Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

The Playlist

Watch: Martin Scorsese Talks Lovingly About Film Restoration & How 'The Seven Year Itch' Spurred His Preservation Work

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • November 23, 2012 11:59 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
There are few filmmakers -- or people -- as dedicated, knowledgeable and passionate about cinema and its history as Martin Scorsese. A virtual walking encyclopedia about any corner of film lore you can think of, he remains fascinated and excited by movies and filmmakers, but in particular is concerned with making sure the early days of the art form aren't lost to the dusts of time. Through The Film Foundation and the World Cinema Foundation, he has worked tirelessly to preserve and restore films for future generations.

Scorsese At 70: 5 Of His Most Underrated Films

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • November 16, 2012 12:33 PM
  • |
  • 37 Comments
Tomorrow, November 17th, one Martin Charles Scorsese turns 70. One of the most celebrated American filmmakers in the history of the medium, Scorsese first broke out in the 1970s, coming out of the mentorship of Roger Corman (for whom he made "Boxcar Bertha") to direct the astonishingly confident "Mean Streets." And over the years, the director has made multiple classics, from "Taxi Driver" and "Raging Bull" to recent awards-laden triumphs like "The Departed" and "Hugo."

Watch: The Clash Cameo In 'The King Of Comedy' Plus Martin Scorsese Talks 'Lawrence Of Arabia'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • November 13, 2012 2:31 PM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
Martin Scorsese turns 70 on Friday, and the man has never been busier. In the midst of a multitude of projects, he's currently shooting his next feature, "The Wolf Of Wall Street," but of course, he took some time out recently to talk about David Lean's masterpiece, "Lawrence Of Arabia," as it arrives in a brand new 4-disc set today (get that Christmas shopping done early, folks). But before we jump into that, let's rewind the clock slightly.

Watch: Rare Footage Of Martin Scorsese & Michael Powell On The Set Of 'The King Of Comedy'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • November 8, 2012 2:43 PM
  • |
  • 5 Comments
The short version of the story goes like this. In 1960, Michael Powell of the famed Powell & Pressburger directorial team, struck out on his own and helmed "Peeping Tom." The result? Critics and British industry savaged the movie at the time, and he found himself essentially excommunicated and exiled. However, he was championed by the new school of American filmmakers, Martin Scorsese, in particular. It was through him that he met his future wife, editor Thelma Schoonmaker, and the rest is history.

Watch: Martin Scorsese's Cameo In Bertrand Tavernier's 'Round Midnight'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • October 15, 2012 1:05 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Here's a bit of an '80s rewind for you to start your week. While Martin Scorsese is no stranger to popping up in the front of the camera from time to time, the appearances are usually brief, but here's a look at something a little meatier. The director took a very small part in Bertrand Tavernier's 1986 film "Round Midnight." The 1950s-set film stars jazz legend Dexter Gordon as a fading musician who heads to Paris in a last attempt to revitalize his career in the face of alcoholism and personal woes. Scorsese plays a crooked former New York City club manager whose good intentions aren't what they seem. Jazz heads should take note that Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Freddie Hubbard and more make appearances.

Did Christopher Lloyd Turn Down A Role In Martin Scorsese's 'The Last Temptation Of Christ'?

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • October 13, 2012 11:42 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Film history is littered with incarnations of movies that could've been made under a different situation with an entirely different cast, but for various reasons just didn't work out. Just look at Paul Thomas Anderson's "The Master" which at one point was gearing up to go with Philip Seymour Hoffman and Jeremy Renner in the leads, with Reese Witherspoon apparently offered a role (mostly likely the part eventually played by Amy Adams) with Amanda Seyfried, Emma Stone and Deborah Ann Woll all being considered for the smaller role of Elizabeth in the picture. And while Anderson eventually re-mounted the picture that we know today, it's interesting to imagine what might have been. And now there's another similar little morsel to ponder over.

Martin Scorsese Producing Bahman Ghobadi's Next New York-Set Next Film, '60 Seconds Of Us'

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
  • |
  • October 8, 2012 9:41 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
While Kurdish director Bahman Ghobadi has practiced rather unconventional narratives and aesthetics, starting from his 2000 debut “A Time For Drunken Horses” through to his 2009 look into underground Persian rock, “No One Knows About Persian Cats,” his films have nonetheless remained central to Iran's borders. However, following a fruitful early meeting with Martin Scorsese that led to his latest feature “Rhino Season” finding production and release this year ("presented by" the legendary filmmaker no less), it seems Ghobadi's next project will be even more intertwined.

Martin Scorsese & 'Hoop Dreams' Helmer Steve James Team For Documentary Based On Roger Ebert's Memoirs

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • September 7, 2012 12:45 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
As probably the most celebrated and beloved film critic around, a man whose work has appeared in the Chicago Sun-Times for 45 years, who co-hosted "At The Movies" with Gene Siskel for almost 25, and who was the first film critic to win the Pulitzer Prize, it's almost surprising that Roger Ebert has never been the subject of a movie himself. He's had some limited involvement behind the scenes of other films -- he wrote scripts for exploitations maestro Russ Meyer in the 1970s, but no one's ever made a major film about Ebert.

Venice Review: Spike Lee's 'Bad 25' A Comprehensive & Warm Look At The Making Of Michael Jackson's Album

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • August 31, 2012 7:36 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
A couple of years ago, before he set up his low-budget comeback film “Red Hook Summer," Spike Lee was planning another NYC-set project, “Brooklyn Loves MJ,” with the story taking place on the night of the death of pop superstar Michael Jackson in June 2009. Said to star Samuel L. Jackson, Julianne Moore, Anthony Mackie and more, the film never came together (although Lee told us recently that he hoped to get it going again), but the director’s been able to pay tribute to the late King of Pop in a couple of other ways. For one, he’s helped to organize a semi-annual Brooklyn Loves MJ party (although it didn’t take place this year or last for various reasons). And then there’s the director’s latest film, and his second of 2012, “Bad 25.” The subject matter is less weighty for the man behind such stirring docs as "4 Little Girls" and "When The Levees Broke," but the results are no less pleasing for this effort which delves into the making of Jackson's Bad, the fifth biggest-selling LP of all time.

Martin Scorsese's 'The Wolf of Wall Street' Script Calls For Gene Hackman Voice-Over, Dwarf Tossing & More

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
  • |
  • August 24, 2012 11:19 AM
  • |
  • 4 Comments
With a star-studded cast including Leonardo DiCaprio, Matthew McConaughey, and Jonah Hill along with source material delving into Wall Street greed and betrayal, Martin Scorsese's latest film, “The Wolf of Wall Street,” seems to be his return to recognizable territory of horrible deeds done by extravagant individuals. However, as glimpsed from a recent peek at the script written by Terence Winter (“Boardwalk Empire”), those familiar elements do feature some intriguing twists to the formula that Scorsese has made classic, in addition to news of another veteran actor who may be lending solely his voice talents to the project. Minor spoilers below.

Email Updates

Recent Comments