Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

The Playlist

Tribeca Review: A Drug Trafficking Romeo And Juliet Face The Tragedy Of 'Deep Powder'

  • By Gabe Toro
  • |
  • April 21, 2013 10:48 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
It doesn’t get much more Romeo and Juliet than “Deep Powder,” a drug melodrama based on true events but otherwise inspired by a love driven by classic class conflict. The handsome, broke townie in this instance is “Evil Dead” star (deal with it) Shiloh Fernandez as Danny, a puppy dog-cute snow-lift operator. He’s got eyes for kewpie-doll rich girl Natasha (Haley Bennett), who informs her that she accidentally dropped her wallet on the lift, but that she had no pressing need for him to give it back. The shock is that the wallet has four hundred dollars that she presumably won’t miss, which is even more incredible considering this was the early '80s, and inflation translates that to roughly $6,056.55. Roughly. Check the math.

Tribeca Review: Silence On The Front Lines Of War, In 'The Kill Team'

  • By Gabe Toro
  • |
  • April 21, 2013 10:03 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
The Kill Team
There's a stomach-turning sadness at the heart of "The Kill Team," Dan Krauss' austere documentary about a soldier trapped in the cycle of violence perpetrated by a group of soldiers indicted on charges of violence against innocents in 2010. While the media was more than ready to discuss a culture of violence, utilizing "Kill Team" as a fashionable headline-filler, Krauss' film places the spotlight on Pvt. Adam Winfield. Like the upcoming "We Steal Secrets: The Story Of WikiLeaks," which places a strong focus on walking security breach Bradley Manning as a square peg, "The Kill Team" paints a portrait of Winfield as an overly earnest young fellow far out of his league when paired with soldiers that, when armed, simply became Boys With Guns.

Tribeca Review: 'Lenny Cooke' Is The 'Death Of A Salesman' Of Sports Documentaries

  • By Gabe Toro
  • |
  • April 20, 2013 10:18 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
Early on in failed-prodigy documentary "Lenny Cooke," the titular basketball star, then in high school, is caught off-guard in one of the film's many revealing passages. He is discussing the 2001 NBA Draft, which made history with three high schoolers taken in the top four selections. Before the draft, Cooke is casually asked who will be selected first overall. He off-handedly mentions three distinct possibilities: Seton Hall freshman Eddie Griffin, high school center Eddy Curry and the eventual number one pick, Kwame Brown.

Tribeca Review: 'Dark Touch' Matches Pitch Black Subject Matter To Fangoria-Style Visuals

  • By Gabe Toro
  • |
  • April 19, 2013 6:15 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Director Marina De Van has had a curious career, emerging from the shadows of collaborator Francois Ozon. Her first two films were strongly indebted to a culture of Gaellic body horror that plumbed greater depths than the more commercial sadism expressed in films like "Martyrs" and "Inside," with her starring role in "In My Skin" providing stomach-turning sights as well as insightfully mapping the sadness of a person alone in her own suffering, addicted to self-mutilation. A similar prison awaited Sophie Marceau in "Don't Look Back" as she found herself morphing into Monica Bellucci, a fantasy conceit with very real consequences. In some ways, her latest film "Dark Touch" pulls back considerably, tackling a more commercial story of a telekinetic young girl. But in others, De Van is right at home exploring the disturbed side of an identity conflict, and the way our physical experiences shape us as human beings.

Review: 'Oconomowoc' Is More Coming-Of-College-Age Quirk You've Seen Before

  • By Gabe Toro
  • |
  • April 19, 2013 4:34 PM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
Bust out your bemused deadpan, it’s time for “Oconomowoc!” This excessively low-temperature film is yet another example of an indie film wanting to have its cake and eat it too: an arch, knowing approximation of indie aesthetics that both mocks and embraces its forebearers in a way that pretends there’s a difference between having a laugh at the post-Jared Hess school of no-budget cringe comedy and actually being a part of it. The mistake here is having cinematic inspirations that don’t travel too far: Hess’ work often feels like a bizarre conflagration of Godard, Herzog and John Waters. By contrast, “Oconomowoc” seems like a cartoon pilot that IFC doesn’t pick up, only to be turned into a film.
More: Review

Tribeca Review: 'Six Acts' Delves Into The Darkness Of Casual Sex

  • By Gabe Toro
  • |
  • April 19, 2013 3:17 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
There aren't a whole lot of words to describe that feeling of intimacy where everyone knows each other in the, ah, Biblical sense, but the feelings are not necessarily all-around mutual. Such sentiment pollutes the lives of characters at the heart of "Six Acts," a powerful Israeli film that follows that conflict as it weighs down one girl with a deadly combination of Mediterranean beauty and middling self-esteem.

Tribeca Review: 'Adult World' Spins A Quirky Comedy That Doesn't Quite Come Together

  • By Gabe Toro
  • |
  • April 19, 2013 1:22 PM
  • |
  • 7 Comments
The very first scene of "Adult World" should immediately set off warning bells. It's a glimpse of heroine Amy (Emma Roberts) as she contemplates suicide in much the same way someone goes about stacking bills; without weight, as if it's something of an eternal hassle. Except her worried countenance and the Sylvia Plath poster on the wall suggests she's being serious, and that this is supposed to be mildly funny that someone is sweating the details of suicide, even though this character already looks as if she's not taking this seriously. It's a confused way to introduce the audience to a character, as both suicidal and half-hearted.

Tribeca Review: 'Floating Skyscrapers' Never Dodges The Inevitability Of The Modern Gay Indie Film Tragedy

  • By Gabe Toro
  • |
  • April 19, 2013 12:59 PM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
Ideally there’d be a way around this, but it appears there is not: if you’re a gay couple in an independent film, things aren’t going to end well for you. The cloud of disaster hangs low over “Floating Skyscrapers,” a Polish drama about two male lovers that begins with the conspicuous, unseen activity of consensual male sexual activity behind bathroom doors as if it was a big, honking warning: walk into this film, and you’re going to see and feel it all; if it wasn’t so upsetting, we wouldn’t be hiding it right now.

Tribeca Review: ‘Almost Christmas’ Is A Mostly Joyless Misfire

  • By Rodrigo Perez
  • |
  • April 19, 2013 10:41 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Paul Rudd,Paul Giamatti, Almost Christmas
Director Phil Morrison hasn't made a film since his exceptional debut indie, "Junebug," which launched Amy Adams in 2005. Brimming with life, even without the Oscar-nominated and very-worthy firecracker Adams performance, the movie is flush with an idiosyncratic humanity and especially complex and uniquely written characters. However, his long belated follow-up, "Almost Christmas,” arriving some eight years after his auspicious beginning possesses little traces of the spark that made "Junebug" so special.

Tribeca Review: ‘Bluebird’ Is A Well-Observed & Striking Debut About Family, Connectedness & Consequences

  • By Rodrigo Perez
  • |
  • April 19, 2013 9:59 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Bluebird, John Slattery, Emily Meade
Subtle, nuanced and absorbing, Lance Edmands’ directorial debut “Bluebird” is a remarkable first feature and wise beyond his and its years. Carefully shot, well-observed and featuring terrific performances from an excellent slate of experienced, yet largely unknown actors (aside from the “Mad Men” and HBO stars), “Bluebird” is an affecting and moving examination of family, mothers, connectedness and the ripple effect of tragic consequences.

Email Updates

Recent Comments