The Playlist

Tribeca Review: '2 Days In New York' A Funny & Welcome Sequel Worthy Of Its Predecessor

  • By John Lichman
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  • April 25, 2012 3:00 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Taking place a few years after “2 Days in Paris,” with the events from that film summed up in a puppet show, Jack (played Adam Goldberg) is gone and Marion (Delpy) lives in New York with her boyfriend Mingus (Chris Rock) and their respective children from previous relationships. Both lead artistic New York lives as Marion is about to open a photo exhibit and Mingus is writing for the Village Voice along with hosting two radio shows. Marion's father Jeannot (Albert Delpy) and sister Rose (Alexia Landeau) are coming to New York to spend time as a family following the death of Marion's mother. The promise of foreign customs and crazy old men is fulfilled the second we meet Dad, locked in customs and removing the sausages he strapped to his chest.

Tribeca Review: Humor & Heartbreak Mix Unevenly In the Slight ‘Lola Versus’

  • By The Playlist
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  • April 25, 2012 2:02 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Employing a hybrid of smart and quippy comedic observations, a perceptive outlook on the complications of 20/30-something relationships in New York and genuine moments of romantic heartache, the romantic comedy “Lola Versus” can’t seem to synthesize these elements into a fully satisfying experience by the end of its brief 89 minute running time.

Review: 'Sound Of My Voice' A Sparse, Sturdy Debut By Zal Batmanglij With A Star Turn By Brit Marling

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 25, 2012 1:00 PM
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  • 0 Comments
A sterile basement, untouched by tainted hands. A small coalition of the willing, clean, bright-eyed and brimming with a mixture of fear and optimism. A beautiful woman with a secret, clad in white, attached to a breathing apparatus, telling an outlandish story. Like the listeners, you hang on to every word, you cling to every hidden meaning. This is the world of “Sound of My Voice.”

Tribeca Review: 'Babygirl' A Slight Diversion About A Girl's Coming-Of-Age

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 24, 2012 7:32 PM
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  • 0 Comments
It's a surprise that "Babygirl" director Macdara Vallely hails from Ireland. His new film, premiering at The Tribeca Film Festival, hums and buzzes with the authentic regional pleasures of the Bronx, the dialects, the smoky bodegas, the sizzling summer pavement. "Babygirl," which follows the struggles of a small Puerto Rican family, certainly passes the smell test to this particular critic, capturing the neighborhood's particular charms and unmistakable ethnic identity.

Review: 'Strange Fruit' A Solid, Fascinating Look At The Groundbreaking Failure Of The Beatles' Apple Records

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 24, 2012 6:05 PM
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  • 1 Comment
While Radiohead weren't the first band to break free of the coporate machine, and drop an album on their own terms, they were easily the most promiment. And while this was par for the course for underground artists and bands through the '80s and '90s who thrived within a specific independent framework (that was arguably co-opted by the mainstream post-Nirvana, but that's another discussion), but the release of In Rainbows opened the eyes of acts of similar stature, that they didn't need to rely on the expensive machinations, and iron clad contracts of a major record label to survive. And in fact, they could sell less records and earn more money to striking it on their own. Now, if a band isn't founding their own label, they at setting vanity shingles under corporate umbrellas at the very least, and taking a stronger say in how they conduct their careers. But all this might not have been possible were it not for The Beatles.
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Tribeca Review: 'Replicas' Sadly Seems More Interested In Cheap Thrills Than The Haneke-Level Chills It Promises

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 24, 2012 5:21 PM
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  • 0 Comments
The Hughes family is one just barely clinging to hope after a terrible tragedy. Following the loss of their daughter, Mark (Josh Close), Mary (Selma Blair) and their preteen son Brandon attempt to heal together at their upstate vacation home, the air thick with tension. Mark has been working so hard that by the time he’s taken a break in the wake of their loss, Mary doesn’t even recognize him. And yet, they’re the ideal candidates for suffering in the moody, disquieting “Replicas.”

Tribeca Review: 'Nancy, Please' Showcases The Worst Nightmare Of The Timid Grad Student

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 24, 2012 4:25 PM
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  • 1 Comment
We've all known people like Nancy. The title character of Andrew Semans' "Nancy, Please" is a real pill, dark eyes, slumped shoulders, and an eternal pout. There's always drama in Nancy's life, and she's always expressing it physically. She's always impetuous, always difficult, and frequently nasty, as if lashing out not against a single person but the world at large. In spite of it all, her punk sneer and angular sensuality is also sharp like a knife, tight like a fist. And for young potential PhD Paul, she is an out-and-out boogeyman.

Tribeca Review: 'Searching For Sugar Man' An Entertaining, Touching & Revealing Look At Forgotten Pop Singer Rodriguez

  • By Todd Gilchrist
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  • April 24, 2012 12:59 PM
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  • 1 Comment
If every Sundance film festival needs at least one documentary to remind white people of all the great music in the world they don’t know about, at least “Searching For Sugar Man” seems like 2012’s front-runner for the best one. A born crowd-pleaser whose central mystery begets a great triumph of grace and modesty, Malik Bendjelloul’s documentary about forgotten-before-he-was-known folk-pop singer Rodriguez is a hugely entertaining, emotionally touching, and musically revelatory experience.

Tribeca Review: Keanu Reeves Doc 'Side By Side' A Treat For Cinephiles On All Sides Of The Digital Debate

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • April 24, 2012 11:39 AM
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  • 6 Comments
Doing an impressive job of tracing the evolution of filmmaking technology (not just the cameras but the editing, post-production, distribution, exhibition, even the archiving aspects of it) from 1895 to the present day, “Side by Side” is an old school talking-head documentary on the subject of digital filmmaking vs. photochemical filmmaking. It sounds pretty dull as a logline, but stacked with gossipy, informal anecdotes and opinions from many of the most respected directors, cinematographers, editors, execs, VFX artists and digital wizards in the industry, it proves instead to be highly entertaining and informative, and by its close has presented a thoroughly diverting overview of the debate. Then again, we are massive geeks about this sort of thing.

Review: Twisty, Action-Packed NYC Noir 'Safe' Is The Finest Jason Statham Actioner Yet

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 24, 2012 10:59 AM
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  • 9 Comments
The de-evolution of the modern b-action movie is disheartening. The genre has been bisected by traditionalists and new-school practitioners. The old-school, red meat types like Sylvester Stallone and their ilk believe that real men doing real stunts and delivering brutal blows is the way to go, big tough guys in big tough situations, without any youngbloods or fancy gizmos. The more contemporary action filmmaker, however, spikes the punch, utilizing heavy-duty CGI to turn Tobey Maguire into Dolph Lundgren, Cameron Diaz into Jackie Chan. Neither side seems to understand that you don't need to be Dostoyevsky to infuse the same old tropes with just a little respect for characters, stories, suspense, and high stakes. It's the story, stupid. Believe in it.

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