The Playlist

For Your Consideration: 10 Overlooked Actresses Who Deserve Some Awards Season Attention

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • December 4, 2013 3:05 PM
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  • 11 Comments
Received wisdom says that most years, including this one, the Best Actress field of contenders for the Oscars is "weaker" than their male counterparts, with a fairly limited group of possibilities who are plausible nominees. To which we can only say: horseshit. Every year, but this one in particular, we watch scores of fine female performances be overlooked because they're in small indie movies or because they were overshadowed in reviews by male co-stars or because they're not Meryl Streep.

Mia Hansen-Love Helming Dance World Saga 'Eden' Starring Brady Corbet and Greta Gerwig

  • By Ben Brock
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  • September 4, 2013 12:15 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Seemingly every generation's zeitgeist-capturing musical movement has its correlating cinematic interpretation (usually about an arty director with some experience in said movement). Whit Stillman's “The Last Days of Disco” attempted to be that film for the early '80s and the waning days of the '70s musical fad of choice; Michael Winterbottom's “24 Hour Party People” captured the Factory records heyday of the late '80s; and now, behold, Mia Hansen-Love is bringing us "Eden," a chronicle of the electronic music boom of the '90s.

5 Reasons You Should Go See Noah Baumbach & Greta Gerwig's 'Frances Ha,' Plus All The Music In The Film

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 31, 2013 11:22 AM
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  • 14 Comments
Frances, Ha feature
It's been out for a few weeks, and has been doing very nicely in limited release (with the third-best screen average of the year so far in its first weekend), but this weekend sees Noah Baumbach and Greta Gerwig's "Frances Ha" expand to even more theaters.

Review: Endearing & Buoyant ‘Frances Ha’ Marks A Terrific Gear Shift For Director Noah Baumbach

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • May 15, 2013 3:55 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Loose, limber and driven by a fierce energy and staccato/pause rhythm we haven't seen previously from this filmmaker, Noah Baumbach's sublime "Frances Ha" is a fresh and vivacious near-reinvention of the director/writer's comedic milieu. An enchanting riff on friendship and the late-20-something right of passage into true adulthood, while the buoyant comedy does focus on those who still don't have their shit together, it is however, leagues more rich and emotionally layered than the average arrested development dilemma that seems to characterize 20/30-something comedies of late.

First Look: Greta Gerwig In Noah Baumbach's Secret Black & White Film 'Frances Ha'

  • By Edward Davis
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  • July 24, 2012 6:02 PM
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  • 27 Comments
One of the best pleasant surprises of the initial Toronto International Film Festival announcement this morning? The surprise reveal of a new Noah Baumbach film. While Baumbach, the filmmaker behind "The Squid and the Whale," hinted to us in a recent interview that something was up his sleeve, we didn't imagine it was something we'd be seeing so soon.

'Cloud Atlas,' 'Looper,' 'Argo,' 'To The Wonder,' 'A Place Beyond The Pines' Lead Amazing 2012 TIFF Line-Up

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 24, 2012 7:09 AM
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  • 24 Comments
So this morning, Variety spilled the beans on the first wave of announcements for the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival, and... boy, it looks like a great year. So much so that we wonder how much is left over for other fall festivals like Venice or Telluride. A few of the most anticipated films won't be world premieres, suggesting that they'll be popping up elsewhere shortly before, but we count 40 films announced so far as world premieres, among them films that are sure to make major waves.

Woody Allen Talks The Inspiration Of Italian Cinema For 'To Rome With Love'

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • June 21, 2012 1:59 PM
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  • 2 Comments
“With Woody Allen, you have someone who is responsible for more memorable moments than anyone who’s ever been involved in films,” says Alec Baldwin, one of the stars of “To Rome With Love,” who joined various cast members and the director in New York City to talk with press with about the film. The 42nd film of the career of the writer, director and legend, Allen doesn’t have to go far to find an exciting collaborator like Baldwin, who bluntly says, “When he calls you and asks you to come and do this, if you’re available, you go.”

Trailer & Poster Arrives For Greta Gerwig/Joel Kinnaman Summer Rom-Com 'Lola Versus'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 5, 2012 3:56 PM
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  • 3 Comments
It was somewhat underseen, but as indie relationship comedy-dramas about twentysomethings go (and it's not like there's a lack of them), 2009's "Breaking Upwards" was one of the better ones. Written by and starring Daryl Wein and Zoe Lister-Jones and directed by Wein, it followed a young couple who decide to ease into a break-up by entering an open relationship -- one day together, one day apart. It had its share of whimsy, as well as two very appealing leads, and an unusual rawness to its emotion that meant it lingered longer in the mind than some of its competition.

Greta Gerwig Says Noah Baumbach's 'The Corrections' Is 'After Hours' Meets 'Hannah And Her Sisters'; Talks Working With Woody Allen On 'To Rome With Love'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • March 21, 2012 2:37 PM
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  • 0 Comments
After flirting with the mainstream last year in "No Strings Attached" and "Arthur," indie darling Greta Gerwig is firmly back in her usual territory for the next couple of years: the actress will next star in Tribeca Film Festival entry "Lola Versus," has Woody Allen's "To Rome With Love" following in the summer, and just wrapped a reunion with "Greenberg" director Noah Baumbach on the pilot for the HBO adaptation of Jonathan Franzen's "The Corrections."

Maggie Gyllenhaal & Rhys Ifans Circling Noah Baumbach's 40-Hour-Long HBO Series 'The Corrections'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • January 20, 2012 9:22 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Nothing demonstrates the status of HBO these days better than "The Corrections." Jonathan Franzen's novel was hugely acclaimed on publication in 2001, later landing atop many of the "best of the decade" literary lists, and was soon snapped up for a film version by Scott Rudin, one of the most important producers in Hollywood, and the man behind some of the most acclaimed novel-to-film translations of the last decade, from "Wonder Boys" to "No Country For Old Men."

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