel & Star Marin Ireland On Mumblecore, Low Budgets & More

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • August 21, 2013 6:04 PM
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This weekend, a movie that is very close to our hearts finally opens. "Sparrows Dance" is a micro-sized indie romantic comedy about a woman (played by Marin Ireland from "Homeland") who refuses to leave her apartment, which makes meeting someone something of a challenge. This changes when her toilet gets backed up and she has to hire a plumber (Paul Sparks from "Boardwalk Empire"). Love blossoms, of course, but as Poison taught us, every rose has its thorns, and this rose is super thorny. We saw the film before last year's Hamptons Film Festival and fell in love. It's just as quirky and fun and technically proficient as something like "Frances Ha," and it's finally seeing the light of day thanks to Tribeca Films.

Interview: Edgar Wright Talks 'The World's End,' Completing The Cornetto Trilogy, 'Ant-Man' & Much More

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • August 21, 2013 1:44 PM
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  • 2 Comments
All good things must come to an end, and this weekend, the "Three Flavors Cornetto Trilogy" finally melts with the debut of apocalyptic robo-comedy "The World's End." Beginning with 2004's romantic zombie comedy "Shaun of the Dead" and continuing with 2007's buddy comedy send-up "Hot Fuzz," the loose trilogy and the films within are wild, visually stunning homages to very specific genres, all of them directed by Edgar Wright and starring Simon Pegg and Nick Frost. (Pegg also co-wrote all three.) Wright, Pegg and Frost all return for "The World's End," which dramatizes what happens when several childhood friends return to their hometown to find things are different. Like really different (minor plot spoilers ahead).

Watch: Brie Larson & John Gallagher Jr. Talk 'Short Term 12,' Working With Kids, Upcoming Projects & More

  • By Edward Davis
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  • August 20, 2013 2:02 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Brie Larson, the 23-year-old actress known for roles in "The United States of Tara," "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World," and "21 Jump Street," is having a moment. In fact, she was crowned the unofficial "It Girl" of the 2013 SXSW Film Festival by us and many others. Why exactly? She had (count 'em) four films at the festival this week. They include the Sundance hits "The Spectacular Now" and Joseph Gordon Levitt's directorial debut, "Don Jon," her second co-directed short film, "Weighting" and lastly, "Short Term 12," the movie which won SXSW's coveted top Grand Jury prize this spring.

Watch: Joe Swanberg Talks "Breakthrough" Feature 'Drinking Buddies' Starring Olivia Wilde, Anna Kendrick & Jake Johnson

  • By Edward Davis
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  • August 20, 2013 12:00 PM
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Joe Swanberg, the indie director arguably responsible for the DIY aesthetic known as "mumblecore" (though don't fully blame him, he didn't coin the term) is the most prolific filmmaker alive. OK, maybe not quite, but since 2005, the filmmaker has made about 14 feature-length films. That's not quite an average of two films per year between 2005-2013, but it's close (and it doesn't even include the shorts he's made). His debut, "Kissing on the Mouth" kicked off this movement when it was heralded as a hit at SXSW and since then he's become known for micro-budgeted indies like "Hannah Takes The Stairs" (which helped launch Greta Gerwig's career), "Nights & Weekends" and "Alexander The Last."

Interview: 'Breaking Bad' Writer/Producer George Mastras Talks Wrapping Up The Series & Much More

  • By Cory Everett
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  • August 15, 2013 2:05 PM
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Now that "Breaking Bad" has entered the home stretch, we've been doing as much as anyone to celebrate the conclusion of the beloved series. Earlier this week, we sat down with writer/producer George Mastras, the man responsible for unforgettable episodes like "Crazy Handful of Nothin," "Grilled," "Mandala," "I.F.T.," "Thirty-Eight Snub" and "Dead Freight" (which he also directed) and the upcoming fourth-to-last episode, "To'hajiilee." (He also has co-writer credits on "Kafkaesque," "Hermanos," and "Crawl Space.") Brought on to the show in Season 1 by showrunner Vince Gilligan, Mastras—along with Peter Gould, Moira Walley-Beckett, Sam Catlin, Gennifer Hutchison and Tom Schnauz—became part of the core group that would plot the entire rise and fall of Walter White, successfully turning him from Mr. Chips to Scarface just as Gilligan had promised back in 2008.

Interview: 'Cutie And The Boxer' Director Zachary Heinzerling On Documentary Vs. Narrative, The Influence Of '70s New York City & More

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • August 14, 2013 1:05 PM
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This year has seen an unusually large amount of excellent documentaries make the scene, and one of the very best, "Cutie and the Boxer," opens this weekend (here's our review). It's the story of Ushio Shinohara and his wife Noriko, two New York artists who bicker with the best of them but who have maintained, in their 40-year marriage, a kind of harmony that few couples enjoy. Ushio is usually known for his giant papier-mâché motorcycles and large paintings made by putting on boxing gloves, dipping them in paint, and walloping the blank canvases. When Noriko, a fabulous artist in her own right, gets a section of the gallery devoted to a retrospective of his work (her artwork is turned into animated sequences in the movie), it is a perfect entre into the tumultuous dynamics that define their relationship.

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