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The Playlist

Watch: Feel 'Signs Of Vigorous Life' With Vintage 30-Minute Doc On Herzog, Fassbinder, Wenders, Schlöndorff & More

  • By Ken Guidry
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  • February 21, 2014 10:45 AM
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  • 1 Comment
We can’t imagine what you do with your spare time and quite frankly it’s best we never find out, but the good folks over at The Seventh Art are often scouring the internet for hidden video gems. The stuff that they’re able to find is rarely disappointing and this video in particular is quite the find.

David Slade, Jim Sheridan, Ken Loach & More Line Up New Projects

  • By Ken Guidry
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  • May 9, 2013 10:50 AM
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  • 2 Comments
From serious historical dramas to light Vince Vaughn comedies, we have an abundance of director news to share with you for your reading pleasure…

Göteborg Interview: Director Volker Schlöndorff On ‘Calm At Sea,’ His Greatest Cinematic Failure & 'The Master'

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • February 9, 2013 12:55 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Presenting his new film “Calm at Sea” (reviewed here) in the Bio Roy Theater during the Göteborg International Film Festival last week, director Volker Schlöndorff said, in mock-pique, “It’s so great to be in this wonderful theatre, named after Sweden’s great filmmaker Roy Andersson. I‘m still waiting for my hometown to put up a theater in my name.” And perhaps given the level of esteem in which he is held, especially in his home country, the idea of one day catching a 2.30 showing at The Volker is not so farfetched. But of course Schlondorff’s career has hardly been plain sailing, with his towering achievement, the oddly compelling, uncanny adaptation of Günter Grass' “The Tin Drum” rather overshadowing the films that came before and after, especially having been crowned with an Oscar and the Palme d’Or.

Göteborg Review: Volker Schlöndorff’s ‘Calm At Sea’ Is A Wrenching WWII Tale Told In Capable But Old-Fashioned Style

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • February 5, 2013 6:02 PM
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  • 0 Comments
A story that is apparently very famous all over France -- that of Guy Moquet, a 17 year-old boy executed by the Nazis as part of a reprisal for the assassination of one of their officers -- forms the heart of veteran German director Volker Schlondorff’s latest film, which screened at the Göteborg International Film Festival last week. Titled “Calm at Sea” and based on primary source documents from the period (the letters, diaries and reports left by the participants, the writing of which often forms part of the onscreen action), the film is a solid piece of historical reconstruction, that despite never quite reaching any heights of inspiration, nonetheless builds to a surprisingly moving finale.

Director Volker Schlöndorff To Return To U.S. With Colm Toibin Co-Written 'Montauk'

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • February 2, 2013 12:01 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Legendary German director Volker Schlöndorff, who won an Oscar and a Palme d’Or for “The Tin Drum” back in 1979, has been in and out of critical favor ever since, last releasing a film in 2007 (“Ulzhan”). He’s back, on the European cinema scene at least, with France-set World War II story “Calm at Sea,” which played yesterday at the Göteborg International Film Festival (review to come), and when we spoke with the director here earlier, he told us in a little more detail about his upcoming projects, one of which will mark a return to the U.S. for the first time since 1998’s potboiler noir “Palmetto,” starring Woody Harrelson, Gina Gershon and Chloe Sevigny.

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