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Review: Ben Wheatley's Dark, Gory & Profane 'A Field In England'

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • February 6, 2014 5:19 PM
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  • 0 Comments
A Field In England
Imagine attempting a super-low-budget, rapidly shot mashup of the melancholic aesthetic of Ingmar Bergman, the comedic sensibility of Mel Brooks and the tonal uneasiness of Lars Von Trier -- you'd probably end up with a complete mess of a film. However, that's not the case for Ben Wheatley, whose willfully abstruse "A Field in England" more or less fits that bill (by way of Samuel Beckett, "The Wicker Man" and Sergio Leone, if you want to fine tune the comparison, but we could probably continue throwing names at it all day and finding most of them stick) and comes out as a totally unique, often brilliant, deliberate partial mess instead. Reteaming the director, who, off the back of his feature triptych of "Down Terrace," "Kill List" and "Sightseers" has become something of an indie phenomenon, with regular writer Amy Jump, the film is the most formally experimental, and probably the least approachable, of the director's titles to date. But it's further proof of Wheatley's singular sensibilities as a filmmaker: the film's dark comedy, occasional gory violence and constant profanity are immediately recognizable as hallmarks, even as the black and white cinematography (often very beautiful), period setting and parable-like feel sees him move into new, uncharted territory.

Ben Wheatley Directing First Two Episodes Of 'Doctor Who' Season 8, Catherine Hardwicke Goes MTV & More

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • October 14, 2013 9:07 AM
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  • 0 Comments
It looks like the BBC is giving "Doctor Who" fans lots of reasons to look forward to season eight. First, after runs by two fan favorites in Matt Smith and David Tennant, Peter Capaldi will be the next actor to roll with the TARDIS in the beloved show. And to get things off on on the right foot, one of the best genre filmmakers of the moment has been hired as well.

5 Films Of Horror & Madness To Watch If You Love 'The Wicker Man'

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • September 24, 2013 3:16 PM
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  • 8 Comments
5 Films To See Before 'The Wicker Man'
No, not the bees. The beloved, now unassailably classic original “The Wicker Man” turns 40 this year, and this week a version dubbed ‘The Final Cut’ makes its way to theaters, with director Robin Hardy’s blessing. If it were any other four-decade-old British horror film getting the same treatment, it would likely be the first chance many of us would have had to see it on the big screen. But “The Wicker Man” has grown in critical esteem and public adoration since its scrappy, perfunctory first run, which means that in recent years its various cuts have been staples on the late-night-horror/Halloween/Midnight Madness circuit. Not that that necessarily makes us less likely to go see this version—as is almost a requisite for a truly cult film, “The Wicker Man” does not just stand up to, it pretty much demands repeated viewing, and yields some new level of WTF delight every time. And with cinematography this evocative and of-its-time and an ending this epic, the bigger the screen, the better.

Ben Wheatley To Direct Adaptation Of J.G. Ballard’s 'High Rise'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • August 29, 2013 9:21 AM
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  • 2 Comments
To say that Ben Wheatley likes to have options would be an understatement. The prolific director has already dropped one movie this year (the trippy "A Field In England," with Drafthouse Films handling the U.S. release) along with his first music video, and currently sitting in pile on desk of potential/developing projects are: "Freakshift," "I, Macrobane," "Two For Hell" and the animated "Mega Evil Motherfuckers." And while Wheatley has thus far mostly pursued movies that stem from his own brain, he's making an exception for this next one.

Watch: Ben Wheatley Directed Music Video For Editors' “Formaldehyde”

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • August 8, 2013 3:05 PM
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  • 0 Comments
While many filmmakers (think Mark Romanek or David Fincher among others) got their start doing music videos, "Kill List" and "Sightseers" helmer Ben Wheatley has cut his own freaky, unique path. “A lot of directors come up through making pop promos: I didn’t,” Wheatley told Creative Review. “My route in was through advertising, internet and television." But it seems all you had to do was ask. And British band Editors did just that and the result is the director's first music video ever.

Spend 30 Minutes Diving Into The Making Of Ben Wheatley's 'A Field In England' With New Featurettes

  • By Ben Brock
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  • July 9, 2013 10:45 AM
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  • 0 Comments
"A Field In England" (review here), the mind-bending, low-budget English Civil War psychedelic horror film from Ben Wheatley (“Kill List,” “Sightseers”) has rapidly become one of those films that is much bigger than just what's on the screen. First, attention focused on the unconventional multi-platform release, which saw it come out in cinemas at the same time as on various forms of home media. Now, the film's penumbra has expanded with the jaw-dropping “Masterclass” section of its website.

Karlovy Vary Review: Ben Wheatley's 'A Field In England'

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • July 4, 2013 3:46 PM
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  • 15 Comments
A Field In England
Imagine attempting a super-low-budget, rapidly shot mashup of the melancholic aesthetic of Ingmar Bergman, the comedic sensibility of Mel Brooks and the tonal uneasiness of Lars Von Trier -- you'd probably end up with a complete mess of a film. However, that's not the case for Ben Wheatley, whose willfully abstruse "A Field in England" more or less fits that bill (by way of Samuel Beckett, "The Wicker Man" and Sergio Leone, if you want to fine tune the comparison, but we could probably continue throwing names at it all day and finding most of them stick) and comes out as a totally unique, often brilliant, deliberate partial mess instead. Reteaming the director, who, off the back of his feature triptych of "Down Terrace," "Kill List" and "Sightseers" has become something of an indie phenomenon, with regular writer Amy Jump, the film is the most formally experimental, and probably the least approachable, of the director's titles to date. But it's further proof of Wheatley's singular sensibilities as a filmmaker: the film's dark comedy, occasional gory violence and constant profanity are immediately recognizable as hallmarks, even as the black and white cinematography (often very beautiful), period setting and parable-like feel sees him move into new, uncharted territory.

Watch: Trippy Teaser Trailer & TV Spot For Ben Wheatley's 'A Field In England'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 24, 2013 11:37 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Ben Wheatley has taken viewers down dark paths with "Kill List," on blackly comic road trips with "Sightseers" and into a crime family trying to keep it together with "Down Terrace," but perhaps nothing can prepare us for "A Field In England." And these this new teaser trailer and TV spot reveal that if anything, it's going to be a experience probably unlike many other things you'll see this summer.

Watch: New Trailer & Poster Arrive For Ben Wheatley's Trippy 'A Field In England'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 21, 2013 8:59 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Many, including ourselves, tipped the latest film from Ben Wheatley, "A Field In England," to pop up somewhere in the Cannes line-up. After all, his reputation's been growing since his first two pictures "Down Terrace" and "Kill List," and "Sightseers" was on the Croisette last year. The film didn't appear in the line-up, but in a way, it didn't need to, because it already has its own plans; rolling out back in the UK in an unprecedented multi-format release that will see it hit cinemas on the same day that it's released on DVD & Blu-Ray, airs on VOD, and even screens on the free Film4 channel.

5 Reasons Why You Must See The Hilariously Dark & Twisted 'Sightseers'

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • May 10, 2013 2:45 PM
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  • 0 Comments
5 Reasons: 'Sightseers'
Caravanning into theaters this weekend in limited release is Ben Wheatley's "Sightseers." It’s easily one of the best films of the year so far and perhaps more importantly one of the most enjoyable. Our review of the film from Cannes last year affectionately dubbed it "Natural Born Campers," and that's pretty apt. A pitch-black road-trip comedy (or at least that's one of many ways to describe it), "Sightseers" centers on Chris and Tina, two misfit lovers taking a sightseeing trip through rural England, but during their voyage, Chris (Steve Oram) starts to show his psychopathic true colors once he crosses paths (and becomes incensed) with society’s various annoying boobs: the careless litterer, the obnoxiously loud party girls, the pedantic asshole, etc.

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