The Playlist

Ron Howard To Helm Drug Tale 'Mena,' 'Tabu' Director Miguel Gomes Lines Up 'Arabian Nights' & More

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • February 10, 2014 9:40 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Ron Howard, Rush
While the disappointing box office of Ron Howard's underrated "Rush" caused a shakeup at production house Exclusive Media, that doesn't mean no one is banking on the director. And Universal has stepped up, putting down $1 million on a spec script by Gary Spinelli (whose only credit is the Dolph Lundgren starring "Stash House") for Howard to helm.

Cannes Directors' Fortnight Poster Gets Some Modern Cowboys, 'Tabu' Director Miguel Gomes To Head Critics' Week Jury

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • March 27, 2013 8:14 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Well, it's not quite the instantly hangable and collectible poster that the Cannes Film Festival unveiled last week, but the Directors' Fortnight sidebar is often known for it's slightly more adventurous programming and their one sheet for this year's festivities certainly plays to that notion.

Miguel Gomes Discusses The Mystical Poetry Of 'Tabu' And The Pleasures And Phantoms Of Cinema

  • By Christopher Bell
  • |
  • December 26, 2012 1:15 PM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
Behold the courage of Portuguese filmmaker Miguel Gomes: hoping to do a film in the vein of “Meet Me In St. Louis,” he and a crew traveled to the small Arganil Municipality in the country to begin work on a movie featuring a small family band -- that is until the movie’s investor died before signing on the dotted line. Instead of calling it a day, Gomes pressed on and made “Our Beloved Month of August,” a doc/fiction hybrid that captured the essence of the lively environment while commenting on the fragility and banality of a film production. It’s a special, beautiful beast of a movie that unfortunately didn’t see much of a release. Luckily, Gomes has quickly followed up with the brilliant “Tabu” (which we gave an A-grade review to out of TIFF).

Review: ‘Tabu’ Is Magic Realism In Rapture, As Only The Language Of Cinema Can Tell It

  • By Nikola Grozdanovic
  • |
  • December 26, 2012 12:12 PM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
The following article is a reprint of our review that ran during the Toronto Interntional Film Festival. Keep an eye on this one too. It's been released very late in the year, but we suspect you'll be seeing it on many of our top 10 lists.

NYFF: Miguel Gomes On 'Tabu' And The Pleasures And Phantoms Of Cinema

  • By Christopher Bell
  • |
  • October 17, 2012 8:01 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Behold the courage of Portuguese filmmaker Miguel Gomes: hoping to do a film in the vein of “Meet Me In St. Louis,” he and and a crew traveled to the small Arganil Municipality in the country to begin work on a movie featuring a small family band -- that is until the movie’s investor died before signing the dotted line. Instead of calling it a day, Gomes pressed on and made "Our Beloved Month of August," a doc/fiction hybrid that captured the essence of the lively environment while commenting on the fragility and banality of a film production. It’s a special, beautiful beast of a movie that unfortunately didn’t see much of a release. Luckily, Gomes has quickly followed up with the brilliant “Tabu.”

TIFF Review: ‘Tabu’ Is Magic Realism In Rapture, As Only The Language Of Cinema Can Tell It

  • By Nikola Grozdanovic
  • |
  • September 9, 2012 10:00 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
It’s been known that a singular moment during a brilliant film can make you realize you’re watching something special, something that will be deposited into your memory bank with a very high interest rate. In Miguel Gomes’ third feature film, "Tabu," this moment comes while you’re still getting comfortable in your seat. A film-within-a-film begins proceedings, in which we are introduced to an ‘intrepid explorer’ who, heartbroken over the one he lost, commits suicide and gets eaten by a crocodile. Then something strange happens, the narrator says: this crocodile adopts the melancholic state of the explorer and, as the film comes to a close, spends his time with the ghost of the explorer’s lost ladyfriend. Welcome to movie magic.

MIFF '12 Reviews: Miguel Gomes' 'Tabu' & Kim Nguyen's 'War Witch'

  • By Simon Dang
  • |
  • August 20, 2012 2:05 PM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
Gomes' Berlin Film Festival Golden Bear winner is an evocative, lyrical two-chapter love story separated by decades and continents that transcends what initially seems to be nothing more than an experiment in style over substance. Beginning in modern day-ish Lisbon, we are introduced to Aurora, an old woman mentally and physical deteriorating, in an equally frightening and hilarious performance by Laura Soveral. On her death bed, Aurora mentions a lover's name which is written off by two companions (her maid and an empathetic neighbour) as nonsense but, upon discovery of this man's actual existence and his arrival to the hospital, the film transports into a dreamy, fairytale-like flashback to the pair's African-set romance that audaciously couples the existing black and white, 4:3 and 16mm photography with a world where there's little-to-no spoken dialogue and narrated by Gian Luca (Carlotta Cotta with v.o. by Gomes himself) -- a character abrutly introduced only seconds before.

Email Updates

Recent Comments