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The Playlist

TIFF Trailer: Christian Petzold's 'Phoenix' Starring Nina Hoss

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • August 18, 2014 12:47 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Christian Petzold Phoenix
If you've been paying attention to world cinema at all, Christian Petzold is likely a name known to you. The filmmaker broke out in a big way with his 2008 feature "Jerichow," and his powerful 2012 effort "Barbara" only cemented his reputation. Now the director is back with "Phoenix," and the first trailer has arrived.

Hal Hartley To Close Off 'Henry Fool' Trilogy With 'Ned Rifle,' Louis Leterrier Reteaming With Luc Besson For 'Sea At War'

  • By Ken Guidry
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  • May 16, 2013 12:40 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Hal Hartley’s recent work hasn’t been as high profile as his films back in the ‘90s, but it looks like the director is back in action yet again, with a continuation of one of his best known pictures. This time, the project is “Ned Rifle,” which is a follow-up to his previous films “Henry Fool” and “Fay Grim.” Parker Posey, Liam Aiken, and Thomas J. Ryan are all returning to reprise their characters, starring alongside Gemma Arterton. Production on the film is slated to begin later this year with Fortissimo Films taking on sales rights in Cannes.

'Barbara' Director Christian Petzold Talks The Influence Of 'Klute' & Reveals What He Plans To Do Next

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • December 17, 2012 10:02 AM
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  • 0 Comments
When the wall came down, German filmmakers found themselves ushered into two clusters: those that concentrated on the country’s fascist past and the others that shined light on anything else. The latter clique was hailed as pushing the medium forward; they often dabbled in social-realism with little dialogue and snail-like pacing -- and though their box office receipts were low in comparison to their brother faction, they seduced international audiences and held their ground at many of the world’s foremost film festivals. As the first and second generation of directors emerging after the split, the media dubbed their movement the “Berlin School” (a moniker they’re not thrilled over) and the team pressed on making films, a trio of them even coming together to shoot a “Red Riding”-esque trilogy in “Dreileben.”

NYFF Review: 'Barbara' A Fresh Look Into 1980s Germany, Focusing On Life & Love

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • October 1, 2012 12:58 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Though maybe a bit too stiff and straight-laced, "Barbara" is a frequently subtle, moderately interesting character study set in a grievous East Germany during the 1980s. What are especially nice are the painstaking ways that director Christian Petzold ("Jerichow," "Dreileben: Beats Being Dead") avoids obvious nods to the time period -- forget drenching the film in some kind of filter as a signifier (a la the once-abused-now-Instagram-friendly sepiatone), the filmmaker even refuses simple explanatory title cards and instead dresses the environment appropriately, offering hints of the current year in the background set pieces and radio programs. This kind of understated nature runs the entire feature; in fact, one of the most intriguing aspects of "Barbara" is the lack of narrative hand-holding, with the lead's main intent remaining a mystery for a good chunk of the movie. There are no twists to spoil, but admittedly, much of the film's pull anchors on its masterful use of low-key storytelling -- take a gander at the next paragraph at your own risk.

NYFF '11 Review: 'Dreileben' Is An Accomplished, Dense Trilogy Spanning Murder, Love & More

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • October 1, 2011 3:20 AM
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  • 4 Comments
With the recent upsurge in quality TV programming and the ensuing embracement by cinema-goers, it was only a matter of time before film festivals actually started programming pieces originally made for the tube. Both "Carlos" and "The Red Riding Trilogy" were of this ilk; flicks broadcast on the small-screen that retained their cinematic quality but took advantage of the long-form storytelling television provided. "Dreileben," the latest of these undertakings, centers on a murder across three feature films each with their own perspective. Things open innocently with a youthful romance, the loose murderer and subsequent manhunt only lurking in the background. Out of sight, out of mind -- but it only lasts for so long. The second feature involves an out-of-towner psychologist helping with the investigation and the third follows the "villain" himself. Much like 'Red Riding,' this triptych is helmed by different directors: Christian Petzold ("Jerichow"), Dominik Graf ("A Map of the Heart"), and critic Christoph Hochhäusler ("The City Below"), each of them part of the "Berlin School" clique in contemporary German cinema.

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