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Mia Hansen-Love Helming Dance World Saga 'Eden' Starring Brady Corbet and Greta Gerwig

  • By Ben Brock
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  • September 4, 2013 12:15 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Seemingly every generation's zeitgeist-capturing musical movement has its correlating cinematic interpretation (usually about an arty director with some experience in said movement). Whit Stillman's “The Last Days of Disco” attempted to be that film for the early '80s and the waning days of the '70s musical fad of choice; Michael Winterbottom's “24 Hour Party People” captured the Factory records heyday of the late '80s; and now, behold, Mia Hansen-Love is bringing us "Eden," a chronicle of the electronic music boom of the '90s.

'Goodbye First Love' Helmer Mia Hansen-Løve's Next Film Is A Two-Part Drama Set In The French House Music Scene

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 30, 2012 10:44 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Only three films into her career, Mia Hansen-Løve has established herself as one of the more exciting names in world cinema. Her debut, "Tout est pardonné," was named the Best First Film at the César awards when she was only 27, and her next, the excellent "The Father Of My Children," put her on the world stage, something firmed up by her most recent picture, the touching, beautiful "Goodbye, First Love." And with husband Olivier Assayas, she makes up one half of a helluva talented filmmaker marriage.

NYFF Review: 'Goodbye First Love' Looks At Young Romance Without Affection

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • October 23, 2011 6:25 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Television and movies love to indulge us in pre-adulthood nostalgia. Whether the bait is loose (young hooligans causing a ruckus) or more specific and event-oriented (prom, which we've seen less of lately because, well, prom sucks), the powers that be tug at our heartstrings and force us to look back at a time free of major responsibilities and full of fresh experiences. The glazed schmaltz can be off-putting for some, but occasionally sincerity shines through and we get something that captures the emotions extraordinarily well (for this writer's money, "The Virgin Suicides" and "The Girl" are uneven but nail certain feelings on the head). But if we look back without this fondness, what are these stories? Are they merely just happenings that somehow affected the person we become, or are they just the product of naive children that didn't know better? Mia Hansen-Løve's "Goodbye First Love" attempts a critical look at a teenager's first relationship without wooing us first with their blithe beginnings, but has very little to say about the topic.

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