The Playlist

"I'm Not A Monkey": Watch Quentin Tarantino Shut Down U.K. Journalist Who Asks About Tie Between Movies & Violence

  • By Joe Cunningham
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  • January 10, 2013 5:26 PM
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  • 41 Comments
“Django Unchained” still hasn’t opened in the UK; in fact it’s one of four of this year’s Best Picture nominees that have yet to do so. It will, however, hit British cinemas in just eight days time, and Quentin Tarantino is over there at the moment to promote his new film which tonight has it’s London premiere. While doing said promoting, QT has so far come across as someone supremely confident in his own ability as a filmmaker, and unashamedly proud of the latest product he’s got to offer. In fact, it had all been going rather swimmingly, until he was interviewed by Channel 4 News’ Krishnan Guru-Murthy.

Quentin Tarantino Says Newtown Tragedy About "Gun Control And Mental Health" Issues, Not Movie Violence

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 4, 2013 1:39 PM
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  • 19 Comments
With the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Connecticut still lingering on the mind on the nation, there has been an awful lot of talk (but not much action) from politicians and pundits on both sides of the issue. But perhaps grabbing the biggest headline, for better or worse, was the lunkheaded NRA VP Wayne LaPierre, who dredged up the old argument that movie violence (citing films like "American Psycho" -- which has no guns -- and "Natural Born Killers") as the cause of these kinds of incidents, not the wide availability of assault weapons and magazines that carry more payload that anyone realistically needs outside of the military.

From Screenplay To Screen: Quentin Tarantino Talks Toning Down Violence In 'Django Unchained'

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
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  • January 3, 2013 9:57 AM
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  • 7 Comments
Amidst the ongoing flurry of debate over Quentin Tarantino's spaghetti western “Django Unchained,” one can at least declare safely that the hints to the final product on screen were always present. The screenplay -- leaked over a year ago and marked up in the director's handwriting -- contained the full vision of what Tarantino hoped to achieve, and now with disputes over the film's ruthless depiction of violence, the script and the director's words are here to clear the air.

Quentin Tarantino Says 'Prometheus' Was Kind Of Dumb; Explains Why 'Inglourious Basterds' Wasn't A Mini-Series

  • By Edward Davis
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  • January 2, 2013 5:43 PM
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  • 21 Comments
Keeping in line with the newly developing trend of Hollywood types calling out movies, the always talkative Quentin Tarantino has now weighed in on last summer's divisive sci-fi spectacle "Prometheus," and well, let's start with the good stuff.

Watch: Every Pop Culture Reference In Quentin Tarantino's Films

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 2, 2013 4:07 PM
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  • 0 Comments
One can't talk about Quentin Tarantino without talking about the movies, comics, TV shows, music and more that he loves. Even Quentin Tarantino himself can't talk about his own movies without talking about the movies, comics, TV shows and music that he loves. And now, many of the references he's peppered into his films to date (except "Django Unchained") have been conveniently distilled into one video for your viewing pleasure.

Watch: Quentin Tarantino's Shout Outs To Editor Sally Menke While Filming 'Inglourious Basterds' & 'Death Proof'

  • By Joe Cunningham
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  • January 2, 2013 10:23 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Up until “Inglorious Basterds,” and stretching all the way back to the first feature of his career, “Reservoir Dogs,” ever-present alongside Quentin Tarantino was his editor Sally Menke. She was twice nominated by the Academy for her work with QT (and three times by BAFTA), but sadly Menke passed away in 2010 at the age of 56. Fred Raskin (a former assistant editor under Menke on “Kill Bill” and the editor of the last three “Fast & Furious” films) took over editing duties on “Django Unchained,” and Menke's must have been some tough shoes to fill.

Listen: Quentin Tarantino's Soundtrack Commentary For 'Django Unchained'

  • By Cain Rodriguez
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  • December 31, 2012 9:03 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Now that Quentin Tarantino’s epic slavery western has been out for a week you’ve probably not only seen a couple of times -- for an R-rated western it’s doing surprisingly well -- but you’re also probably giving the soundtrack a spin. And now, you can enjoy the soundtrack complete with a track-by-track commentary by Tarantino himself.

Quentin Tarantino Says He & Johnny Depp Would Love To Work Together; His Wishlist Includes Meryl Streep & Michael Caine

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • December 30, 2012 10:44 AM
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  • 28 Comments
Quentin Tarantino has a stable of familiar actors he works with, but for his latest film, "Django Unchained," the director switched it up, casting two actors he's never worked with before for prominent roles: Jamie Foxx as the lead and Leonardo DiCaprio as the villain (arguably there are lots of new faces including Kerry Washington, Don Johnson and more).

5 Spaghetti Westerns & 5 Slavesploitation Films That Paved The Way For 'Django Unchained'

  • By Simon Abrams
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  • December 28, 2012 1:00 PM
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  • 13 Comments
It’s strange to think that it’s taken so many years for Quentin Tarantino to make a spaghetti western. Tarantino did previously describe “Inglorious Basterds,” the title of which comes from Enzo G. Castellari’s passable rip-off of “The Dirty Dozen,” as “my spaghetti western with World War II iconography.” But “Django Unchained” is the first pastiche, defined as a work of fiction that appropriates elements of other genres for the sake of creating something new, that Tarantino’s done that’s primarily made of spaghetti western tropes. So when Franco Nero, the star of the hyper-violent original “Django” and many others, shows up in “Unchained,” it’s not just a smug wink to the audience: it’s Tarantino’s way of acknowledging the tradition of appropriation and exploitation that his movies come from.

Walton Goggins Talks Replacing Kurt Russell In ‘Django Unchained’ & Tarantino’s Longer Cut Of The Film

  • By Edward Davis
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  • December 27, 2012 1:15 PM
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  • 7 Comments
When “Justified” actor Walton Goggins originally signed on for Quentin Tarantino’s antebellum slave drama “Django Unchained” he had a small part as a plantation thug, Billy Crash, who worked under Leonardo DiCaprio’s scene-chewing villain in the movie. But fortune smiled on him during production. Kurt Russell was cast as a Mandingo trainer named Ace Woody, that served as villain Calvin Candie (DiCaprio)'s right hand man.

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