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The Playlist

Harmony Korine Talks 'Spring Breakers', Narrative Freedom & Why The ATL Twins Make America Great

  • By Erik McClanahan
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  • March 20, 2013 2:05 PM
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  • 13 Comments
After opening in New York and Los Angeles last Friday, this weekend, U.S. audiences will get to see the latest fucked-up cinematic opus from enfant terrible Harmony Korine. "Spring Breakers," featuring James Franco alongside an unlikely young cast including Selena Gomez, Vanessa Hudgens and Ashley Benson, tells the story of four bored college coeds (the aforementioned three actresses plus Rachel Korine, the director's wife) who rob a restaurant to fund a booze-and-drug-fueled trip to Florida, only to fall in with Franco’s Alien, a rapper and gangster who loves spring break (calling it "the American dream") almost as much as he loves the four females leads, and their brazen acceptance of the criminal lifestyle.

Antoine Fuqua And The Cast Of 'Olympus Has Fallen' Discuss The Bumps & Bruises Of Action Filmmaking

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • March 20, 2013 10:58 AM
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  • 0 Comments
This weekend, Washington D.C. gets pulverized in “Olympus Has Fallen,” and director Antoine Fuqua wouldn’t have it any other way. The man in charge of this star-studded production boasted during press day of the glee he took in demolishing a national landmark, designed as a set in Shreveport, Louisiana. He looked forward every day to, “Tearing it up, shooting it up, making it real.”

Park Chan-wook Talks Differences Between Korean & American Films, How 'Stoker' Fits In With His Filmography & More

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • March 19, 2013 7:00 PM
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If there is one movie that has caused unending debate around The Playlist water-cooler, it's Park Chan-wook's English-language debut "Stoker." First screened at Sundance and making its slow creep across the country now, it's a twisty, unerringly perverse riff on Alfred Hitchcock's "Shadow of a Doubt," wherein a mysterious Uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode) comes to visit his long lost family following his brother's equally mysterious demise. Mia Wasikowska plays the young daughter of the deceased, and an admirably batty Nicole Kidman is the new widow. We got to sit down with director Park and discuss what made "Stoker" so appealing as his first English language movie, how he decided on the composers for the film, and where the film fits in with his filmography.

Saoirse Ronan's Irish Accent Will Be Heard For 'Grand Budapest Hotel,' Talks Ryan Gosling's "Stylized" 'How To Catch A Monster' & More

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
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  • March 18, 2013 10:59 AM
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  • 6 Comments
This month's tentpole adaptation, “The Host,” stands to bring Saoirse Ronan to a new level of exposure, but for fans of the actress looking beyond Stephenie Meyer's creation, there's plenty of promising projects soon to come: she's nabbed lead roles in both Wes Anderson's latest, “The Grand Budapest Hotel” and Ryan Gosling's directorial debut, “How To Catch A Monster.” Recently, we got the opportunity to chat with her about each of them, as well as her upcoming role in director Kevin Macdonald's latest effort "How I Live Now."

Interview: Eddie Pepitone Talks Deconstructionist Comedy, The Seven Stages to Accepting Yourself Onscreen, & Saying Yes To 'The Bitter Buddha'

  • By Katie Walsh
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  • March 17, 2013 8:32 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Eddie Pepitone is a comic’s comic, a deconstructionist stand-up comic with a scream like no other, who’s willing to put everyone, most often himself, under the microscope. Pepitone gets that treatment in the documentary film "The Bitter Buddha," directed by Steven Feinartz. It’s an engaging portrait of this man and an instant classic film about comedy that will be fascinating to comedy nerds and mainstream audiences alike. In our review, we said the film is 'a portrait of an interesting and endearing misanthrope,' and we got a chance to talk to the man himself on the day of his film’s premiere at the Cinema Village in New York City.

Video: Gillian Jacobs & Ken Marino On Why ‘Milo’ Is Just “Good Butt Fun”

  • By Kristin McCracken
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  • March 15, 2013 12:40 PM
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Unfortunately, when we talked to Ken Marino at SXSW earlier this week, the “Veronica Mars” Kickstarter campaign had not yet been announced, so there’s no word yet on whether Vinnie Van Lowe will return for the movie, already greenlit for this summer. What did we talk about? Marino’s gross-out monster movie – he describes it as “good butt fun” – which premiered in Austin this week.

Video: Steve Carell Talks 'Burt Wonderstone,' Trying To Identify With Jerk Characters & The Egos Of Show Business

  • By Edward Davis
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  • March 14, 2013 6:49 PM
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Last week we rolled out some of our interview with Steve Carell, the star of this weekend's upcoming magician comedy, "The Incredible Burt Wonderstone." Carell spoke to us about getting the band back together for "Anchorman 2" and his somewhat surprising dramatic turn as an eccentric millionaire schizophrenic for Bennett Miller's dark drama "Foxcatcher" coming later this year.

Video: Joe Swanberg Talks His "Breakthrough" Feature 'Drinking Buddies' Starring Olivia Wilde, Anna Kendrick & Jake Johnson

  • By Edward Davis
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  • March 14, 2013 6:27 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Joe Swanberg, the indie director arguably responsible for the DIY aesthetic known as "mumblecore" (though don't fully blame him, he didn't coin the term) is the most prolific filmmaker alive. OK, maybe not quite, but since 2005, the filmmaker has made about 14 feature-length films. That's not quite an average of two films per year between 2005-2013, but it's close (and it doesn't even include the shorts he's made). His debut, "Kissing on the Mouth" kicked off this movement when it was heralded as a hit at SXSW and since then he's become known for micro-budgeted indies like "Hannah Takes The Stairs" (which helped launch Greta Gerwig's career), "Nights & Weekends" and "Alexander The Last."

Video: Brie Larson Talks 'Short Term 12,' Her Upcoming Bollywood Musical, Being SXSW's "It Girl" & More

  • By Edward Davis
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  • March 14, 2013 5:00 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Brie Larson, the 23-year-old actress known for roles in "The United States of Tara," "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World," and "21 Jump Street" is having a moment. In fact, she's been crowned the unofficial "It Girl" of the 2013 SXSW Film Festival by us and many others. Why exactly? She had (count 'em) four films at the festival this week. They include the Sundance hits "The Spectacular Now" and Joseph Gordon Levitt's directorial debut, "Don Jon," her second co-directed short film, "The Arm" and lastly, "Short Term 12," the movie which won SXSW's coveted top Grand Jury prize this week.

Interview: Robin Wright On The Texas Hall Of Fame Awards, 'House of Cards,' The 'Dragon Tattoo' Sequel & Her Amazing Hair

  • March 7, 2013 6:28 PM
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  • 2 Comments
There are a lot of twists on the new David Fincher-produced Netflix series "House of Cards," which follows a devious, BBQ-loving congressman (Kevin Spacey) who looks to exact revenge upon the President of the United States after being instrumental in his election (and then passed over for a high profile cabinet position). But no one could have possibly imagined how wonderful Robin Wright, who plays Spacey's wife (in a role that oscillates between Martha Stewart, Hillary Clinton and Lady Macbeth), really is. She's sleek and sexy and absolutely lethal, but sympathetic and occasionally loving too. And the accomplishment hasn't gone unnoticed. The night before the South by Southwest Film Festival kicks off, Wright will be honored at the Texas Hall Of Fame Awards, which is put on by the Austin Film Society (Wright was born in Dallas). We got to talk to Wright about "House of Cards," the Texas Hall of Fame Awards, where the next "Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" is and, most importantly, her hair.

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