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The Playlist

New Clip From 'The Master'; Joaquin Phoenix Says Making 'I'm Still Here' Damaged His Career

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 9, 2012 10:49 PM
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  • 16 Comments
Don't call it a comeback, he's been here for years. Joaquin Phoenix has been appearing on screen for nearly three decades, initially under the name Leaf, but really came to attention in 1995 in Gus Van Sant's "To Die For," a film that really put him on the map. And across the next decade and a bit, in everything from blockbusters "Gladiator" and "Signs" to his hugely impressive collaborations with James Gray on "The Yards," "We Own The Night" and "Two Lovers," Phoenix steadily revealed himself as one of the most talented and committed actors of his generation.

TIFF Review: Robert Redford's 'The Company You Keep' Is An Unconvincing Bit Of Agitprop

  • By Simon Abrams
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  • September 9, 2012 8:43 PM
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  • 8 Comments
The third film in Robert Redford’s recent series of stillborn, bleeding heart dramas, "The Company You Keep" is a busy but inert civic-minded thriller. As a director, Redford has yet to break his recent habit of using hackneyed dialogue to talk down to his audience with Aaron Sorkin-esque dialogue that authoritatively spells out his talking points. But unlike "Lions for Lambs," an impressively incensed civics lesson that thinks it’s a drama, "The Company You Keep" is too cool of a film to be admired for its creator’s chutzpah alone. In fact, it’s probably the most frustrating of Redford’s recent films because it has a pseudo-contemplative atmosphere to it, one that superficially begs viewers to reflect upon how far they would go for their convictions. Political apathy is the real enemy in "The Company You Keep," making it pitiably ironic that Redford’s latest is as unmoving as it is.

The Wachowskis Finally Give Up Their Anonymity & Lana Addresses Her Sexual Transformation: 'Cloud Atlas' At TIFF

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • September 9, 2012 7:21 PM
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  • 1 Comment
“Cloud Atlas,” the sprawling and epic adaptation of David Mitchell’s celebrated, heady and dense novel, screened last night at the Toronto International Film Festival. An unorthodox arrangement, as it was directed by the Wachowski siblings, Larry and Lana, plus German filmmaker Tom Tykwer (“Run Lola Run”), at a cost of over $100 million, “Cloud Atlas” is the most expensive independent film ever made (i.e. outside of the studio system and from a triage of financiers).

Focus Features Go To 'The Place Beyond The Pines,' 'Great Expectations' And 'Jayne Mansfield's Car' Also Find Homes

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 9, 2012 2:32 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Several days into this year's Toronto International Film Festival, the buyers' market hasn't quite caught fire yet. A few films have been picked up, mostly on the smaller scale of things, but the first few days have mostly been made up of films that already have distribution – the "Cloud Atlas"es, "Silver Linings Playbook"s and "Anna Karenina"s of the world. But in the next few days, the real hot tickets start to unspool, and the first major acquisition of the festival has been made.

20 New Images From The 'The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey,' Including First Look At Lee Pace As Legolas' Dad

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 9, 2012 11:04 AM
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  • 6 Comments
We imagine one of the buzz words in movie marketing departments these days, along with 'Pinterest' and 'viral games' is 'app.' Barely any major movie hits theaters without some kind of iOS-related promotional tie-in, often in the form of a game, or something similar. Some are genuinely nifty (the Hans Zimmer one for "Inception" was pretty great), most are a bit half-hearted, but few are particularly revelatory about the movie themselves.

TIFF Review: ‘Tabu’ Is Magic Realism In Rapture, As Only The Language Of Cinema Can Tell It

  • By Nikola Grozdanovic
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  • September 9, 2012 10:00 AM
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  • 2 Comments
It’s been known that a singular moment during a brilliant film can make you realize you’re watching something special, something that will be deposited into your memory bank with a very high interest rate. In Miguel Gomes’ third feature film, "Tabu," this moment comes while you’re still getting comfortable in your seat. A film-within-a-film begins proceedings, in which we are introduced to an ‘intrepid explorer’ who, heartbroken over the one he lost, commits suicide and gets eaten by a crocodile. Then something strange happens, the narrator says: this crocodile adopts the melancholic state of the explorer and, as the film comes to a close, spends his time with the ghost of the explorer’s lost ladyfriend. Welcome to movie magic.

“I Don’t Consider That We’re Dealing With A Cult” - Paul Thomas Anderson Talks About 'The Master' At TIFF

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • September 9, 2012 9:00 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Paul Thomas Anderson’s “The Master” may have already thrilled lucky American audiences at sneak peak pop-up screenings all over the country and in Venice – where it won two of the three major awards including Best Director – but the hypnotic, opaque and much-discussed drama is still the talk of the Toronto International Film Festival.

TIFF Review: Chest-Beating LAPD Cop Drama 'End Of Watch' Is Clichéd & Monotonous

  • By Simon Abrams
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  • September 8, 2012 10:46 PM
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  • 5 Comments
Like "Harsh Times" before it, police drama "End of Watch" conflates realism with sensationalism. In fact, writer/director David Ayer sustains an abrasive tone throughout "End of Watch" in a number of ways. Firstly, Ayer gives his buddy cop drama a cheap kind of immediacy by having his macho, Alpha male Los Angeles cop protagonists film their lives as police officers. Button-sized cameras and hand-held digital cameras aren’t however just used by the police: both the local Mexican drug cartel members and the black gang-bangers that the 13th district cops have to keep an eye out for use cameras to document and valorize their activities too.

First Look At Jessica Chastain & Nikolaj Coster-Waldau In Horror 'Mama'

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
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  • September 8, 2012 6:15 PM
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  • 4 Comments
If short filmmakers have a best case scenario in their minds when they set out to make something, then director Andres Muschietti may have just achieved it. After premiering his short film, “Mama,” to near-unanimous praise during festivals the past few years, the young filmmaker was chosen by Guillermo del Toro to develop the film into a feature, and soon after actress Jessica Chastain came aboard as well. Essentially reward upon reward for Muschietti, and we now get a nice glimpse ourselves as the first still from the project has hit the net.

Tom Wilkinson To Investigate A 'Felony,' David Thewlis Joins 'Red 2,' 'Artist' Director Michel Hazavanicius Takes Acting Role

  • By Benjamin Wright
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  • September 8, 2012 5:48 PM
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  • 0 Comments
As in demand as he is right now, something that Kathryn Bigelow's "Zero Dark Thirty" is only going to cement, Joel Edgerton seems intent on marching to the beat of his own drum. So for his next film, rather than taking the Hollywood dime, he's working on thriller "Felony," based on his own script, and according to a press release, he's just got a great co-star, in the shape of Oscar-nominee Tom Wilkinson. In the Matthew Saville-directed project, Edgerton who plays a cop who accidentally hits a child in his car, only to lie about the accident, while Wilkinson plays the lead investigator of the incident. Sounds promising, although we're curious to see whether this turns out to be set in Australia, or in the U.S.

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