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New Plot Details Revealed For Wong Kar-Wai's Next Film

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 23, 2014 7:53 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Last week came word that Wong Kar-Wai was picking up the pace a bit, and set to shoot his next film in 2015. There weren't many details at the time except that the film would be a "romance" (which isn't exactly a surprise), and feature a still-undisclosed male lead "all women are crazy about." Well, the slow drip of info continues this morning, as a few bit of information about the project have emerged.

Wong Kar-Wai Reportedly Shooting New Film In 2015

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 19, 2014 9:03 AM
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  • 5 Comments
Wong Kar Wai, The Grandmaster
Generally speaking, as Wong Kar-Wai's career has grown longer, so too has the breaks between each film. In fact, "The Grandmaster" marked the biggest wait yet, coming six years after the director kinda sorta tried to go Hollywood with "My Blueberry Nights." Granted, it wasn't completely his fault with the production halted due to injury, but then again, he does have to take some blame for a process that often sees him changing course or working to exacting standards even if it means delays. All that aside, it looks like Kar-Wai doesn't want to wait too long to get back to work.

Wong Kar-Wai & Martin Scorsese Talk ‘The Grandmaster,’ Fights, Music & More In New York City

  • By Alex Suskind
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  • January 9, 2014 12:06 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Martin Scorsese Wong Kar-Wai
Martin Scorsese took a break from promoting “The Wolf of Wall Street” last night to help get the word out on another film that has his name on it: Wong Kar-wai’s “The Grandmaster.” At a special screening at the Lighthouse International Theater in New York City, Scorsese and Wong participated in an entertaining and detailed question and answer session, where they discussed everything from the film’s grueling three-year production to its beautifully meditative fight sequences.

'The Grandmaster' Cinematographer Philippe Le Sourd Talks Pleasure & Pain Of Shooting Wong Kar-Wai's Epic

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • December 14, 2013 10:36 AM
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  • 0 Comments
'Grandmaster' Cinematographer Philippe Le Sourd
Wong Kar-wai's historical epic "The Grandmaster" charts the mostly true story of Ip Man (Tony Leung), the martial arts master who would eventually teach a young Bruce Lee how to fight. Whatever your take on this expansive and arty picture, it's easy to agree that the movie is absolutely magnificent to look at. This is due to Wong's close collaboration with French cinematographer Philippe Le Sourd, who was able to bring out the vivaciousness of any scene, whether an intense fight sequence or a quieter moment of subtle yearning (this is, after all, a Wong Kar-wai movie). We got a chance to talk with the cinematographer about what it was like working on the movie, how difficult it was to maintain consistency with such an lengthy shoot (almost spanning three years from stem to stern), and much more

Stream This: 'Ain't Them Bodies Saints,' 'A Single Shot,' Films From Wong Kar-Wai & More On VOD This Week

  • By Emma Bernstein
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  • August 23, 2013 5:25 PM
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  • 17 Comments
Stream This: Ain't Them Bodies Saints, Single Shot, more
Hello, streamers! Our picks for this week should prove to be nostalgic and contemporary, reflective and forward thinking, a look to the inspirational works of the past with a glance at what they've rendered since. Two films debuting in theaters are also new to VOD, while the release of Destin Cretton's much hailed "Short Term 12" encouraged us to take a look at his last feature. And with the opening of Wong Kar-wai's tenth feature film this weekend, we decided to feature the Chinese director quite prominently: some works—"Happy Together," "In the Mood for Love," and "Chungking Express"—are already well known, so we're offering a curated assortment from his early days of writing and directing that you may be a little less familiar with. The Criterion Collection's special presentation of remastered films (care of Martin Scorsese's World Cinema Foundation) on Hulu deserves similar attention, and we have an overview of two of our favorites from that group. Bet you can't wait to find out what they are! Let's get going.

Interview: Wong Kar-Wai Talks Kung Fu, The Different 'The Grandmaster' Cuts & His Favorite Directors

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • August 22, 2013 3:22 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Wong Kar Wai, The Grandmaster
It's been six long years since a new Wong Kar-Wai movie graced cinema screens. The notoriously patient director behind "Chungking Express" and "In the Mood for Love" is back with "The Grandmaster," the biographical tale of Ip Man (also known as Yip Man), a true life historical figure (played in the film by the always brilliant Tony Leung) and martial arts wizard who would go on to train some kid called Bruce Lee. Harkening back to the director's earlier films, while adding a new level of expert technical precision, "The Grandmaster" is for any fan of kung fu or a devotee of Kar-Wai's work. It's in turns epic and gorgeous, a movie that demands to be seen, just for its visual opulence, and then discussed at length afterwards. We got a chance to do just that with Wong himself, who talked about the film's somewhat tortured production, why he decided to tell this story, what's different between this version and the international cut, what it was like working with Megan Ellison and who his favorite modern filmmakers are.

Watch: 30-Minute Making Of Documentary On 'In The Mood For Love' Plus New 'The Grandmaster' Featurette

  • By Ben Brock
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  • August 20, 2013 2:42 PM
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  • 1 Comment
The wait for Wong Kar-wai's “The Grandmaster” is nearly over. The film is opening this Friday, having been out in some parts of the world for the best part of a year. And while you watch those last few hours count down, you can continue to indulge in our look back at the great Hong Kong director's career. We have this all-consuming retrospective, and this documentary about the making of "Chungking Express" from a few weeks back, and now one more for you, a similar documentary about the making of 2000's “In The Mood For Love,” probably Wong's best-known and most acclaimed picture.

Review: The U.S. Cut Of Wong Kar-Wai’s ‘The Grandmaster’

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • August 20, 2013 11:04 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Exquisitely crafted, as visually stunning as you’d imagine and virtuosic in its meticulously gorgeous fight choreography (which acts as a kind of throwdown to comers like the Wachowski siblings), acclaimed Hong Kong auteur Wong Kar-wai’s “The Grandmaster” is nevertheless still an uneven and unbalanced affair that doesn’t track and cannot negotiate its various aims. Ostensibly a chronicle of the the story and struggles of Ip Man (played by longtime WKW collaborator Tony Leung), the seminal Chinese martial artist who famously taught Bruce Lee, “The Grandmaster” is both his story, and a type of martial arts history lesson concerning Ip’s self-defense-based discipline Wing Chun. But this being a Wong Kar-wai film, a moody, familiar unrequited love story with the daughter of a rival Grandmaster, Gong Er (Zhang Ziyi), also materializes to only minimally convincing (and emotional) effect. But none of these three stories add up to much of an engaging experience, outside of relishing the action sequences and admiring the elegance of the aesthetic drapes as it were.

Watch: New Trailer For 'The Grandmaster' Scored To Song From 'Man With The Iron Fists' For Some Reason

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • August 19, 2013 7:57 PM
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  • 2 Comments
They tried bringing Wong Kar-wai to Comic-Con, and they even issued a comic book based on the movie, but it seems The Weinstein Company can't whip up enough excitement for Wong Kar-wai's "The Grandmaster." So now, they're just hoping RZA can do the heavy lifting because everyone likes hip hop and he's a big martial arts fan... or something...

Retrospective: The Films Of Wong Kar-Wai

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • August 19, 2013 2:00 PM
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  • 10 Comments
Retro: The Films of Wong Kar Wai
Perhaps the best way to describe Shanghai-born, Hong Kong director Wong Kar-wai is as a fetishist of romance. Throughout his entire career, which spans four decades of filmmaking, the director has manifested his obsessive preoccupation with details and minutiae time and again; the little fleeting moments and impressions that that add up to a mood. “I’ve never worked with someone who’s put so much emphasis on a single moment,” Jude Law said in a New York Times interview in 2008, describing an entire night of shooting devoted to different angles and set-ups on a kiss within “My Blueberry Nights.”

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