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Xavier Dolan Prepping English-Language 'The Death And Life Of John F. Donovan' & Jeremy Saulnier Lines Up 'Green Room'

  • By Mark Zhuravsky
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  • May 22, 2014 11:23 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Mommy, Dolan
If you haven't heard, our man Gabe Toro fell head over heels for Jeremy Saulnier's "Blue Ruin," the “sudden, terrifying, and excitingly singular” thriller that follows a beach bum-turned-avenger. The film was likewise lauded last year on the Croisette, taking home the Fipresci Prize aka the international film critic's award. With "Blue Ruin" bowing in theaters and on demand last month, the accolades keep on rolling in and Broad Green Pictures is listening.

Watch: Jeremy Saulnier Details The Bloody Aftermath In "Anatomy Of A Scene" For 'Blue Ruin'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 9, 2014 1:26 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Blue Ruin
"I wanted to make a movie with my best friend, where I could really showcase Macon [Blair], nudge him a bit out of his comfort zone by not doing self-parody or gonzo humor. We were gonna make a real movie that might be interpreted as legitimate art, but we weren’t going to totally shed our love of blood and guts, cars on the road, wind and dust and sand," "Blue Ruin" director Jeremy Saulnier recently told us. "I wanted to have these elements that were usually too expensive to harness, so I bought my own camera and constructed a whole narrative around Macon." And the result is a movie with blood, guts and lots of critical acclaim, including at FIPRESCI Prize win at Cannes. And if you haven't seen it yet, perhaps this will push you in the right direction.

Interview: ‘Blue Ruin’ Director Jeremy Saulnier Talks Grounding The Revenge Film, Facial Hair & Embracing Limitations

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
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  • April 24, 2014 2:11 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Blue Ruin
As arguably few surprises resulted from last week’s Cannes lineup, last year’s inclusion of “Blue Ruin” came as an utter shock to its DP-turned-director, Jeremy Saulnier. “I was on the way to a corporate video shoot in Cleveland, and had sort of accepted that this movie wasn't going to break through and I'm going to go back to my day job,” he said when we sat down with him recently in Los Angeles. Passed over by Sundance and on uncertain terms with the Cannes jury, the film persisted, making it into Directors' Fortnight, thoroughly wowing audiences, and picking up the FIPRESCI Prize as a result.

Review: Terrifying, Suspenseful Thriller 'Blue Ruin'

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 22, 2014 6:59 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Blue Ruin
Dwight (Macon Blair), the lead character of “Blue Ruin,” is a haggard, defeated, middle-aged man. His clothing clings to him, as if to avoid callously slipping to the ground. His beard seems to have formed on his face the way weeds gather on undernourished lawns. One of our first glimpses of his eyes come from the way they gape when he finds out people are home, and he’s naked in the bath. His mad dash reveals this is not his house. But those eyes remain troubled even when he’s not using the homes and resources of others. The sense is that Dwight hasn’t been home for years, and he hasn’t felt at home within himself for even longer.

5 Directors We Want To See Tackle 'True Detective' Season 2

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • March 11, 2014 1:20 PM
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  • 61 Comments
True Detective
Well, the most-talked about TV drama since "Breaking Bad" is done for the moment, with the eighth episode of "True Detective" airing on HBO Sunday night, providing closure on the Yellow King and the spread of the conspiracy (catch up with our recap of the final part here). For the last couple of months, the internet has been abuzz with theories, arguments and think-pieces: whatever you think of Nic Pizzolatto's show, there's no denying that it provided an awful lot to chew on.

TIFF Review: Suspense Thriller 'Blue Ruin' Is Terrifying, And Excitingly Singular

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • September 5, 2013 12:05 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Blue Ruin
Dwight (Macon Blair), the lead character of “Blue Ruin,” is a haggard, defeated, middle-aged man. His clothing clings to him, as if to avoid callously slipping to the ground. His beard seems to have formed on his face the way weeds gather on undernourished lawns. One of our first glimpses of his eyes come from the way they gape when he finds out people are home, and he’s naked in the bath. His mad dash reveals this is not his house. But those eyes remain troubled even when he’s not using the homes and resources of others. The sense is that Dwight hasn’t been home for years, and he hasn’t felt at home within himself for even longer.

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