Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

The Playlist

Watch: Brie Larson & John Gallagher Jr. Talk 'Short Term 12,' Working With Kids, Upcoming Projects & More

  • By Edward Davis
  • |
  • August 20, 2013 2:02 PM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
Brie Larson, the 23-year-old actress known for roles in "The United States of Tara," "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World," and "21 Jump Street," is having a moment. In fact, she was crowned the unofficial "It Girl" of the 2013 SXSW Film Festival by us and many others. Why exactly? She had (count 'em) four films at the festival this week. They include the Sundance hits "The Spectacular Now" and Joseph Gordon Levitt's directorial debut, "Don Jon," her second co-directed short film, "Weighting" and lastly, "Short Term 12," the movie which won SXSW's coveted top Grand Jury prize this spring.

Watch: Joe Swanberg Talks "Breakthrough" Feature 'Drinking Buddies' Starring Olivia Wilde, Anna Kendrick & Jake Johnson

  • By Edward Davis
  • |
  • August 20, 2013 12:00 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Joe Swanberg, the indie director arguably responsible for the DIY aesthetic known as "mumblecore" (though don't fully blame him, he didn't coin the term) is the most prolific filmmaker alive. OK, maybe not quite, but since 2005, the filmmaker has made about 14 feature-length films. That's not quite an average of two films per year between 2005-2013, but it's close (and it doesn't even include the shorts he's made). His debut, "Kissing on the Mouth" kicked off this movement when it was heralded as a hit at SXSW and since then he's become known for micro-budgeted indies like "Hannah Takes The Stairs" (which helped launch Greta Gerwig's career), "Nights & Weekends" and "Alexander The Last."

Interview: 'Breaking Bad' Writer/Producer George Mastras Talks Wrapping Up The Series & Much More

  • By Cory Everett
  • |
  • August 15, 2013 2:05 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Now that "Breaking Bad" has entered the home stretch, we've been doing as much as anyone to celebrate the conclusion of the beloved series. Earlier this week, we sat down with writer/producer George Mastras, the man responsible for unforgettable episodes like "Crazy Handful of Nothin," "Grilled," "Mandala," "I.F.T.," "Thirty-Eight Snub" and "Dead Freight" (which he also directed) and the upcoming fourth-to-last episode, "To'hajiilee." (He also has co-writer credits on "Kafkaesque," "Hermanos," and "Crawl Space.") Brought on to the show in Season 1 by showrunner Vince Gilligan, Mastras—along with Peter Gould, Moira Walley-Beckett, Sam Catlin, Gennifer Hutchison and Tom Schnauz—became part of the core group that would plot the entire rise and fall of Walter White, successfully turning him from Mr. Chips to Scarface just as Gilligan had promised back in 2008.

Interview: 'Cutie And The Boxer' Director Zachary Heinzerling On Documentary Vs. Narrative, The Influence Of '70s New York City & More

  • By Drew Taylor
  • |
  • August 14, 2013 1:05 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
This year has seen an unusually large amount of excellent documentaries make the scene, and one of the very best, "Cutie and the Boxer," opens this weekend (here's our review). It's the story of Ushio Shinohara and his wife Noriko, two New York artists who bicker with the best of them but who have maintained, in their 40-year marriage, a kind of harmony that few couples enjoy. Ushio is usually known for his giant papier-mâché motorcycles and large paintings made by putting on boxing gloves, dipping them in paint, and walloping the blank canvases. When Noriko, a fabulous artist in her own right, gets a section of the gallery devoted to a retrospective of his work (her artwork is turned into animated sequences in the movie), it is a perfect entre into the tumultuous dynamics that define their relationship.

Lee Daniels Talks The Ratings Struggles Of 'Lee Daniels' The Butler' And A Musical Remake Of 'Nights of Cabiria'

  • By Gabe Toro
  • |
  • August 13, 2013 4:00 PM
  • |
  • 4 Comments
Lee Daniels is used to a good fight. He had to fight perceptions of his first film, “Shadowboxer,” in order to make “Precious: Based On The Novel ‘Push’ By Sapphire.” He had to fight for the right to direct “The Paperboy,” a project that had switched hands amongst filmmakers as lauded as Pedro Almodovar. But nothing could have prepared him for the ratings fight that greeted him in regards to his new film, “Lee Daniels’ The Butler.”

Interview: Inside The 'Breaking Bad' Writers Room With Writer/Producer George Mastras

  • By Cory Everett
  • |
  • August 13, 2013 3:03 PM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
On Sunday, "Breaking Bad" returned for the first of its final 8 episodes. Anticipation for the premiere was at an all-time high, reviews were ecstatic (read ours here) and ratings were 5 times higher than when the series first debuted back in 2008. To celebrate the final curtain closing on this highly acclaimed series, the cast and crew have been taking a well deserved victory lap — a 90 minute Times Talks event, LACMA Live Read and Q&As at FilmLinc are just the tip of the iceberg — but before Heisenberg cooks up his last batch, we sat down with writer/producer George Mastras who was one of the first writers brought onboard by creator Vince Gilligan back in Season 1. In this age of showrunner-as-auteur, Gilligan is one of the few to loudly refute this view, crediting his team of writers (which includes Mastras, Peter Gould, Moira Walley-Beckett, Sam Catlin, Gennifer Hutchison and Tom Schnauz), as well as the cast and crew for making the show the success that it is.

Interview: David Gordon Green On The Free-Spirited 'Prince Avalanche,' Working With Nicolas Cage & 'Suspiria'

  • By Rodrigo Perez
  • |
  • August 9, 2013 1:30 PM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Filmmaker David Gordon Green has had a deeply eclectic career of omnivorous tastes thus far. To perhaps best demonstrate the polar extremes, the 37-year-old director (who has already made nine features) has had films produced by Terrence Malick ("Undertow") and Judd Apatow ("Pineapple Express"). His body of work thus far has covered intimate indie dramas featuring children ("George Washington"), broad comedies ("The Sitter"), adult dramas ("Snow Angels"), and high concept absurdist swords and sorcerer pictures ("Your Highness"). His oeuvre has run the gamut of styles, tones and genres.

'Magic Magic' Star Juno Temple Talks Losing Her Mind, The Polanski Influence, 'Sin City 2,' 'Maleficent' & More

  • By Drew Taylor
  • |
  • August 7, 2013 5:00 PM
  • |
  • 4 Comments
Earlier this year at Sundance, Chilean director Sebastian Silva ("The Maid") made a splash with two very different movies. The first, "The Crystal Fairy," was a trippy road comedy that starred Michael Cera and Gabby Hoffman and saw a limited theatrical release this summer from IFC Films (read our review here). The other Silva joint was an equally trippy but far darker film that also co-starred Michael Cera called "Magic Magic," which will be released on DVD this week from Sony. It stars Juno Temple as a young girl who descends into madness while visiting her sister abroad (it involves many sleepless nights, hypnotism, a memorable use of a Knife song and finally some kind of witchcraft). We got to talk to Temple about what it was like working with Silva, what her reference points were for the character, and asked about what she's got coming next—Robert Rodriguez's "Sin City: A Dame to Kill For," Alexandre Aja's "Horns," and Disney's "Sleeping Beauty" retelling "Maleficent" (where she plays a tiny fairy).

Interview: ‘In A World...’ Filmmaker Lake Bell Talks ‘Childrens Hospital’ As Directing Boot Camp, Shifting Role Of Kickstarter & More

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
  • |
  • August 5, 2013 11:00 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
In A World
In our interview with her at Sundance London back in May, Lake Bell explained that she'd always had the inclination to direct, but she was “steadfast on the path to being an actor." Now, a short year after helming a short film "Worst Enemy" and some episodes of "Childrens Hospital," the “It’s Complicated” and “How To Make It in America” actress’ feature debut "In A World" goes into theatrical release this week. The ensemble film — which won excellent reviews (us included) and the Best Screenplay award at Sundance — stars Bell as Carol, a voiceover artist looking to break into the Hollywood industry, who faces competition from her veteran voice star father (Fred Melamed) and his clique-minded male colleagues.

Interview: Mark Romanek Talks Jay Z's 'Picasso Baby' Short Film, Says "It's A Tsunami Of Joy"

  • By Drew Taylor
  • |
  • August 1, 2013 3:00 PM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
Tomorrow night, at 11 pm, Jay Z (the hyphen is gone!) will premiere his brand-new video for "Picasso Baby" on HBO, a highlight from his recently released Magna Carta Holy Grail album. It's an art installation-style 10-minute short film, in part based on Marina Abramovic's "The Artist in Present," an installation (and later, feature-length documentary) at New Year's Museum of Modern Art, in which the famous artist sat at a table for hours on end while everyday people would sit across from her and stare. For the Jay Z project, the rapper rented out a downtown Manhattan art gallery and invited people to perform the song too. So it was kind of like the Abramovic thing, except much more of a party. We got a chance to talk to Mark Romanek, the director of "One Hour Photo" and some of the most memorable music videos of the past two decades, who told us where the project came from, how he put it together, and why the music video format might be dead.

Email Updates

Recent Comments